Drewski
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#4741
(Original post by Mr_Anonymous_)
Hello,
I may be about to sound incredibly conceited and I hope I don't elicit too much of an angry response here. Essentially I am currently 17 and have as of today just finished my A-Levels in Psychology, Sociology and Classical Civilisations in which I am expecting 2-3 C's or maybe one or two of those will be a B. Additionally I have 9 GCSE's with 6 B's and 3 C's and therefore as I'm sure many here are aware, allows me to meet the entry requirements for the RAF as a pilot which has always been a goal of mine as far back as I can remember.

However the conceited part starts here as I, up until a few months ago have always been overconfident in the fact that I was going to be able to gain entry into the RAF using just my academic grades as long as I met the entry requirements. Thus I have partaken in little outside activities of noteworthy value. Therefore I was wondering if I could ask for the opinion of anyone here as to what you think my chances are of getting through the interview stage. As I stated I'm confident I can meet the academic requirements and my fitness is no issue though I now realise the importance of these extra activities I always shunned as unnecessary.

So does anyone think I stand a chance at being able to present the qualities listed above in such a manner as to achieve my goal of becoming a pilot without having taken part in such activities or would it be best for me to take a year out and spend time completing these tasks and sports before enlisting later this year as I planned previously.

Any advice and opinions are appreciated,
Mr_Anonymous_
You've made it unnecessarily difficult for yourself.

Yes, your academics meet the basic requirements, but they don't do so by a long way. Pilot is amongst the most competitive branches going, just having the minimum requirements is usually not going to be enough.

If you've got no evidence of your leadership potential to demonstrate to the RAF that you could be an officer, then they're not going to be that keen on spending vast sums of taxpayer money when you've only got mediocre exam results.

Suddenly starting some clubs now is better than nothing, but there's a distinct chance that you won't be able to progress enough in a year to actually use them for any examples of potential.

The arrogance you allude to might have shot yourself in the foot. It's not impossible, you do have the basic requirements so you'll have a chance. I've seen people get in when they have, on paper, a lacking application, but that's usually because they've excelled in one area. If you can get the rarer-than-hen's-teeth full marks on the aptitude tests, then you might get in, for instance.

By all means try, but don't hold your breath.
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Mr_Anonymous_
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#4742
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#4742
(Original post by Drewski)
You've made it unnecessarily difficult for yourself.

Yes, your academics meet the basic requirements, but they don't do so by a long way. Pilot is amongst the most competitive branches going, just having the minimum requirements is usually not going to be enough.

If you've got no evidence of your leadership potential to demonstrate to the RAF that you could be an officer, then they're not going to be that keen on spending vast sums of taxpayer money when you've only got mediocre exam results.

Suddenly starting some clubs now is better than nothing, but there's a distinct chance that you won't be able to progress enough in a year to actually use them for any examples of potential.

The arrogance you allude to might have shot yourself in the foot. It's not impossible, you do have the basic requirements so you'll have a chance. I've seen people get in when they have, on paper, a lacking application, but that's usually because they've excelled in one area. If you can get the rarer-than-hen's-teeth full marks on the aptitude tests, then you might get in, for instance.

By all means try, but don't hold your breath.
I appreciate your candour and completely agree with everything you have said. I am aware that I have a number of references from teachers through my college years that express my capability in leadership and academics although I know my current grades are nothing to be overly impressed with. I certainly will take your advice and apply possibly using these references and doing my best to make a good impression throughout the interview as I have no intention of simply giving up at this first hurdle. Hopefully I can excel in the other aspects such as current events, motivation and knowledge of the RAF as I have visited active airbases before such as Brize Norton and attended the RIAT multiple years in a row (If that means anything).

Thank you for the advice
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Drewski
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#4743
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#4743
(Original post by Mr_Anonymous_)
I appreciate your candour and completely agree with everything you have said. I am aware that I have a number of references from teachers through my college years that express my capability in leadership and academics although I know my current grades are nothing to be overly impressed with. I certainly will take your advice and apply possibly using these references and doing my best to make a good impression throughout the interview as I have no intention of simply giving up at this first hurdle. Hopefully I can excel in the other aspects such as current events, motivation and knowledge of the RAF as I have visited active airbases before such as Brize Norton and attended the RIAT multiple years in a row (If that means anything).

Thank you for the advice
The references, while not bad, won't help you much when the questions you'll be asked will be along the lines "what clubs or teams did you join during school? What positions of leadership did you have in them?" and "What clubs or teams did you join outside of school? What positions of leadership did you have in them?".

If you have no clubs to talk about, then you won't be able to demonstrate that you've had the positions to learn from. Service knowledge, while nice to have, isn't anything like as important.

While 18 year olds do get in for pilot, it's usually because they've got something exceptional behind them, whether that's extra curricular (usually air cadets), are a phenomenon at sports, score full marks on the aptitude tests, or do exceptionally in the hangar exercises. And they are the minority*.

If I were you, I'd think instead about getting into to university and then taking an active part in clubs and societies to prove yourself as someone worthy of being selected. But then, your grades might be a problem.



*Let's say they're recruiting 10 people for pilot, of that 10, 1 might be someone already in the RAF looking for something else, 7/8 will be people just out of university, leaving 1 or 2 slots for people aged 18-20. By all means go for it, but remember you're in the minority.
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Mr_Anonymous_
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#4744
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(Original post by Drewski)
The references, while not bad, won't help you much when the questions you'll be asked will be along the lines "what clubs or teams did you join during school? What positions of leadership did you have in them?" and "What clubs or teams did you join outside of school? What positions of leadership did you have in them?".

