BA / BSc Geography Watch

traviie_1992
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#1
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Hiya,
Which A Levels are looked well upon when applying for a Geography degree. (Apart from Geography).
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River85
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Ideally a mix of arts/humanities, social sciences and sciences. Eg. english lit and biology, history and maths, politics and physics, philosophy and chemistry, economics and biology.... For BSc/Physical geography you'll usually need two sciences (geography often counts as one). For BA then you can be a bit flexible. But even if you have an all science or all arts combination you aren't necessarily going to be disadvantaged when it comes to BA/Human geography.

Ultimately check the various prospectus' and chose subjects you enjoy. Moving to the geography forum.
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sweetdarling
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Well i had English, Geography, Biology, French, Art and Advanced Geography.

(Highers and Advanced highers as i'm Scottish but still...)

And i'm doing a BA. (Though was accepted for Bsc courses)
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Kafka is magic
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Human Geography=

Economics
History
Philosophy
Psychology
European Studies
Travel/Tourism
Politics

Physical Geography=

Any science


Regarding English - It may improve your writing skills and considering you will have a lot of essays to write, it could be a good option. Regarding Maths, I really wouldn't bother. You need a basic grasp of statistics mostly and on my degree they teach you these as part of the course.
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LH123
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(Original post by River85)
For BSc/Physical geography you'll usually need two sciences (geography often counts as one).
:nope:

Only a very select few actually ask for sciences.
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TheOneWho
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Having a science will probably help you but not all universities ask for it. If you are more human orientated then essay-based subjects such as English or social science courses would be helpful. Try and get a mix of both, especially if you are going to a university that will allow you to do both human and physical geography.
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LH123
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Well I suppose a science may help a little, but not necessarily. Obviously my case is not indicative of all, but I have three 'art' subjects (History, English lit. and geography) and have received three BSc offers.
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TheOneWho
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(Original post by LH123)
Well I suppose a science may help a little, but not necessarily. Obviously my case is not indicative of all, but I have three 'art' subjects (History, English lit. and geography) and have received three BSc offers.
Unless there are specific requirements then it probably won't matter what subjects you do, I was thinking more for when you are actually at university. A friend of mine is doing earth science and is struggling with the chemistry aspects since she's never really done chemistry before. There are a few people doing glaciation options who are struggling with the basic maths because they haven't kept it up since the penultimate year of secondary school.

Also, depending on the university, a BSc does not mean you would be doing strictly physical geography and a BA strictly human. The subjects overlap and not all physical geography is 'scientific'. My university requires that you do a mix of both human and physical options. Geography is in three faculties (resulting in three different degree types) but there is only one class, the science faculty students are in with the arts and social science faculties.
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LH123
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(Original post by TheOneWho)
Unless there are specific requirements then it probably won't matter what subjects you do, I was thinking more for when you are actually at university. A friend of mine is doing earth science and is struggling with the chemistry aspects since she's never really done chemistry before. There are a few people doing glaciation options who are struggling with the basic maths because they haven't kept it up since the penultimate year of secondary school.

Also, depending on the university, a BSc does not mean you would be doing strictly physical geography and a BA strictly human. The subjects overlap and not all physical geography is 'scientific'. My university requires that you do a mix of both human and physical options. Geography is in three faculties (resulting in three different degree types) but there is only one class, the science faculty students are in with the arts and social science faculties.
Well the OP was talking more, I thought, about specific requirements for geography at university, of which most often there are none.

Of course when a student actually gets to university they may find that some parts are much harder for them than for others as they haven't studied chemistry, or even a humanity, in a long while. I suppose I will reach the same conclusion as I have not done 'proper' sciences since GCSE (even though I was good at them) and no maths since AS level (which I failed miserably due to a lack of work).

I also realised that choosing a BSc does not limit a student to only physical geography and vice versa with a BA. However at most universities, at least of those I looked at applying to/have applied to, taking the BSc route does mean one is expected to take more physical modules even though it is still very possible to maintain a broad interest in geography.
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Grapevine
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(Original post by River85)
Ideally a mix of arts/humanities, social sciences and sciences. Eg. english lit and biology, history and maths, politics and physics, philosophy and chemistry, economics and biology.... For BSc/Physical geography you'll usually need two sciences (geography often counts as one). For BA then you can be a bit flexible. But even if you have an all science or all arts combination you aren't necessarily going to be disadvantaged when it comes to BA/Human geography.

Ultimately check the various prospectus' and chose subjects you enjoy. Moving to the geography forum.
Sound advice right there (other than the highlighted bit). A lot BSc courses don't actually require a science A-level (Southampton, Nottingham and Sheffield's spring to mind) and when they do, they will often class geography as a "science A-level" (Durham accept geography as a science A-level as do Sussex).

Having said all that, taking one or two accompanying subjects will certainly strengthen one's application.

For the BSc course all these A-levels would be useful: biology, chemistry, physics, maths, geology, environmental science. And for a BA course A-levels like sociology, economics, politics, history and English all make good "additional choices".

Overall, just make sure you take geography. Not all universities require it, but the vast majority do, and it will give you a firm grounding in basic concepts whilst providing you with other, obvious, benefits.
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LH123
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#11
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Basically what I said.
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