RAF : Officer / Pilot Entry Watch

BlackHawk
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#3321
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#3321
(Original post by Wzz)
Which in-depth test? Are you thinking of corneal mapping etc?
that would be the one!
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dirts
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#3322
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#3322
(Original post by carrierlanding)
i thought there were 4 variants of tristar in service. at least thats the impression i gained from my mate who flys them.....
Fair enough, I switch off when my tri mates start talking about all their variants...
Most of our jets are in a wide variety of modification states by now, developed by the fluid worldwide political environment. I'm sure no 2 tristars are the same!
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dirts
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#3323
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#3323
(Original post by Wzz)
Maybe 8-12 hours in the front of an F3, but it's just a bigger, heavier aeroplane at the end of the day.
Just??!!
Hmph. Suppose you're right.

(Original post by Wzz)
Still, I wouldn't fancy it, so it was a brave choice. I bet they were being advised to chuck it into the sea and get out.
Probably not. Unless they only had one mainwheel...I can't remember the details now.
Btw, a GR4 at Lossie was put on the deck with only a main and the nosewheel a couple of days ago...
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dirts
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#3324
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#3324
(Original post by nikolai)
Hey guys,

sorry, i'm a studentroom n00b...so no doubt this post is hidden away somewhere.

I got accepted for Pilot Scholarship a while back, and have finally finished 6th year, part 2 medicals and familiarisation. April 3rd is the start of our IOT course and it would be greatly appreciated if anyone has any information or useful tips for IOT? :eek:

Thanks,

Nick
Just keep your nose clean! It's not that bad - remember, it's only 6 months...even if you get recoursed (which probably seems like the biggest thing in the world at the time), then you only do 2 more months (hopefully!) which really is nothing in the grand scheme of things. Your mates who finish before you will probably hold somewhere for that time!
And for my money, no matter how many times they tell you not to be, be the grey man!! Unless you're a golden balls and want to go for the sword, it probably ain't worth it! A friend of mine decided he would be honest and air his true views on his mid course assessment and got an absolute shoeing for it! Almost got recoursed for attitude! You'll get plenty of chances to have your say afterwards, for IOT just let them hear what they want to hear!
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Scorg
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#3325
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#3325
(Original post by Wzz)
He'll have had a couple of tours in the back, 60 hours "front" seat Tutor, 140 in Tucano, and 100-ish in Hawk. Maybe 8-12 hours in the front of an F3, but it's just a bigger, heavier aeroplane at the end of the day.
Ahh, Got you know, its the total amount of flight hours rather then the type hours.

[quoe]Still, I wouldn't fancy it, so it was a brave choice. I bet they were being advised to chuck it into the sea and get out.[/QUOTE]

going from memory of the incident, I think that was one of the options they had before deciding on the belly landing.
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Scorg
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#3326
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#3326
(Original post by dirts)
Just??!!
Hmph. Suppose you're right.
all in the detail really


Probably not. Unless they only had one mainwheel...I can't remember the details now.
Btw, a GR4 at Lossie was put on the deck with only a main and the nosewheel a couple of days ago...
the F3 was a total belly landing, complete undercarrage failure.
the Lossie GR4 was what started this conversation, it just happened to remind me of the leuchars F3 incident
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hayelz81
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#3327
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#3327
(Original post by dirts)
And for my money, no matter how many times they tell you not to be, be the grey man!! Unless you're a golden balls and want to go for the sword, it probably ain't worth it! A friend of mine decided he would be honest and air his true views on his mid course assessment and got an absolute shoeing for it! Almost got recoursed for attitude! You'll get plenty of chances to have your say afterwards, for IOT just let them hear what they want to hear!
Maybe I am missing something here, but what does "grey man" mean? Is it to not air your opinions too strongly throughout IOT? I think it is worth it for the 6 month, yes I can see that point of view.
What was it that your friend fed back to the training board that they did not like?
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hayelz81
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#3328
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#3328
(Original post by nikolai)
thanks it'll be a relief to finally start (not to mention finishing my crap retail job at the moment lol)
Can I ask opinion, talking about crappy stop-gap jobs: Obviously very few of us are in privileged enough a position not to be employed whilst waiting to hear from the RAF.

I was in a job that I really liked last year, but the hours were a bit random, and varied from week to week. One of the main reasons I left this was that these hours did not permit me to go to the gym/keep fit regularly enough to maintain fitness for the RAF.

Should I be honest about this when asked in interview about reason for leaving? I am now in a pretty good job (just 9-5) and have been promoted within 2 months of starting. This gives me evenings and weekends free to keep fit. Are extra-work activities more important than current job?

I have not told my current employers about my RAF application, as this could jeopardize my future chances of promotion or improvement. Does anyone else have something similar? I dont like having to keep it a "secret" - although close friends and family know of course!

