Australian Med Schools Watch

Destiny2006
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#1
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Hi, just wondering if anyone knows about them and admissions?
Can you do the course as an immediate undergrad like the UK system or is it similar to the US system whereby you need to do the premed??

Thanks
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Fluffy
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Oz run both systems - at some universities medicine is and undergraduate degree, while at others its post graduate...
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Fluffy
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This should help: http://www.medical-colleges.net/medicine_australia.htm
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Destiny2006
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(Original post by Fluffy)
Oz run both systems - at some universities medicine is and undergraduate degree, while at others its post graduate...

Thanks!! do you know anyone that has decided to go there and do undergrad med??? also do they do a foundation programme like they do here the 6yr course cos i dont have chem a2??
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Catchetat
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(Original post by Destiny2006)
Thanks!! do you know anyone that has decided to go there and do undergrad med??? also do they do a foundation programme like they do here the 6yr course cos i dont have chem a2??
I may consider studying Medicine at AU because it's quite similar to UK course and style. I have some in mind though I don't know which 5 I should choose..... I also want a 'safe' university. Which one might that be?
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LittleOrangeBandaid
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(Original post by Catchetat)
I may consider studying Medicine at AU because it's quite similar to UK course and style. I have some in mind though I don't know which 5 I should choose..... I also want a 'safe' university. Which one might that be?
As far as applications go: they have a separate application per state, so you're not limited to just 5 choices like in UCAS. Some unis (Sydney, Melbourne, QLD) also have provisional entry, where you have a guaranteed place in their med course, but do an undergrad degree at their uni first. but your marks have to be good.
Dunno which is "safe", but NSW is the most competitive, but it's supposed to be the best

(I'm Aussie, btw. Trying to get into UK, haha.)
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Destiny2006
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do you know if they offer a foundation course for medicine similar to the 6year course they do in the uk???
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Catchetat
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(Original post by LittleOrangeBandaid)
As far as applications go: they have a separate application per state, so you're not limited to just 5 choices like in UCAS. Some unis (Sydney, Melbourne, QLD) also have provisional entry, where you have a guaranteed place in their med course, but do an undergrad degree at their uni first. but your marks have to be good.
Dunno which is "safe", but NSW is the most competitive, but it's supposed to be the best

(I'm Aussie, btw. Trying to get into UK, haha.)
Hmmm yea but for the IELTS which most AU unis require, you have to fill in this application form with 5 boxes (universities) so that they can send to those universities your IELTS score....

I'm not sure if you can add more than 5.... Do you know?

I heard NSW is quite good... but I thought Queensland is more competitive (in terms of its requirement.... but ofcourse having high requirement doesn't mean more competitive)

And can you tell me more about privisional entry please? I may look into that if I don't score well on my exams.....
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Eloise2009
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This is a very old thread - but thought I'd add to it anyway for anyone who might look at it in the future.

Predominantly Australia has postgradruate medicine courses (4 years) - anyone with any undergrad degree (min 3 years) can do this provided you do well in the GAMSAT (this is the case for most universities) and then ace the interview which is tough at most universities - lots of scenarios etc. They say to do well in the GAMSAT you need 1st year university physics, chem and biology (I think) - but I have known plenty of people (myself included) who hadn't done these and did very well in the GAMSAT - you just need to do a bit of study leading up to the exam.

The postgrad universities with the old school reputations are Uni of Sydney, Uni of Brisbane and Uni of Melbourne (not 100% sure about that last one - I know one of them in Melbourne has this). They are the "sandstone" universities (I guess comparable to the "red brick" of UK universities, but not nearly in the same league of exclusivity). In Sydney - the other good postgrad course is at the Uni of Notre Dame - it's only been going for a few years, but I've heard rave reviews. My dislike with Notre Dame is that currently they are doing no anatomy and it's entirely PBL which could be tricky if you don't have a good biomed-type undergrad degree - doable though. Either Notre Dame or Sydney would be my first preference (but as a Sydneysider originally, I am biased). UK people might love Perth - pretty much constant sunshine and where all our supermodels seem to come from. It's a lot sleepier than Sydney/Melbourne though. But really, you'll be at university so wherever you are will be awesome.

In terms of undergraduate medicine courses- I know a lot less. You need to do very well in the UMAT (the most ridiculous test in the world) and then ace the interview. There are far fewer of these courses around the country so entry is a lot tougher. Uni of NSW is probably the best (again, take that with a pinch of salt as this is coming from a Sydneysider). The course in Adelaide is meant to be very good. There's one up in Newcastle as well (in NSW, but a smaller city). I don't really know much more. The courses run for about 6 years (?). Like the UK undergrad courses there is an opportunity to intercalate, per se.

