Career Progression Watch

Porscha!
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#1
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Now I have decided to study Maths I think my first choice of career upon graduation will be teaching.

I understand to train I can do either a one year PGCE or be employed by a school and do a GTP programme

Question is after that what are the career opportunities how as you work up to the roles of head of department head of house and ultimately that of head teacher can you do courses on the job or do you have to go back into full time education to receive more qualifications, how willing are schools in backing ambitious teachers?
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Mr M
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Head of Department and Pastoral Head are different pathways. The usual route would be main scale classroom teacher, teaching and learning responsibility, second in mathematics, head of mathematics, assistant head, deputy head, headteacher. A different possible pathway might be classroom teacher, assistant head of house, head of house, assistant head etc. There are many others.

You don't have to go back into full time education to progress but you will be expected to complete various courses along the way (e..g Leading from the Middle). There is a National Professional Qualification for Headteachers.

Most schools are perfectly happy to back ambitious teachers.
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Angelil
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Most schools don't have head of house...

You can also be head of year, and/or a general member of SMT (senior management team), before becoming a headteacher if you would like to.

There are certainly plenty of opportunities for progression and diversion; examining is a career in itself, for instance.
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caroline_p3
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You don't have to do a PGCE or a GTP you can also do a 1 year SCITT course.
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KayleeLand
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There are sooooooooooooooooo many didferent ways for a teacher to move on up the career ladder!

Concentrate on becoming a teacher first; you can't run before you can walk...
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Interrobang
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You don't have to become a headteacher - I want to train to be a SENCO at a school after a while (unless I do educational psychology at uni)
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Porscha!
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Thankyou for all your advice what is SCITT?
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KayleeLand
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SCITT - is a way of getting into teaching... I'm not clued up though as I've never met anyone doing it

People on here do though, so speak up you SCITTers!
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la fille danse
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(Original post by KayleeLand)
SCITT - is a way of getting into teaching... I'm not clued up though as I've never met anyone doing it

People on here do though, so speak up you SCITTers!
SCITT simply means "school centred initial teacher training". It encompasses any training, GTP or PGCE, that is centred on being in school rather than being in lectures. It is not separate from the GTP or PGCE.
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KayleeLand
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(Original post by la fille danse)
SCITT simply means "school centred initial teacher training". It encompasses any training, GTP or PGCE, that is centred on being in school rather than being in lectures. It is not separate from the GTP or PGCE.
PGCE is not school centred: it is college based.

And I'm on a PGCE but I am certainly not a SCITTer!
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la fille danse
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(Original post by KayleeLand)
PGCE is not school centred: it is college based.

And I'm on a PGCE but I am certainly not a SCITTer!
Read what I wrote again. I didn't say that PGCEs are SCITTS. I said that SCITTS are programmes that are school-centred, be they GTPs or PGCEs.

My course provider is a SCITT provider. It offers programmes that are centred on school training. It offers both the GTP and PGCE. See?

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KayleeLand
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(Original post by la fille danse)
Read what I wrote again. I didn't say that PGCEs are SCITTS. I said that SCITTS are programmes that are school-centred, be they GTPs or PGCEs.

My course provider is a SCITT provider. It offers programmes that are centred on school training. It offers both the GTP and PGCE. See?


No sweetie, it is you who is confusing!

Not all PGCEs are SCITTs, mine isn't. They are just another way of getting QTS, not always culminating in a PGCE.

http://www.tda.gov.uk/Recruit/thetra...ate/scitt.aspx

I reiterate: PGCEs are not school centered.

:eek3:
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la fille danse
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(Original post by KayleeLand)
No sweetie, it is you who is confusing!

Not all PGCEs are SCITTs, mine isn't. They are just another way of getting QTS, not always culminating in a PGCE.

http://www.tda.gov.uk/Recruit/thetra...ate/scitt.aspx

I reiterate: PGCEs are not school centered.

:eek3:
Why are you telling me this?

I didn't suggest that "all PGCEs are SCITTS", you put it. Saying that some SCITTs are PGCEs does not imply that all PGCEs are SCITTs. Not by any stretch of the imagination.

