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Early Modern and Late Modern Childrens Stories watch

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    Does anyone know the titles of any Childrens stories written in Early Modern and Late Modern English.

    I need them in their original styles of grammar and lexis.
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    (Original post by high_maintenance_girl)
    Does anyone know the titles of any Childrens stories written in Early Modern and Late Modern English.

    I need them in their original styles of grammar and lexis.
    You don't really get children's books as such until the late(ish) 17th century, so finding something "early modern" might be quite tricky. What you will find are texts like Foxe's Book of Martyrs and Pilgrim's Progress for which there is plenty of evidence that they were read by children (and fondly remembered for decades afterwards), but they're not technically "children's stories", of course. Come to think of it, though, I'm pretty sure Bunyan also wrote something which was specifically advertised as a children's book, called A Book for Boys and Girls, or something very similar. It's mainly rhymes, though, I think, so it may not be the sort of thing you're looking for.:dontknow:

    Edit: hang on, on second thoughts I probably misunderstood you there... You don't actually mean "Early Modern" as in post-medieval, do you? You're probably looking for something from the late 19th to early 20th century, i.e. Alcott, Burnett, Henty, Haggard, etc. to compare to more recent children's fiction. Ahem.:o:
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    (Original post by high_maintenance_girl)
    Does anyone know the titles of any Childrens stories written in Early Modern and Late Modern English.

    I need them in their original styles of grammar and lexis.
    Why would you need such things?

    And (irrelevant as this may seem) where do you come from?
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    (Original post by Tootles)
    Why would you need such things?

    And (irrelevant as this may seem) where do you come from?

    A2 English Language Coursework lol
    And I come from England - West Midlands to be more precise.
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    (Original post by hobnob)
    You don't really get children's books as such until the late(ish) 17th century, so finding something "early modern" might be quite tricky. What you will find are texts like Foxe's Book of Martyrs and Pilgrim's Progress for which there is plenty of evidence that they were read by children (and fondly remembered for decades afterwards), but they're not technically "children's stories", of course. Come to think of it, though, I'm pretty sure Bunyan also wrote something which was specifically advertised as a children's book, called A Book for Boys and Girls, or something very similar. It's mainly rhymes, though, I think, so it may not be the sort of thing you're looking for.:dontknow:

    Edit: hang on, on second thoughts I probably misunderstood you there... You don't actually mean "Early Modern" as in post-medieval, do you? You're probably looking for something from the late 19th to early 20th century, i.e. Alcott, Burnett, Henty, Haggard, etc. to compare to more recent children's fiction. Ahem.:o:
    Well from what I've been taught at A-level

    Early Modern is from 1450 - 1700 - wishful thinking for actually hoping there might be some childrens literature available

    Late Modern is 1700+ : I need a text that has a lot of differences when compared with todays literature; not only in just the language aspects but also in the more social aspects such as gender roles and attitudes to language and things like that.

    And I will research what you've mentioned so far - thanks
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    (Original post by high_maintenance_girl)
    Well from what I've been taught at A-level

    Early Modern is from 1450 - 1700 - wishful thinking for actually hoping there might be some childrens literature available

    Late Modern is 1700+ : I need a text that has a lot of differences when compared with todays literature; not only in just the language aspects but also in the more social aspects such as gender roles and attitudes to language and things like that.

    And I will research what you've mentioned so far - thanks
    Well, as I said, you'll have trouble finding something written before about 1650, because you don't really get children's books, only primers, alphabets, catechisms etc., and I don't think those would really work for that sort of question.:dontknow:

    For the 1700+ range, though, you might try Richardson's Pamela - originally aimed at girls aged about 14-16, but widely read (and approved of) by adults as well. It should also be interesting to look at for the "social aspects".
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    (Original post by high_maintenance_girl)
    A2 English Language Coursework lol
    And I come from England - West Midlands to be more precise.
    Okay - does the literature have to be authentic, or just in that flavour of English?
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    (Original post by Tootles)
    Okay - does the literature have to be authentic, or just in that flavour of English?
    Okay excuse my ignorance, but what do you mean?
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    (Original post by high_maintenance_girl)
    Okay excuse my ignorance, but what do you mean?
    I mean: something that was composed all that time ago, or written recently in that type of language? Are you studying it for the language or the history?
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    I'm studying it for the language; but i will need to also consider in other aspects that will have affected the language.

    Well, preferably something that was written all that time ago, but if it is written recently but using a olden language style, then that would be great.

    (that was very bad english then lol)
 
 
 
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