A final word of warning to students who will be international students in Australia - the NSW govt (not sure about the other states) will not necessarily guarantee you a job after your degree which is just ridiculous considering technically your training is not completed until after those first couple of postgrad training years in the hospital. It's also ridiculous considering how much money you've just given to the Australian government in tuition fees alone. I'm outraged that we're treating you so badly. Australia needs doctors, yet won't spend the money opening more internship places to train our own junior doctors to fill these positions. Instead it will entice maturer doctors from overseas - the UK in particular.

Rant finished. Good luck if you choose to study in Australia. I'd recommend it any day of the week (says she who is currently studying at Bristol Uni)
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Isaacchan
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Hi, i've researched alot on undergraduate med in Australia. Singaporean student here. (i've gotten a place in uk, but my applications to oz are still pending.)

there are few unis offering undergrad med in oz.

Let's go by state:

Western Aust.:

UWA- 6 year course, int'l students have to complete ISAT (Int'l Student Admissions Test, something like BMAT but w/o the essay.) + Interview.

NSW:

Newcastle Uni- NOt available to applicants, only available to int'l students who complete the foundation studies in Australia.

UNSW- 6 years, no ISAT required, Phone interview, 70(!) places for int
'ls. be warned, very expensive.

Victoria:

Monash- 5 years, ISAT reqd, face to face interview, around 40-50 places. VERY VERY VERY expensive. 2010 fee- A$52,000. (32,000 pounds a year)

Tasmania

Uni of Tas- 5 year, ISAT requd, no interview. 20 places. cheapest uni there is, new clinical building

South Aust:

U Adelaide- 6 yr, PQA required (same one as KCL if im not wrong)

Queensland

UQ- 6 years, provisional entry, first 2 yrs are BA/BSc/BHlthSci, then if your GPA is high enough, (5.0/7 if im not wrong), you progress on to the MB BS the next 4 yrs. ISAT reqd, No interview, 50 places for int'ls.



ISAT is extremely important. you can take it as many times as u want, but the unis will take the lowest score.
Minimum reqd A levels are AAA for UTAS, UNSW, Monash, UQ
AAB for UWA
ABC for Adelaide

TAS and UQ are very results based, so forget abt applying if you got AAB.

Also, I've heard working life as a dr there is less stressful than in UK(?) but definitely less stress than in Singapore, where i come from.

Unfortunately, Housemanship is not guaranteed, but if you do get a place, an Aus PR is pretty easy to get(i've heard)
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ECullen
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(Original post by Catchetat)
I may consider studying Medicine at AU because it's quite similar to UK course and style. I have some in mind though I don't know which 5 I should choose..... I also want a 'safe' university. Which one might that be?
if you don't mind me asking, any regrets going to Keele to study Med?

what are you personal fav's about the course?
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Catchetat
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(Original post by ECullen)
if you don't mind me asking, any regrets going to Keele to study Med?

what are you personal fav's about the course?
i dont know what it's like to study in au but i have no regrets so far. i love the environment and everyone is friendly. students are quite close knit cuz we're a small community.

we also have a ssc period where we get to study an area of our interest. mines' was on MS and it was quite intriguing.

the only thing i dont like about it is that like many students i dont learn much from lectures.

i hope that helps. keele is the way to go!
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ECullen
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(Original post by Catchetat)
i dont know what it's like to study in au but i have no regrets so far. i love the environment and everyone is friendly. students are quite close knit cuz we're a small community.

we also have a ssc period where we get to study an area of our interest. mines' was on MS and it was quite intriguing.

the only thing i dont like about it is that like many students i dont learn much from lectures.

i hope that helps. keele is the way to go!
Awh I think I might firm keele.. Are disaecions waste of time? Is there anything you think is unique to keele medicine?!
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Catchetat
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(Original post by ECullen)
Awh I think I might firm keele.. Are disaecions waste of time? Is there anything you think is unique to keele medicine?!
Depends on the sort of person you are.... personally I find dissections useful as it reinforces book-learning. But it also depends on the tutor you've got on the day.

We do switch dissection tutors so it's not too much to worry about.

On the top of my head the only thing that makes Keele different is the relatively low number of students that get admitted every year... it's good because we build bonds easily
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