Tummy and lower abdomen Watch

strawberry
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I'm just wondering if there's a way to work out your lower abs when you have a metal rod in your back? If there isn't, then yeah I expected that answer, but if there is a way, suggestions?
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Bebbs
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Depends on how mobile your back is to be honest. Hanging Leg/knee raises would be better than situps/crunches.

If not, the old adage that a strong presser has strong abs.
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strawberry
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well the back isn't very mobile from the waist down - to the point where picking things up from the ground requires time and squatting
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teriaki
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(Original post by strawberry)
I'm just wondering if there's a way to work out your lower abs when you have a metal rod in your back? If there isn't, then yeah I expected that answer, but if there is a way, suggestions?
There are no such things as lower abs. All of your abs are one muscle and different exercises can't target different parts of it.
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AlphaTango
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(Original post by teriaki)
There are no such things as lower abs. All of your abs are one muscle and different exercises can't target different parts of it.
********.

Edit: Wouldnt let me say BS on swear thingy
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ch0c0h01ic
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(Original post by strawberry)
I'm just wondering if there's a way to work out your lower abs when you have a metal rod in your back? If there isn't, then yeah I expected that answer, but if there is a way, suggestions?
Planks - normal and side. Add external weight gradually when you can comfortably do 2+ mins and/or try one arm one leg variations, etc.
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teriaki
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(Original post by ChrisLincoln)
********.

Edit: Wouldnt let me say BS on swear thingy
Why are you trying to say b.s? There are no lower abs. I am sorry to have burst the bubble of your fairy tale.


From: http://findarticles.com/p/articles/m...s_/ai_12695243
The phrase lower abdominal implies one abdominal wall muscle, rectus abdominus, is lower than the others. This is not true. Each has attachment sites on the pubic bones. No one of them is any lower than the others. If the words lower abdominals refer to the lower half of the rectus abdominus, it implies the lower half of a muscle can contract without its upper half being affected. This is impossible due to the structural construction of muscles.

To understand the abdominal muscles it is vital to understand the basics of skeletal muscles. A muscle has at least two ends. These ends attach directly, or by way of a tendon, to at least two separate bones. Each muscle crosses at least one joint. When the muscle contracts it either causes the joint between the two bones to flex (bend) or extend (straighten). One end of the muscle, referred to as its origin, is usually stable and doesn't move. The other end, called the insertion, usually moves when the muscle contracts.

The meaty part of the muscle is made of fibers which stretch from the origin to the insertion. The long fibers in the abdominal muscle go from the origin (on the ribs and xiphoid process) to the insertion site (on the pubic symphysis). A concentric contraction, in curl-ups or sit-ups, is performed as the two ends move close together. For full range of motion to occur on each repetition of the exercise, the muscle relaxes and allows its two ends to move apart and regain resting length.

THE ALL OR NOTHING PRINCIPLE OF MUSCLE CONTRACTION

The two ends of the rectus abdominus move toward each other, or one end can hold still while the other end moves. They may switch duties, or they both may move toward the middle. But the entire length of the muscle fiber is always involved no matter which end is mobile.

The all or nothing principle pertains to the length of a muscle fiber, not to all the fibers of a muscle. One fiber may contract while a nearby fiber is not, but the fiber which is contracting is committed along its entire length. A muscle fiber cannot contract along only half its length.

Imagine a stretched rubber band representing the rectus abdominus. As the rubber band shortens to its resting length the entire band is involved in the shortening process. This is similar to the way the muscle contracts along its entire length. For one end of the muscle to move, it must be pulled upon from the anchored end at the origin site. Hence, the lower end of the abdominal muscle cannot contract without affecting the rest of the length of fiber.
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ch0c0h01ic
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(Original post by ChrisLincoln)
********.

Edit: Wouldnt let me say BS on swear thingy
It's the truth.

Your obliques, rectus, transversus, etc are all sheet muscles which all originate on or around the ribcage and insert on or around the pelvis. It is impossible to completely isolate your 'upper' or 'lower' abs, they work as a unit.
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AlphaTango
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The two ends of the rectus abdominus move toward each other, or one end can hold still while the other end moves. They may switch duties, or they both may move toward the middle. But the entire length of the muscle fiber is always involved no matter which end is mobile.
From your own article. Admitting you can make the lower part work harder than the upper part or the other way round.

Hence, if you do leg lifts. The lower part of RA hurts like a ******* and the upper is hardly affected.

Hence, if you do crunches. The upper part of RA hurts like a ******* and the lower is hardly affected.

