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Should I give up Football? watch

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    Okay, so I've always been a sraight A student (I'm in year 13 at the moment) and I've always been a great footballer (as many have said). I have always had a passion for football, and have played it since I can remember.

    I have played for many clubs at semi-professional level; I've played for Dagenham and Redbridge under 16s, and subsequently Millwall under 18s. Halfway through year 12 however, I had a really bad injury and had to stop playing for a while.

    Inevitably during this period, schoolwork was prioritised and as I lacked the fitness after injury I was released by Millwall. I joined another semi-professional team, Beaumont Athletic, and although my aspirations of making it as a Pro had been dismantled, I continued playing because of my passion. A lot of things happened in the summer though, I went on holiday for 4 weeks, and a month after my return, I went back on holiday for 2 weeks.

    Im still playing for Beaumont however, but due to a lack of fitness, Im finding it hard to get in to the team. This has been the case for 2 months or so, and during this period, my passion for playing football, in terms of training etc has deteriorated badly. Im struggling for fitness, cannot get into the team and am at odds with the manager.

    Most of my friends have quit football, and as I see training etc as a chore, coupled with the fact that university beckons, I have thought of giving it up. Problem is though, that I can't because I still have some passion fo the game deep down.

    So should I?

    Sorry for the long post.
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    what uni you going to as its great to play at uni not only as a sport but great socially as you will meet so many people
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    It's up to you.

    If it was me, no, being dropped would only motivate me to get better and get in the team. Don't be a quitter. Although if you were really serious about it you wouldn't have dropped your fitness so much.
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    (Original post by dan_s91)
    what uni you going to as its great to play at uni not only as a sport but great socially as you will meet so many people
    Hopefully the LSE to study Law.
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    LSE trials are ridiculous tbh
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    I would definitely keep up with football, and try and get as far as you can with it. I was a future prospect for the 2012 Olympics for swimming but I decided to just concentrate on work, I look back sometimes and maybe regret it.. I really enjoyed it, and to be honest I'd love to be fantastic at football :p:
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    And you get a scholarship from your uni to help fund your training, etc to make you the best you can be.
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    (Original post by fisherman)
    It's up to you.

    If it was me, no, being dropped would only motivate me to get better and get in the team. Don't be a quitter. Although if you were really serious about it you wouldn't have dropped your fitness so much.
    Yes, I've tried to motivate myself, but I feel like a veteran (Dean Windass springs to mind) and feel like my playing days are over. I feel that had I been fully fit, I'd be in the team, but with college and work, I don't have much time for fitness apart from training.
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    (Original post by Waterstorm)
    I would definitely keep up with football, and try and get as far as you can with it. I was a future prospect for the 2012 Olympics for swimming but I decided to just concentrate on work, I look back sometimes and maybe regret it.. I really enjoyed it, and to be honest I'd love to be fantastic at football :p:
    Yeah I understand what you mean, I regret my injury at Millwall, beacause it not only ruined my chances of making it as a Pro, I was arguaby in the form of my life at the time, so look back with some regret. :o:
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    (Original post by Waterstorm)
    I would definitely keep up with football, and try and get as far as you can with it. I was a future prospect for the 2012 Olympics for swimming but I decided to just concentrate on work, I look back sometimes and maybe regret it.. I really enjoyed it, and to be honest I'd love to be fantastic at football :p:
    What? I'm a runner myself and the only thing I should do is run and study and I have the time for both. It's hard to believe that one cannot have time for sports because studies.
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    (Original post by Sephirona)
    What? I'm a runner myself and the only thing I should do is run and study and I have the time for both. It's hard to believe that one cannot have time for sports because studies.
    The amount of training I had was too much for me.
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    I know exactly how you are feeling(except with the injury). I play semi-pro for u18 but now im in y13 and due to the fact i have to spend a lot of time with school , i get the same feeling as football training becoming a chore and I am close to quitting because as school work gets tougher, training becomes more intense and im startin to feel like a workhorse although ive got a great passion for football too. I have decided to continue training but stop playing matches and the coach allows me.
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    (Original post by Waterstorm)
    The amount of training I had was too much for me.
    I honestly understand as I'm in intensive training myself. But you could have sacraficed something in order to keep up with your studies. For instance one hour less? Anything could have helped. We waste a lot of time in our lives.
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    Drop down to a good team at amateur level, or even sunday league (no training).
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    (Original post by Sephirona)
    I honestly understand as I'm in intensive training myself. But you could have sacraficed something in order to keep up with your studies. For instance one hour less? Anything could have helped. We waste a lot of time in our lives.
    Yeah, I know.. that's why I look back at it and think that I probably should have. I just swim for a club now.. nothing too intense, I think I've lost a bit of speed though, lol.
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    If your passion for the game deep down is still respondent then it would be a great pity to totally give up just because currently you feel training to be a chore. You've had some nasty injury issues and that can seriously effect motivation, so I have a great deal of sympathy for you in this case.

    Nonetheless, training will beget greater confidence and massage the passion you still retain. This is provided any medical reports show it not to cause potential lasting damage, of course. Even if you feel going pro is extremely unlikely then wishing to play the game for passion's sake still requires passionate investment; it's circular. No matter what level of the game one plays at, you can always do beautiful things with the ball provided you care about it.