Or am I being weird? (rhetorical question...)
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ThomA2
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#3329
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#3329
You should always be honest in the interview without exception. I'd be surprised if they asked you why you left one job for another; they are not particularly interested in your current job, the fact that you have one is good enough. You may face a question or two such as "do you enjoy your job?" but no more. They are just trying to get to know you, not quiz you on your reasons for making every decision you've ever made.
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Wzz
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#3330
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#3330
(Original post by dirts)
Fair enough, I switch off when my tri mates start talking about all their variants...
Only have a couple of Tri* mates and I switch off when one starts talking about anything, really :P
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Nikki J S
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#3331
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#3331
(Original post by hayelz81)
I was in a job that I really liked last year, but the hours were a bit random, and varied from week to week. One of the main reasons I left this was that these hours did not permit me to go to the gym/keep fit regularly enough to maintain fitness for the RAF.

Should I be honest about this when asked in interview about reason for leaving? I am now in a pretty good job (just 9-5) and have been promoted within 2 months of starting. This gives me evenings and weekends free to keep fit. Are extra-work activities more important than current job?

I have not told my current employers about my RAF application, as this could jeopardize my future chances of promotion or improvement. Does anyone else have something similar? I dont like having to keep it a "secret" - although close friends and family know of course!

Or am I being weird? (rhetorical question...)
I was in a similar position last year. I took a part-time job through summer, but left when starting back at college because it was too much with all my other commitments. When asked about it in my interview, I was just honest about it; something had to give, and the part-time job was the least of my priorities. They didn't seem to mind and didn't really question it, so I wouldn't worry to much about it;you should be fine
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Wzz
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#3332
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#3332
(Original post by dirts)
Just??!!
Hmph. Suppose you're right.
Hey, no offence meant at all; but the stick still works roughly the same way as anything else, and with his level of experience in the back and the staff mate he had with him, I'm sure they were fairly happy to give it a shot.


(Original post by dirts)
Probably not. Unless they only had one mainwheel...I can't remember the details now.
Btw, a GR4 at Lossie was put on the deck with only a main and the nosewheel a couple of days ago...
As mentioned, they had no wheels at all. The banter at the time (I arrived to hold with them a mo after) was that getting out was seen to be the best option, but they thought they'd give it a crack. The staff nav's retired now; bet that's a nice one for the end of the logbook!
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Wzz
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#3333
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#3333
(Original post by dirts)
And for my money, no matter how many times they tell you not to be, be the grey man!! Unless you're a golden balls and want to go for the sword, it probably ain't worth it! A friend of mine decided he would be honest and air his true views on his mid course assessment and got an absolute shoeing for it!
Yeah, it's not worth being completely honest all the time; but I don't think you have to be completely grey. You can have a little bit of personality about you, just don't take the piss with it, don't be the guy always in the bar, and never ever even think about argueing....!
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Wzz
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#3334
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#3334
(Original post by hayelz81)
Maybe I am missing something here, but what does "grey man" mean? Is it to not air your opinions too strongly throughout IOT?
Pretty much. Fade into the background; be "just another guy on the course."
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Wzz
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#3335
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#3335
(Original post by hayelz81)
I was in a job that I really liked last year, but the hours were a bit random, and varied from week to week. One of the main reasons I left this was that these hours did not permit me to go to the gym/keep fit regularly enough to maintain fitness for the RAF.

Should I be honest about this when asked in interview about reason for leaving?
As said, you should be utterly honest about everything in the interview. Why would you think that an interviewer wouldn't like that as an answer?

As Nikki mentioned, it's not a problem if you're busy and you have to bin something; and if the job is the easiest one to stop, or the least important, that's fine.
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Wzz
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#3336
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#3336
(Original post by ThomA2)
I'd be surprised if they asked you why you left one job for another; they are not particularly interested in your current job, the fact that you have one is good enough. You may face a question or two such as "do you enjoy your job?" but no more. They are just trying to get to know you, not quiz you on your reasons for making every decision you've ever made.
... but they are trying to see how your brain works, and it's an interesting question. If in someone's employment history, they were only at a job a couple of months, I'd definately ask why they left.
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ThomA2
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#3337
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#3337
That's a fair point, and in hayelz81's case the honest answer is the ideal answer.

Whether it was because my employment history has little out of the ordinary or not I don't know, but they really did gloss over work and focussed much more on extra-curricular activities.
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cwarranto
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#3338
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#3338
:changedirectionoftopic:

I was asked my opinion last week by someone who had been told that a mutual friend (read, their friend, not mine) had been back-coursed at OASC.

The reason given for back-coursing was their assesment was TOO good, and they weren't being challeneged enough. Does this fit in with anyones exerpeince or conversations?

Me, i'm a bit sceptical about it. Why would they penalise someone for being the mutts nutts? Especially throw them back a course. I'm suspicious theres an exam fail or injury being covered up in the background.
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Juji
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#3339
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#3339
Pretty much. Fade into the background; be "just another guy on the course."
That's exactly what they are NOT looking for. Who'd want an RAF Officer who was afraid to speak their mind?
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Juji
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#3340
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#3340
The reason given for back-coursing was their assesment was TOO good, and they weren't being challeneged enough. Does this fit in with anyones exerpeince or conversations?
LMAO....that's a novel excuse for being re-flighted! Complete and utter b0ll0cks. It costs £££'s to re-flight people and is only done when people aren't keeping pace with the course (i.e. failing).

Passing IOT, then Spec trg, and life as an Officer will provide enough challenge for anyone.
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