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    Does anyone know what the top private schools are like and why they are so successful?
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    why are they so succcesful?
    becasue they have lots of money to spend on teachers and resources.

    love Katy ***

    (Original post by ickle_katy)
    becasue they have lots of money to spend on teachers and resources.
    I hate this sterotype of a private school.
    Dont you people think that a successful school needs sucessful students? And motivated students as well?
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    (Original post by Unregistered)
    I hate this sterotype of a private school.
    Dont you people think that a successful school needs sucessful students? And motivated students as well?
    Of course.
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    (Original post by Unregistered)
    I hate this sterotype of a private school.
    Dont you people think that a successful school needs sucessful students? And motivated students as well?
    Sure but there's only so much a motivated student can do in an environment that doesn't entirely encourage them to thrive. (ie. a state school).

    I mean, I was at a state school and all my class sizes were 30, whereas in the private school nearby they were about 15 to a class. This means a lot more 1-1 tuition and a lot more time for individual needs. Also, if the teacher is under less stress, they will work better.

    Also I guess there is more pressure on private school students to do well both by the school and the parents due to the money involved. I know that if my parents were spending £10,000+ a year for my education I wouldn't want to let them down!

    Not to mention the fact that most of the best private schools have entrance exams so they can be selective about who they take in, state schools don't have that option really so there are a lot of students with learning difficulties / just less intelligent , there.

    And what do you think are successful students? I am a private school teacher, and I am also a school inspector. All "successful" schools have one thing in common. The sudents view the school as a resource to be used. And not to trudge along and sit there. And for that they have to be congratulated.

    ONE: Private school do not cost £10, 000 + per annum. Mine costs £6000. Its alot but can you really put money on a child's future?

    TWO: Private schools do not have a class of 15. Mine has an average of 25+. The teachers are the same, but only the resources are different. Ie better IT resources, and better Library. This is the meaning of a private school.

    Also yes I agree, you do need to be motivated to go to a private school in the first place, otherwise your parents go mental when they see your results.

    Also one final point, don't you think that when your parents strive so hard so that they can get a decent pay so that you will have a better chance than they had, dont you just feel an urge to give something back?

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    (Original post by Unregistered)
    ONE: Private school do not cost £10, 000 + per annum. Mine costs £6000. Its alot but can you really put money on a child's future?

    TWO: Private schools do not have a class of 15. Mine has an average of 25+. The teachers are the same, but only the resources are different. Ie better IT resources, and better Library. This is the meaning of a private school.

    Also yes I agree, you do need to be motivated to go to a private school in the first place, otherwise your parents go mental when they see your results.

    Also one final point, don't you think that when your parents strive so hard so that they can get a decent pay so that you will have a better chance than they had, dont you just feel an urge to give something back?
    Points ONE + TWO: these are different based on what private school you're talking about. In my experience (I did go to a private school for a while) my parents were paying between £8000 and £10,000 a year, and the classes were no larger than 15, and I know people who went to schools that cost more than that.

    Which leads me to, how can the teachers be the same? They aren't on the same wages, they have fewer students, and they have better teaching resources - which means they are inevitably going to be different to a teacher equally qualified at a state school where students are squashed into classes of 30, and where they struggle to get resources that they need?!

    Your final point.. that's precisely why I think private schools are a bad idea! I mean they do provide an excellent education, but when parents turn around and assume they are going to have straight A children and place such expectations on them, it's really not healthy.

    Let me give you an example of a very successful public school, and why it is successful.

    Near where I live there is a school called "St Paul's Girls' School" or "SPGS", which is meant to be one of the "Very Best" and "Most Expensive" private girls schools.

    I occasionally walk past it, and it even has a swimming pool, which is currently having work done to it.

    A friend at my college was doing a project on Independent school success, and got in touch with two girls from the school who he questioned. What he found out was interesting.

    Most public schools are very traditional and very strict, whereas this one in not. The school does not even have a uniform, and is many other ways is very similar to my sixth form college.

    Results from questioning the two girls showed several points which I have summarised below.

    - To enter the sixth form, you have to write an entrance exam in every subject you wish to study

    - Classes are very small, averaging 10 students each

    - You do not get chucked out if you are a have a lazy attitude

    - You do not get spoon fed for the exam, and if you fail, thats your problem

    After personally gathering more information about the school, I recon that the main reasons they do well are

    - All the girls come from rich backgrounds, and so have computers at home, making it easier to do coursework and then correct it if there are mistakes

    - There are about 7 applications for every place at the school, which means that they can cream off only the very brightest and best motivated

    - The fact that your parents are paying a lot of money for you to go to SPGS means that you feel under more pressure to achieve

    - Because it is so selective, all the girls who go to SPGS are well motivated, and so there are very few disipline problems at the school, which means that the teacher in a class can get on and teach the lesson and not have to worry about any trouble makers disrupting the lesson

    Also bear in mind that in practice, kids nowdays do not like being told what to do and so do not like being spoon fed or forced into any mould, and so I cannot understand how a school would spoonfeed students.
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    (Original post by Unregistered)
    Also bear in mind that in practice, kids nowdays do not like being told what to do and so do not like being spoon fed or forced into any mould, and so I cannot understand how a school would spoonfeed students.
    That's true. I guess in this kind of environment its easier for teachers to take that attitude, it doesn't bear what to think what would happen if some of the people in my state school would have done given that kind of independence.

