Ed1000
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#361
Report 16 years ago
#361
(Original post by js_atco)
Everybody is advised to ignore this guy.

Having a degree displays a great deal about both your academic ability, and your level of maturity. The RAF do not specify types of degrees required because they want to attract a wide range of graduate applicants. Many graduate employers also do not require a particular degree discipline, they are more concerned with how you performed, and what transferable skills you have acquired en-route.

Granted, just as many non-graduates are taken into the Service as graduates, but they have absolutely no advantage. In fact, a lot of direct entrants study for degrees whilst in-service.

The RAF doesn't specify A-levels in particular subjects do they? No. This is for exactly the same reason; to attract a wide range of applicants, all who may have useful transferable skills.

Don't feel that it's only worth going to university to study rocket science or astro-physics, if you're set on an RAF career. A degree for most Officer branches isn't needed, but it could help you to persuade the board that you're a suitable person to be looking after the interests of 30 other people.
you couldnt be more right, its not what the degree is that will help you, its the fact that youve done it. thats why you can become a pilot without doing a degree, because the application of the skills gained by doing a degree is not so likely to be used, they train you to know/do what is needed - they dont train you to be mature(etc), that is expected.
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icklecathy
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#362
Report 16 years ago
#362
Does any going, or who has been to OASC know what to do with Rail Travel Warrants ? Do you have to use it to get tickets before hand or can you just jump on any train and flash it at the inspector?

If you have to change it for tickets how do you know what return date to book, or what time?

STRESS!!!!
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DRS
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#363
Report 16 years ago
#363
(Original post by Wzz)
... because flying down valleys at 420kts pressing to hit a target at a precise time is substantially more rewarding, exciting, and generally better than taking a bunch of lager louts to Ibiza in the dark....
Right, so you are an airline pilot as well, or you were. How do you know that civilian flying isn't rewarding as well (commercial piloting isn't just limited to airlines you know) you have to work increadably hard to become one.

I actually meant in general, why don't people want to train themselves to be pilots, its the route I took, and it is very rewarding.
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DRS
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#364
Report 16 years ago
#364
(Original post by js_atco)
Everybody is advised to ignore this guy.

Having a degree displays a great deal about both your academic ability, and your level of maturity. The RAF do not specify types of degrees required because they want to attract a wide range of graduate applicants. Many graduate employers also do not require a particular degree discipline, they are more concerned with how you performed, and what transferable skills you have acquired en-route.

Granted, just as many non-graduates are taken into the Service as graduates, but they have absolutely no advantage. In fact, a lot of direct entrants study for degrees whilst in-service.

The RAF doesn't specify A-levels in particular subjects do they? No. This is for exactly the same reason; to attract a wide range of applicants, all who may have useful transferable skills.

Don't feel that it's only worth going to university to study rocket science or astro-physics, if you're set on an RAF career. A degree for most Officer branches isn't needed, but it could help you to persuade the board that you're a suitable person to be looking after the interests of 30 other people.
Quite true, if you had read my post properly you would have understood that I meant as long as there is a real purpose then it is fine. If the RAF want a degree, then go for it. The idea of so many people getting degrees in a range of different and strange subjects just makes no sense when they are going their to stall for three or four years.

The application part, is true unless some vocational experience is given as well. The biggest problem with many new degree graduates is that they get so big headed and confident that they will instantly recieve a ticket into any job they want.

As I have said before, I am interested in why people, when looking to be pilots are so interested in just joining the military. I got my PPL on my own whilst doing the A-Levels, my plan is to go commercial in the civilian world - which I happen to be planning right now. I personally see no benefit or point for me in joining, not really my type of place.
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Wzz
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#365
Report 16 years ago
#365
(Original post by icklecathy)
Does any going, or who has been to OASC know what to do with Rail Travel Warrants ? Do you have to use it to get tickets before hand or can you just jump on any train and flash it at the inspector?

If you have to change it for tickets how do you know what return date to book, or what time?

