ben_2mk
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#341
Report 16 years ago
#341
hi, im 15 years old, and im joinin the raf when i have completed my a levels. I went to an eye appointment today, and i have got beter then 20/20 vision. Just wanted to know if theres any info you could give me?, thex a lot, ben.
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js_atco
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#342
Report 16 years ago
#342
Paul4040:

I made the decision to return to 6th form to resit the final year, as I didn't achieve the results I wanted. I went on to get those results, and am now about to graduate from University with a high 2:1, or possibly a 1st (not counting my chickens though).
As far as I have been told by my local AFCO, resits are not anything to be ashamed of. There are plenty of first-time academic achievers who get back-tracked at IOT, and in their branch training. The fact it's happened to you already may suggest that you accept that you don't always get want you want on the first attempt. Remember: the best drivers aren't necessarily the ones who pass first time - Although that statement excludes me!

Ben_2mk:

In this country the term 6/6. The term 20/20 is used by the Americans. Congratulations on your opto results, but there's far more to worry about than eyes. Make sure your GCSEs are good, and include good Maths and English results. Then make sure, when you go to OASC, your interview techique is practised, you know your RAF knowledge, and your mental arithmetic is excellent.
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Ed1000
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#343
Report 16 years ago
#343
(Original post by Wzz)
If you wouldn't join because they won't pay your petrol costs, then you're not likely to be missed I'm afraid!
Nah i can afford it, i was just wondering
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will 04
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#344
Report 16 years ago
#344
hey, I was wandering if the selection process is as hard to succeed in if you apply for non commissioned aircrew job as it is for a commissioned job?
you can e-mail me at [email protected]. thanks.
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js_atco
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#345
Report 16 years ago
#345
Selection for NC Aircrew and Officers takes place at OASC at Cranwell. You sit the same aptitude tests for NC Aircrew, as you do for Officer.

As far as I am aware, the aptitude required for NC Aircrew branches is lower than for Officer branches. It depends on the branch choice essentially.

AFCO advisers often suggest that Officer applicants put a ground branch and a NC Aircrew branch on their application, as an insurance policy.
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Ste EFC
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#346
Report 16 years ago
#346
If anyone can help me out here, I'm a member of the ATC, I had a problem with asthma when I was around 4-7 years of age, it has completely gone, now I play rugby very often (I represented Merseyside wing this year!), go the gym and run whenever I can. After speaking to a representative of the RAF at my local club, I was told quite obviously becoming a pilot was out of the question. What about other Officer jobs in the RAF? Do I have any chance at all of getting in all because of some problem which I don't have no more?
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Ed1000
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#347
Report 16 years ago
#347
(Original post by Ste EFC)
If anyone can help me out here, I'm a member of the ATC, I had a problem with asthma when I was around 4-7 years of age, it has completely gone, now I play rugby very often (I represented Merseyside wing this year!), go the gym and run whenever I can. After speaking to a representative of the RAF at my local club, I was told quite obviously becoming a pilot was out of the question. What about other Officer jobs in the RAF? Do I have any chance at all of getting in all because of some problem which I don't have no more?
dont tell them
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DRS
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#348
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#348
Why is it that everyone who wants to be a pilot automatically thinks that military is the one and only option?
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Ste EFC
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#349
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#349
But what if they need to look at my medical records or whatever else?
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_pb_boi
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#350
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#350
Why is it that everyone who wants to be a pilot automatically thinks that military is the one and only option?
It's not even that; it's that most people here that are posting about pilots, want to be in the RAF - so, they want to be military pilots. I guess many people who want to be commercial pilots will post on dedicated commercial pilot boards - since there are many more of those than there are military pilot boards, I guess.

Andy
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me99dhj
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#351
Report 16 years ago
#351
(Original post by Ste EFC)
But what if they need to look at my medical records or whatever else?
You are right to question medical records. If you do manage to become aircrew your medical records will be examined in full. Therefore if you saw the doctor at any point about the asthma problem it will show on your records. As to whether the problem having completely subsided/disappeared will affect your chances, unfortunately I'm not clued up enough, but am guessing that someone with a clean history will be first priority. Do enquire further though.
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will1y2
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#352
Report 16 years ago
#352
(Original post by Wzz)
A bit of a generalisation. When looking at things like leadership and teamworking, who's likely to have had more experience; the 17 year old still at home, or the same 17 year old who's since left and spent 3 years at university? Living away from home forces you to grow up and adopt a little bit of maturity; at least a little bit.
wzz
your post fills my position exactly. im 17 still living at home and i feel one of the main reasons im going to uni before joining is because i dont think i would be mature enough to join the RAF until after my a levels. i need at least three years away from home to mature and grow up before i would be able to become an officer (and hopeful fly as pilot)
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will1y2
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#353
Report 16 years ago
#353
(Original post by Wzz)
A bit of a generalisation. When looking at things like leadership and teamworking, who's likely to have had more experience; the 17 year old still at home, or the same 17 year old who's since left and spent 3 years at university? Living away from home forces you to grow up and adopt a little bit of maturity; at least a little bit.
wzz
your post fills my position exactly. im 17 still living at home and i feel one of the main reasons im going to uni before joining is because i dont think i would be mature enough to join the RAF after my a levels. i need at least three years away from home to mature and grow up before i would be able to become an officer (and hopefully pilot)
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DRS
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#354
Report 16 years ago
#354
(Original post by will1y2)
wzz
your post fills my position exactly. im 17 still living at home and i feel one of the main reasons im going to uni before joining is because i dont think i would be mature enough to join the RAF until after my a levels. i need at least three years away from home to mature and grow up before i would be able to become an officer (and hopeful fly as pilot)
Quite true, maybe the experience would be beneficial. However, the actual degree has to be studied for some use that you can apply when you start employment. Even if it is related, can you apply it in real-life?