Yes the entire muscle is "involved" but different areas of the muscle can be worked.

Hence how variations in exercise improve muscles. I.e if you do barbell bench press everyday of your life. You won't gain that much after the initial gain. But then if you do dumbell flies, it produces more strain on a different areas of your pecs and other nearby muscles.

If they are all one muscle and you cant isolate areas of it, how can you have a "4 pack"? Surely the entire muscle would be the same definition.

PS. I know they have the same insert and origins and you can't completely isolate upper/lower. But you can work upper or lower harder depending on the exercise.
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strawberry
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hmm ... so gym work is still doable. It's a problem because a gut's beginning to form.
I'm unfamiliar with whatever gym equipment so ..
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teriaki
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(Original post by ChrisLincoln)
From your own article. Admitting you can make the lower part work harder than the upper part or the other way round.

Hence, if you do leg lifts. The lower part of RA hurts like a ******* and the upper is hardly affected.

Hence, if you do crunches. The upper part of RA hurts like a ******* and the lower is hardly affected.

Yes the entire muscle is "involved" but different areas of the muscle can be worked.

Hence how variations in exercise improve muscles. I.e if you do barbell bench press everyday of your life. You won't gain that much after the initial gain. But then if you do dumbell flies, it produces more strain on a different areas of your pecs and other nearby muscles.

If they are all one muscle and you cant isolate areas of it, how can you have a "4 pack"? Surely the entire muscle would be the same definition.

PS. I know they have the same insert and origins and you can't completely isolate upper/lower. But you can work upper or lower harder depending on the exercise.
Although variation regarding exercises is always welcome, you seem to have missed out the key part in the very thing you quoted from that article:

the entire length of the muscle fiber is always involved no matter which end is mobile.
The ENTIRE muscle is involved.

And if I am not mistaken, the reason some have a 4 pack instead of a six pack is because they got fat on their abs, not because some part of their abs are massively disproportionate compared to others.
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ch0c0h01ic
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(Original post by strawberry)
hmm ... so gym work is still doable. It's a problem because a gut's beginning to form.
I'm unfamiliar with whatever gym equipment so ..
You're going to sort that with exercise and dieting, not abs exercises.
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AlphaTango
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(Original post by teriaki)
Although variation regarding exercises is always welcome, you seem to have missed out the key part in the very thing you quoted from that article:


The ENTIRE muscle is involved.

And if I am not mistaken, the reason some have a 4 pack instead of a six pack is because they got fat on their abs, not because some part of their abs are massively disproportionate compared to others.

The ENTIRE muscle is involved. True. But it's not involved to the same extent depending on the exercise.

And yeah you may be right about the 4 pack thing. But my "upper abs" certaintly feel stronger than my lower.
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AlphaTango
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(Original post by strawberry)
hmm ... so gym work is still doable. It's a problem because a gut's beginning to form.
I'm unfamiliar with whatever gym equipment so ..
Agreed with above abs exercise wont help you loose weight on your abs ^^, i find that running is the best way to keep my "gut" flat.
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strawberry
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I know, but the only reason why the gut is there is because of the rod in the back making that area basically immobile and not getting the workout the rest of the body has.
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ch0c0h01ic
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(Original post by strawberry)
I know, but the only reason why the gut is there is because of the rod in the back making that area basically immobile and not getting the workout the rest of the body has.
Wrong again. You cannot spot reduce fat.

The reason you're getting a gut is because you've got a calorific excess, you're eating more calories than you are burning, and so these excess calories get stored as fat. Where are the main areas of adipose tissue in females? The stomach, hips, arse, etc.

How do you shift these excess calories then? Eat less and/or exercise more, not abs exercises.
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Diaz89
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"tummy"-cute
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Prudence Slutsky
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How about jumping rope? It will help you reduce all-over body fat and, if you add twists you'll be working your obliques too! I found this video quite helpful --> http://uk.youtube.com/watch?v=ZQuRhNpJKVU

Also, for general ab-toning, suck your stomach in and hold for 30 seconds-1 min at a time. You can do this while waiting in a queue or talking on the phone etc. You'll feel a burn if you're doing it right
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strawberry
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so why's the rest of the body lean then?
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ch0c0h01ic
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(Original post by strawberry)
so why's the rest of the body lean then?
1. Women naturally carry fat around their stomach and hips

2. You could have bloating

3. You could have water retention

4. You have could have a poor posture

5. You think you are fatter/have a fatter stomach than you actually do

6. A combination of the above.
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