Standard Room Temperature ? Watch

electriic_ink
Badges: 15
Rep:
?
#1
Report Thread starter 10 years ago
#1
Is room temperature taken to be 20oC or 25oC?
0
reply
pow1990
Badges: 0
#2
Report 10 years ago
#2
I thought standard temperature(STP) was 25 degrees and room temperature(RTP) was 20 degrees.
0
reply
electriic_ink
Badges: 15
Rep:
?
#3
Report Thread starter 10 years ago
#3
(Original post by pow1990)
I thought standard temperature(STP) was 25 degrees and room temperature(RTP) was 20 degrees.
Well Wikipedia says Room Temperature is 20oC

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Room_temperature

but I always thought it was 25. Clearly, what has happened is that I have confused Standard Temperature and Room Temperature. What's the difference between the two?
1
reply
Revd. Mike
Badges: 15
Rep:
?
#4
Report 10 years ago
#4
Standard temperature is the one you assume for your reactions and stuff, if no conditions are stated, and it's 298.15K, so 25*C. Although tbh the temperature of our labs at work is almost invariably 20*C lol.
1
reply
sam161
Badges: 7
Rep:
?
#5
Report 10 years ago
#5
Just if this helps at all, it might vary depending on the exam board... Sounds stupid but hey. In my Salters Chemical Ideas book it says the following:

At Standard Temperature and Pressure (s.t.p) the molar vol. of a gas is 22.4dm^3.
s.t.p means a temperature of 0C (273K) and 1 atmosphere pressure

At Room Temperature and Pressure (r.t.p) the molar vol. of a gas is 24dm^3.
r.t.p means a temperature around 25C (298K) and 1 atmosphere pressure.

Might help? It will probably be in the book for the course if you've got one. All this was under "Calclations Involving Gases" in Chemical Ideas.
2
reply
Delta Aitch
Badges: 13
#6
Report 10 years ago
#6
I always wrote it as 25*C (298 K)
0
reply
sam161
Badges: 7
Rep:
?
#7
Report 10 years ago
#7
Room temperature yeah. Calling it standard room temperate is a bit odd, because its either standard temp and pressure, or room temp and pressure. Standard room is just confusing haha.

I do know what you mean thought =]
0
reply
sorinipopa
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#8
Report 3 years ago
#8
(Original post by sam161)
Just if this helps at all, it might vary depending on the exam board... Sounds stupid but hey. In my Salters Chemical Ideas book it says the following:

At Standard Temperature and Pressure (s.t.p) the molar vol. of a gas is 22.4dm^3.
s.t.p means a temperature of 0C (273K) and 1 atmosphere pressure

At Room Temperature and Pressure (r.t.p) the molar vol. of a gas is 24dm^3.
r.t.p means a temperature around 25C (298K) and 1 atmosphere pressure.

Might help? It will probably be in the book for the course if you've got one. All this was under "Calclations Involving Gases" in Chemical Ideas.
Do you have a link for this Room Temperature definition?

Thanks
0
reply
benjaminlukas
Badges: 3
Rep:
?
#9
Report 1 year ago
#9
If room temperature taken as 25 C the vol of gas calculated using PV = n.RT would be 24.4 l (P=1 Atm, R=0.082, T=273 25=298)If room temperature taken as 20 C then using the same formula V= 24 l.
1
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts

All the exam results help you need

1,161

people online now

225,530

students helped last year
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

University open days

  • University of Dundee
    Undergraduate Open Day Undergraduate
    Mon, 26 Aug '19
  • University of Aberdeen
    General Open Day Undergraduate
    Tue, 27 Aug '19
  • Norwich University of the Arts
    Postgraduate (MA) Open Day Postgraduate
    Sat, 31 Aug '19

How are you feeling about GCSE Results Day?

Hopeful (213)
12.75%
Excited (150)
8.98%
Worried (302)
18.07%
Terrified (374)
22.38%
Meh (154)
9.22%
Confused (37)
2.21%
Putting on a brave face (229)
13.7%
Impatient (212)
12.69%

Watched Threads

View All