Some PGCEs are school-centred, hence being called SCITTs. The fact that your particular PGCE isn't one doesn't do anything to alter that fact.

Sorry.
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caroline_p3
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ok ok woooah!
Well i am myself a SCITTER!! and it is another way of getting into teaching, rather than a PGCE or a GTP. It is basically the same as a PGCE in you do 4 days a week in a school and one day at a college or university etc, but it is more school centred and caters for local teaching needs in the area it is based. You get QTS at the end of it plus in some cases also a PGCE, and research states that SCITT graduates are more likely to be employed over PGCE graduates because they have more school experience. Because they cater for local teaching needs you are placed in local schools and for me this is where i want to work so it now means by letting to know all the departmental staff etc i stand a good chance of getting a job at a local school.
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KayleeLand
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(Original post by caroline_p3)
ok ok woooah!
Well i am myself a SCITTER!! and it is another way of getting into teaching, rather than a PGCE or a GTP. It is basically the same as a PGCE in you do 4 days a week in a school and one day at a college or university etc, but it is more school centred and caters for local teaching needs in the area it is based. You get QTS at the end of it plus in some cases also a PGCE, and research states that SCITT graduates are more likely to be employed over PGCE graduates because they have more school experience. Because they cater for local teaching needs you are placed in local schools and for me this is where i want to work so it now means by letting to know all the departmental staff etc i stand a good chance of getting a job at a local school.

A SCITT is nothing like a PGCE! PGCEs are in college, and to point out to the other SCITTer, even if a SCITT culminates in PGCE status it is not the same route taken as a normal PGCE student would take.

Research generally states PGCEs are more favoured:

"PGCE probably the safest in terms of status in employers eyes"
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brak3n
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I always considered PGCE, GTP, and SCITT three different routes:
PGCE - study at university with some of the year on placement, get both PGCE and QTS
GTP - work in a school, get paid, get the professional qualification (QTS) but not the academic qualification (PGCE)
SCITT - based in a school, but also spend some time in university, get both PGCE and QTS at the end.

(Of course getting the qualifications is also based on passing.)

GTP is obviously a school centred route in that it's based in a school, but I don't consider that makes it the official SCITT route.
This is my interpretation based upon what I have heard at 'Routes into Teaching' presentation by the TDA, from what I have read on the TDA website, and from what I have read on university website when researching where I wanted to apply to for my teacher training.
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caroline_p3
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(Original post by KayleeLand)
A SCITT is nothing like a PGCE! PGCEs are in college, and to point out to the other SCITTer, even if a SCITT culminates in PGCE status it is not the same route taken as a normal PGCE student would take.

Research generally states PGCEs are more favoured:

"PGCE probably the safest in terms of status in employers eyes"

Maybe you want to read some proper educational academic papers and then see what route is favoured!!! To say SCITT is nothing like a PGCE is wrong, they are very similar. Since i have done both i CAN compare!!!
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la fille danse
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(Original post by KayleeLand)
A SCITT is nothing like a PGCE! PGCEs are in college, and to point out to the other SCITTer, even if a SCITT culminates in PGCE status it is not the same route taken as a normal PGCE student would take.

Research generally states PGCEs are more favoured:

"PGCE probably the safest in terms of status in employers eyes"
How odd that you would say that you're not "clued up on SCITTs", ask for input from people on SCITTs.... and then insist that you know more about them than anyone else who has posted.
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KayleeLand
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(Original post by la fille danse)
How odd that you would say that you're not "clued up on SCITTs", ask for input from people on SCITTs.... and then insist that you know more about them than anyone else who has posted.
I just googled it you see :p:

And even though I still don't know a **** about SCHITTs, what I do know is that a PGCE is better :p:
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KayleeLand
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(Original post by caroline_p3)
Maybe you want to read some proper educational academic papers and then see what route is favoured!!! To say SCITT is nothing like a PGCE is wrong, they are very similar. Since i have done both i CAN compare!!!

The TES is the best.

Why would anyone do both? :eek3:
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