STRESS!!!!
*sigh*

Take it to the train station; either just before jumping on your train or when you book your tickets. You'll get a couple of tickets given to you; and you can either book journies then or just use them as open tickets. If you happen to be late, the inspector'll swap it for you too.
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Wzz
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#366
Report 16 years ago
#366
(Original post by DRS)
Right, so you are an airline pilot as well, or you were. How do you know that civilian flying isn't rewarding as well (commercial piloting isn't just limited to airlines you know) you have to work increadably hard to become one.

I actually meant in general, why don't people want to train themselves to be pilots, its the route I took, and it is very rewarding.
I don't find any civilian flying enjoyable personally; not teaching, general flying, or anything compared to the military equivalent.

The reason most people don't want to train themselves to be a pilot is because you won't do it as well as the RAF will; I'm substantially better than I ever would have been if I had decided to go through the civilian world.
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Henke
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#367
Report 16 years ago
#367
Wzz - Can you tell me if its worthwhile applying to be a WS Officer even though me eyesight isn't perfect? Its within the official limit for WSO's but the AFCO said that they probably would knock me back and take on a guy with 6/6 vision.

If anyone wants to know the eyesight requirements for any RAF post check out this site

www.assoc-optometrists.org/services/visual/visual_1010163352.html
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js_atco
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#368
Report 16 years ago
#368
(Original post by DRS)
Quite true, if you had read my post properly you would have understood that I meant as long as there is a real purpose then it is fine. If the RAF want a degree, then go for it. The idea of so many people getting degrees in a range of different and strange subjects just makes no sense when they are going their to stall for three or four years.

The application part, is true unless some vocational experience is given as well. The biggest problem with many new degree graduates is that they get so big headed and confident that they will instantly recieve a ticket into any job they want.

As I have said before, I am interested in why people, when looking to be pilots are so interested in just joining the military. I got my PPL on my own whilst doing the A-Levels, my plan is to go commercial in the civilian world - which I happen to be planning right now. I personally see no benefit or point for me in joining, not really my type of place.
You're still not getting the point.

Take me as an example. I considered joining the RAF after my A-Levels, but came to the conclusion that: (a) I didn't believe I had the maturity that was going to be required of an Officer; and (b) I felt it was extremely important to get myself an insurance policy if I was unsuccessful in my RAF appilcation.

From walking into the AFCO, right through to starting IOT, can take as long as 12 months. I think it is unwise, and unrealistic, to put your life on hold, whilst you wait for the RAF to decide whether they want you or not. The RAF don't expect you to do this either. By making the decision to go to university, I have matured a great deal, and gained a vast amount of leadership and team working experience.

Now approaching my graduation, I am already well advanced in my RAF application. As soon as I have finished my finals, and returned from a brief holiday, I will be going to OASC. If I am successful, I will hopefully start IOT in November or February. If I am not successful, I have a degree in a technology field which should not cause me too many problems in finding employment.

I don't expect my degree alone to get me a job though. Whilst at university, I have spent time as president of a society; newspaper sub-editor; radio station scheduling manager; sat on Union Council; and I've also had a part-time job. I also have over 3 years worth of practical experience in the field I would be seeking employment.

Now if you still think a degree is useless, unless the RAF specifically request it, you really should persue a civilian aviation career. Offering the bare minimum has never got anyone a job.
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Greybadger
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#369
Report 16 years ago
#369
I think one of the main points that comes through from your post is the fact that through university life you can persure many extra curricular activites that you wouldn't have without.

I'm in my second year reading Physics, which is a great fallback, but I've also been training sec for our mountaineering club, treasurer for the subject society, I'm involved with national and local committees through the British Mountaineering Council, play loads of music and find time to fit in being a technical director of a theatre company back home.