    Wow, a pooL!! heh
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    (Original post by Unregistered)
    And what do you think are successful students? I am a private school teacher, and I am also a school inspector. All "successful" schools have one thing in common. The sudents view the school as a resource to be used. And not to trudge along and sit there. And for that they have to be congratulated.
    So where does that leave students in state schools? Are they somehow 'inferior' pupils because they do not see their school as a "resource to be used"? Independent schools develop that attitude in their pupils - it does not work the other way around. Yes, it is a positive attribute, but just because someone's parents could afford to send them to independent school does not mean that they are born with some kind of innate ability to be a good pupil. People are all just people, but some grow up in more supportive environments than others and are therefore better equipped to become 'better' students.

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    (Original post by fionah)
    That's true. I guess in this kind of environment its easier for teachers to take that attitude, it doesn't bear what to think what would happen if some of the people in my state school would have done given that kind of independence.

    Wow, a pooL!! heh
    Remeber the following:

    Teachers at state schools often have to teach a class of 30 or more pupils, of completely varying intelligence. There may be 10 people who'll be lucky to scrape an E at GCSE, 4 or so who're aiming for a C or a D and who do want to work, 12 complete troublemakers who don't care for education and 4 Oxbridge candidates. The teacher will have limited resources, face numerous bullying and other discipline problems and can't refer to a 'blackboard' because it's racist.

    There is another teacher who takes a private school class. Everyone in her class of 15 wants to work; everyone is of roughly the same ability. It doesn't take her 20 minutes to calm the class down each day. She doesn't have to send people out for flicking ink. In fact, she could probably just give the students the text book and they'd still get As and A*s.

    Now you tell me who's the better teacher.

    (Original post by Unregistered)
    I hate this sterotype of a private school.
    Dont you people think that a successful school needs sucessful students? And motivated students as well?
    The question was about TOP private schools. So Katy was right in saying they have so much more money to spend on teachers and resources and this is probably the main point. All others are just peripheral.
    P.
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    (Original post by Unregistered)
    ONE: Private school do not cost £10, 000 + per annum. Mine costs £6000. Its alot but can you really put money on a child's future?

    TWO: Private schools do not have a class of 15. Mine has an average of 25+. The teachers are the same, but only the resources are different. Ie better IT resources, and better Library. This is the meaning of a private school.

    Also yes I agree, you do need to be motivated to go to a private school in the first place, otherwise your parents go mental when they see your results.

    Also one final point, don't you think that when your parents strive so hard so that they can get a decent pay so that you will have a better chance than they had, dont you just feel an urge to give something back?
    ONE: Privates schools cost a varying degree of prices...one of mine was nearly £22,000 a year.

    TWO: The classes averaged 10-15 students....

    Personally I dont think you can comment on only one school as that is not going to be representative in the slightest. Within the UK the type, size and repuattion of s chools will signnificantly alter all the above.
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    (Original post by Unregistered)
    ONE: Private school do not cost £10, 000 + per annum. Mine costs £6000. Its alot but can you really put money on a child's future?
    With universities costing a lot nowdays as well, very few parents who have two or more children can afford even £6,000 a year, no matter how much of an investment they may consider it, the money isn't there.

    ahh, yes, but it all boils down to the students doesnt it? If u get an U in the exams, its not the schools fault, do some extra work for yourself!!! In the local library for instince (sp). I had a really bad RS teacher. He was funny, but got nothing done, so I did some extra work, whereas the rest of the class didnt and got worse marks.
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    (Original post by Unregistered)
    ahh, yes, but it all boils down to the students doesnt it? If u get an U in the exams, its not the schools fault, do some extra work for yourself!!! In the local library for instince (sp). I had a really bad RS teacher. He was funny, but got nothing done, so I did some extra work, whereas the rest of the class didnt and got worse marks.
    Yes but the point is in top independent schools people are spoonfed to the point that even those who are not particularly motivated can get top grades. In poor state schools only very exceptional students will do well whereas in top independents mediochre students will get high grades. The environment also encourages them to be more motivated, as does the fact that their parents are paying an arm and a leg for them to be there.

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    (Original post by Unregistered)
    ahh, yes, but it all boils down to the students doesnt it? If u get an U in the exams, its not the schools fault, do some extra work for yourself!!! In the local library for instince (sp). I had a really bad RS teacher. He was funny, but got nothing done, so I did some extra work, whereas the rest of the class didnt and got worse marks.
    But most parents don't like to put there children in a school and hope that they'll work hard. They want a school where hard work isn't just preached but s the norm. I doubt if a school like that exists but...
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    (Original post by Lord Huntroyde)
    But most parents don't like to put there children in a school and hope that they'll work hard. They want a school where hard work isn't just preached but s the norm. I doubt if a school like that exists but...
    I have spoken to a couple of people here who have come from top independent schools and they have said that they are shocked at the amount of work there is to do. At school they were used to being taught extremely well and given all the information they needed to pass the exam and now that they have to learn independently they are struggling. People from state schools who have made it to university, however, tend to be used to working independently and so have found the transition a lot easier, and that is because they have had to put in a lot of effort in order to learn the information which others have been handed on a plate.

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