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    Could anyone give me a few simple bullet points on this, it's AS biology so nothing too complicated.. Like i'm not sure whether to talk about complimentary base pairs A-T, G-C and stuff like that etc..

    Can anyone help?

    :thrasher:
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    (Original post by stratomaster)
    Could anyone give me a few simple bullet points on this, it's AS biology so nothing too complicated.. Like i'm not sure whether to talk about complimentary base pairs A-T, G-C and stuff like that etc..

    Can anyone help?

    :thrasher:
    Well basically its function is to code for proteins (or bits of RNA).

    You should mention the triplet code - minimum number of bases needed to code for the 20 amino acids in most proteins with 4 bases.
    The complimentary base pairs and double helix structure increase the stability of the molecule and facilitate repair.
    erm, will post more as I think of them
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    It is easily replicated using complementary base pairing (function = to be passed from one generation to another and to all cells in organism)
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    (Original post by oxymoron)
    It is easily replicated using complementary base pairing (function = to be passed from one generation to another and to all cells in organism)
    Another benefit of double stranded DNA also - semi-conservative replication, again reducing errors over RNA replication
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    (Original post by oxymoron)
    It is easily replicated using complementary base pairing (function = to be passed from one generation to another and to all cells in organism)
    And replicated faithfully - edit: damn, beaten

    Its helical structure also allows it to take up less space perhaps?

    There's the major groove for interaction with proteins such as transcription factors?

    Um..
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    DNA complementary to mRNA -> which is complementary to proteins. So DNA's primary structure of amino acid sequence determines protein po.
    Maybe add that 3 hydrogen bonds between G-C, 2 between A-T (further ensure complementary base pairings).
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    How is Dna related to it's function:
    1) It is degenerative. Which means that if say one triplet code mutates by a base sub,add or deletion there is another triplet code that can synthesize the same protein.
    In fact, 64 "codes" are possible for 20 proteins, therefore we got some extra lieing around
    2) the DNA is relativly stable, being in the nucleus and is protected
    3) DNA replication produces exact copies of the intial , (semi conservative) and results in genetic stabilty in the organism
    4) Can unwind by helicase to undergo transcription , to produce mRNA for synthesis of proteins
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    (Original post by dinesh)
    2) the DNA is relativly stable, being in the nucleus and is protected
    The stability is mainly inherent in the molecule. Remember that the nuclear envelope disintegrates during mitosis and meiosis - if the DNA were only kept stable by the nucleus you'd have some problems at that point. The nucleus helps to keep DNA tightly packed in chromatin - and its ability to form chromatin is another useful thing, because it takes up very little space that way and is highly organised (whether it's heterochromatin or euchromatin also determines how accessible it is by polymerases and things, so that's another level of transcriptional control) - but the stability of DNA mainly comes from its structure.
 
 
 

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