It's these kind of things, and the things you have done, for example, that really make someone stand out from the rest.
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js_atco
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#370
Report 16 years ago
#370
Exactly! They'll want to hear about stuff like this at filter interviews and OASC. If you don't have any replies to questions like: "What extra-curricular activities did you pursue at school / 6th form / uni?"
They'll write you off as someone who doesn't have any potential to offer anything to the Service. "I went to 6th form and got 3 As" simply wont do!
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Greybadger
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#371
Report 16 years ago
#371
Of course the same can be said for any job really, the more quality stuff you've got the better. Also, it's very easy to sniff out people who have started doing something for the sole purpose of expanding a CV, it's not big and clever kids!
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zug
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#372
Report 16 years ago
#372
what are good ways to practise multitasking? i cant really think of any
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js_atco
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#373
Report 16 years ago
#373
Try watching TV or playing computer games, then get someone to walk into the room and ask you mental arithmetic questions every 5 minutes.
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Greybadger
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#374
Report 16 years ago
#374
I find playing a bit of Beethoven on the piano and holding a reasonable conversation at the same time a bit of a toughie :-)

Seriously though, do you think you can learn to multitask? Surely it's a thing you've either got the capacity to do inherently or not at all?
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DRS
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#375
Report 16 years ago
#375
(Original post by js_atco)
You're still not getting the point.

Take me as an example. I considered joining the RAF after my A-Levels, but came to the conclusion that: (a) I didn't believe I had the maturity that was going to be required of an Officer; and (b) I felt it was extremely important to get myself an insurance policy if I was unsuccessful in my RAF appilcation.

From walking into the AFCO, right through to starting IOT, can take as long as 12 months. I think it is unwise, and unrealistic, to put your life on hold, whilst you wait for the RAF to decide whether they want you or not. The RAF don't expect you to do this either. By making the decision to go to university, I have matured a great deal, and gained a vast amount of leadership and team working experience.

Now approaching my graduation, I am already well advanced in my RAF application. As soon as I have finished my finals, and returned from a brief holiday, I will be going to OASC. If I am successful, I will hopefully start IOT in November or February. If I am not successful, I have a degree in a technology field which should not cause me too many problems in finding employment.

I don't expect my degree alone to get me a job though. Whilst at university, I have spent time as president of a society; newspaper sub-editor; radio station scheduling manager; sat on Union Council; and I've also had a part-time job. I also have over 3 years worth of practical experience in the field I would be seeking employment.

Now if you still think a degree is useless, unless the RAF specifically request it, you really should persue a civilian aviation career. Offering the bare minimum has never got anyone a job.
Where did you get the idea I thought a degree is useless?

Let me sum it up:

SPECIFIC USE, GOALS, INTEREST AND OBJECTIVES IN MIND = GOOD
NO PARTICULAR REASON, STALLING, WASTING TIME = BAD

I hold a Private Pilot Licence so I guess I am fully set in the civilian world where I am looking into going commercial and hopefully becoming a flying instructor.
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js_atco
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#376
Report 16 years ago
#376
Realistically no-one is going to do a degree, then go to the RAF and tell them that they did it to waste time, even if that is the real reason! I think this is more to do with attitude and interview technique, than it is to do with degrees in general.
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zug
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#377
Report 16 years ago
#377
(Original post by Greybadger)
I find playing a bit of Beethoven on the piano and holding a reasonable conversation at the same time a bit of a toughie :-)

Seriously though, do you think you can learn to multitask? Surely it's a thing you've either got the capacity to do inherently or not at all?
ok i agree its just iv only really seriously thought about what it will really take to join so i have no idea how capab le i am at multitasking. i wish to praxctise as yes i do believe this will help in the long run, so any suggestions?
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will1y2
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#378
Report 16 years ago
#378
While going for a run i give myself random numbers to add, subtract, multiply or divide.
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icklecathy
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#379
Report 16 years ago
#379
(Original post by will1y2)
While going for a run i give myself random numbers to add, subtract, multiply or divide.
Good idea! Although I hate going running enough already!

I work in a shop and when I give customers change from the till I always work it out in my head before I look at what it says on the till, sad but true, but it helps my mental arithmetic.
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Greybadger
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#380
Report 16 years ago
#380
If people are worried about mental arithmetic stuff, next time you're in a car and pass a road sign work out how long it'll take you to get to each destination on the sign at your current speed.
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