Example:

I could teach someone to a standard good enough to pass the relevant navigation exam for the PPL, and all the theory behind it, (i.e. the usage of the navigation computer, cross-country procedures, fuel endurance and range calculations etc)
Ok, so we have someone who clearly has a good understanding.

Well as you have the knowledge, that aeroplane you see over in the hanger can you take it up to Rochester and back, make all accurate calculations as you have been taught?

(Not so easy in application is it?)

The fact is that someone with very small theory experience and lots of practical would by far beat the person with massive theory experience.

Another example is in another area of employment, you go into a job area at the age of 23 (after having just left uni with a degree), and are competing with 18 or 17 year olds that hold A-Levels and GCSE's.

The interviewer says: "wow, an english degree, thats good as we could really use someone in our english department! - non of the other people can read, write or spell"

Only if you have a degree that is relevant, will it be of any use - next to no such educational experience.
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Henry234
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#355
Report 16 years ago
#355
Do you know if there are degrees which are favoured? I'm in my second year reading for a Physics degree, and whilst the direct use is limited, I'm sure the skills developed such as critical thinking, problem solving and so on are a major bonus.
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Wzz
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#356
Report 16 years ago
#356
(Original post by DRS)
Why is it that everyone who wants to be a pilot automatically thinks that military is the one and only option?
... because flying down valleys at 420kts pressing to hit a target at a precise time is substantially more rewarding, exciting, and generally better than taking a bunch of lager louts to Ibiza in the dark....
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Wzz
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#357
Report 16 years ago
#357
(Original post by Ed1000)
dont tell them
.... and get kicked out for lacking integrity and honesty.
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will1y2
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#358
Report 16 years ago
#358
im thinking of doing either physics and astronomy or civil/aeronautical/mech engineering. im not sure yet i haent made my mind up but doing it for interest only, and then going into the RAF.
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js_atco
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#359
Report 16 years ago
#359
(Original post by DRS)
Quite true, maybe the experience would be beneficial. However, the actual degree has to be studied for some use that you can apply when you start employment. Even if it is related, can you apply it in real-life?

Example:

I could teach someone to a standard good enough to pass the relevant navigation exam for the PPL, and all the theory behind it, (i.e. the usage of the navigation computer, cross-country procedures, fuel endurance and range calculations etc)
Ok, so we have someone who clearly has a good understanding.

Well as you have the knowledge, that aeroplane you see over in the hanger can you take it up to Rochester and back, make all accurate calculations as you have been taught?

(Not so easy in application is it?)

The fact is that someone with very small theory experience and lots of practical would by far beat the person with massive theory experience.

Another example is in another area of employment, you go into a job area at the age of 23 (after having just left uni with a degree), and are competing with 18 or 17 year olds that hold A-Levels and GCSE's.

The interviewer says: "wow, an english degree, thats good as we could really use someone in our english department! - non of the other people can read, write or spell"

Only if you have a degree that is relevant, will it be of any use - next to no such educational experience.
Everybody is advised to ignore this guy.

Having a degree displays a great deal about both your academic ability, and your level of maturity. The RAF do not specify types of degrees required because they want to attract a wide range of graduate applicants. Many graduate employers also do not require a particular degree discipline, they are more concerned with how you performed, and what transferable skills you have acquired en-route.

Granted, just as many non-graduates are taken into the Service as graduates, but they have absolutely no advantage. In fact, a lot of direct entrants study for degrees whilst in-service.

The RAF doesn't specify A-levels in particular subjects do they? No. This is for exactly the same reason; to attract a wide range of applicants, all who may have useful transferable skills.

Don't feel that it's only worth going to university to study rocket science or astro-physics, if you're set on an RAF career. A degree for most Officer branches isn't needed, but it could help you to persuade the board that you're a suitable person to be looking after the interests of 30 other people.
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Ed1000
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#360
Report 16 years ago
#360
(Original post by Wzz)
.... and get kicked out for lacking integrity and honesty.
lol not necessarily
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