    The fact you are at odds with your manager and having difficulty getting into the team is not necessarily an infallible challenge. Offer the man a capable pair of feet able to get him points and he's not likely to care about anything else - but you must work hard. So if training is a chore, my advice would be to accept that. Maybe it is a chore. There's a temptation perhaps to feel guilty if you profess to love the game so much that you see training as more trouble than it's worth, but all part of the process is being prepared to work hard. Again, I have a lot of sympathy for you after what has happened, but what do you see that says you should give up playing the game for the game's sake? Champions fight their own inner impulses to abhor obstacles, even if the opponent is not necessarily as threatening, and actively seek such challenges to an extent.

    I would suggest that you accept you may not have the motivation to train as heavily as you did, but also the reasons why that exists. Give preference to your passion and allow breathing room for circumstance. You're not being asked to climb Everest, nor is it expected of you. But you can still be a champion of your own domain and respond to the passion inside of you. That you can still very much do - but it is a matter of choice. You've seen a number of obstacles and you are perhaps to a degree tired of it. If your passion can in any way override that tiredness then I urge you, within reason, to respond maximally.

    Work hard on your fitness. Make every available opportunity for yourself to overcome your own impulses against giving up as long as that passion exists. Respond to it. Go to training, and deliberately make it difficult for yourself if no straight forward opportunities present themselves. Demonstrate if not to those around then to yourself that you deserve a chance to play the game you love.

    Be aware that for all the talent in the world, champions don't appear without those factors being inherent in their very fibre and being. Even if you may not be a future champion of the wider world, you can be a champion of your own - it stands as no smaller an achievement provided you fight for what you love.

    That is the choice you must make.
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    (Original post by LaSagna)
    Drop down to a good team at amateur level, or even sunday league (no training).
    Amateur level was an option, but the level of football I would be playing would not be worth my time. (Without sounding too arrogant) And also, if i stopped at semi-pro level, I'd probably quit altogether..

    Besides, I love the atmosphere prior to a match, playing at stadiums, and having to wear suits etc before matches. It adds to the passion.....
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    (Original post by Waterstorm)
    Yeah, I know.. that's why I look back at it and think that I probably should have. I just swim for a club now.. nothing too intense, I think I've lost a bit of speed though, lol.
    It's good that you haven't given up. You're still a youngster (I read in your profile that you're 17) and you can definitely accomplish a lot if you put your mind to it. Don't let your talent go to waste.
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    (Original post by Hubert Poo)
    If your passion for the game deep down is still respondent then it would be a great pity to totally give up just because currently you feel training to be a chore. You've had some nasty injury issues and that can seriously effect motivation, so I have a great deal of sympathy for you in this case.

    Nonetheless, training will beget greater confidence and massage the passion you still retain. This is provided any medical reports show it not to cause potential lasting damage, of course. Even if you feel going pro is extremely unlikely then wishing to play the game for passion's sake still requires passionate investment; it's circular. No matter what level of the game one plays at, you can always do beautiful things with the ball provided you care about it.

    The fact you are at odds with your manager and having difficulty getting into the team is not necessarily an infallible challenge. Offer the man a capable pair of feet able to get him points and he's not likely to care about anything else - but you must work hard. So if training is a chore, my advice would be to accept that. Maybe it is a chore. There's a temptation perhaps to feel guilty if you profess to love the game so much that you see training as more trouble than it's worth, but all part of the process is being prepared to work hard. Again, I have a lot of sympathy for you after what has happened, but what do you see that says you should give up playing the game for the game's sake? Champions fight their own inner impulses to abhor obstacles, even if the opponent is not necessarily as threatening, and actively seek such challenges to an extent.

    I would suggest that you accept you may not have the motivation to train as heavily as you did, but also the reasons why that exists. Give preference to your passion and allow breathing room for circumstance. You're not being asked to climb Everest, nor is it expected of you. But you can still be a champion of your own domain and respond to the passion inside of you. That you can still very much do - but it is a matter of choice. You've seen a number of obstacles and you are perhaps to a degree tired of it. If your passion can in any way override that tiredness then I urge you, within reason, to respond maximally.

    Work hard on your fitness. Make every available opportunity for yourself to overcome your own impulses against giving up as long as that passion exists. Respond to it. Go to training, and deliberately make it difficult for yourself if no straight forward opportunities present themselves. Demonstrate if not to those around then to yourself that you deserve a chance to play the game you love.

    Be aware that for all the talent in the world, champions don't appear without those factors being inherent in their very fibre and being. Even if you may not be a future champion of the wider world, you can be a champion of your own - it stands as no smaller an achievement provided you fight for what you love.

    That is the choice you must make.
    Thank you so much. That is quite literally an amazing post.

    I didn't include this in my opening paragraph, but another reason why I have continued to play was becasue I wanted to challenge myself. I tend to quit things when they get too hard, and often do not stand up to challenges which come my way in life in general.

    Perhaps I am not working hard enough. Perhaps I lack the dedication and commitment of champions. And perhaps I wasnt the player I once was.

    But what I guess really motivates me is to not live with regret in the future, and think back when I'm older that I quit football - and was not prepard to fight for my undying love for the game.

    Thank you again for the post.
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    (Original post by Ruhell)
    Yeah I understand what you mean, I regret my injury at Millwall, beacause it not only ruined my chances of making it as a Pro, I was arguaby in the form of my life at the time, so look back with some regret. :o:
    Give it up if you want then.

    I'll just point out that almost every world class player has had serious injuries to overcome, and they managed to overcome them and still be the best.
 
 
 
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