If you have no clubs to talk about, then you won't be able to demonstrate that you've had the positions to learn from. Service knowledge, while nice to have, isn't anything like as important.

While 18 year olds do get in for pilot, it's usually because they've got something exceptional behind them, whether that's extra curricular (usually air cadets), are a phenomenon at sports, score full marks on the aptitude tests, or do exceptionally in the hangar exercises. And they are the minority*.

If I were you, I'd think instead about getting into to university and then taking an active part in clubs and societies to prove yourself as someone worthy of being selected. But then, your grades might be a problem.



*Let's say they're recruiting 10 people for pilot, of that 10, 1 might be someone already in the RAF looking for something else, 7/8 will be people just out of university, leaving 1 or 2 slots for people aged 18-20. By all means go for it, but remember you're in the minority.
I see, well thank you for the information it really is quite helpful and as far as I'm aware there is no harm in me enlisting and attempting to get through the process. However I have heard that you only get three attempts to enlist after which you will no longer be able to apply for the role. Do you know if this is this true? And as for the aptitude tests this may be a good chance for me as using the online test I believe I achieved about 85% however this was a while ago so I'm not entirely sure although I'm not aware of the 'hanger exercises' you mentioned. Would you be able to clarify what these are to me?
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Drewski
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(Original post by Mr_Anonymous_)
I see, well thank you for the information it really is quite helpful and as far as I'm aware there is no harm in me enlisting and attempting to get through the process. However I have heard that you only get three attempts to enlist after which you will no longer be able to apply for the role. Do you know if this is this true? And as for the aptitude tests this may be a good chance for me as using the online test I believe I achieved about 85% however this was a while ago so I'm not entirely sure although I'm not aware of the 'hanger exercises' you mentioned. Would you be able to clarify what these are to me?
I've not heard of 3 strikes and you're out.

The online version is, I think, only the AST, not the CBAT, which is quite a step up and a lot harder.

Hangar exercises are part of the two phase OASC tests, you and other candidates will be put into a team of 6 and will attempt various challenges, of which 1 you will be the leader.
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Mr_Anonymous_
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#4746
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(Original post by Drewski)
I've not heard of 3 strikes and you're out.

The online version is, I think, only the AST, not the CBAT, which is quite a step up and a lot harder.

Hangar exercises are part of the two phase OASC tests, you and other candidates will be put into a team of 6 and will attempt various challenges, of which 1 you will be the leader.
Ah, thanks for the clarification there I do remember now I did read about those leadership exercises and make a not of them in a folder I created with the information necessary to be memorised however I have few notes on this. Now that you have emphasised their importance I will make sure to put further research into them.

Again thank you for all the information its been very enlightening and may I ask how you know all this, are you currently in service or?
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Holdie-01
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#4747
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(Original post by Mr_Anonymous_)
Ah, thanks for the clarification there I do remember now I did read about those leadership exercises and make a not of them in a folder I created with the information necessary to be memorised however I have few notes on this. Now that you have emphasised their importance I will make sure to put further research into them.

Again thank you for all the information its been very enlightening and may I ask how you know all this, are you currently in service or?
Mr Anonymous! How did you get on?!
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threeportdrift
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(Original post by Holdie-01)
Mr Anonymous! How did you get on?!
He only ever made those 4 posts on TSR, but I'd be happy to put money on the fact he got nowhere. He was hopelessly under-prepared and unless he had exceptional raw talent at both the flying and the leadership skills, he would have been uncompetitive at OASC.
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Holdie-01
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#4749
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#4749
(Original post by threeportdrift)
He only ever made those 4 posts on TSR, but I'd be happy to put money on the fact he got nowhere. He was hopelessly under-prepared and unless he had exceptional raw talent at both the flying and the leadership skills, he would have been uncompetitive at OASC.
That’s a very judgemental view point you have there
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Drewski
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(Original post by Holdie-01)
That’s a very judgemental view point you have there
It's safe to say that 3pd is talking from a very experienced and knowledgeable position, so while possibly coming across as judgemental to untrained eyes, they're more than likely highly accurate.
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Holdie-01
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#4751
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#4751
Are you guys RAF pilots or something?
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threeportdrift
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#4752
(Original post by Holdie-01)
Are you guys RAF pilots or something?
ex, yes
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Holdie-01
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(Original post by threeportdrift)
ex, yes
That’s cool, I always wanted to do that job.
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Holdie-01
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Always thought you’d ere on the side of inclusivity and mentoring being ex raf officers, rather than just making unhelpful comments
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NFI
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(Original post by Holdie-01)
Always thought you’d ere on the side of inclusivity and mentoring being ex raf officers, rather than just making unhelpful comments
The military is one of the most exclusive employers in the UK. Being blunt with people is part of everyday routine so if you want to be feathered throughout then the military is perhaps not the lifestyle choice for the sensitive types.
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Drewski
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(Original post by Holdie-01)
Always thought you’d ere on the side of inclusivity and mentoring being ex raf officers, rather than just making unhelpful comments
Define unhelpful.

Pointing out that a previous poster was ill-prepared and ill-suited is not unhelpful.

At the time of their posting, you'll see they were offered advice on how to assist their application. Whether they take advice has nothing to do with us.

What we try to do is present an accurate and realistic impression of the lifestyle, especially the lifestyle during initial training. There, a candidate won't be spoon fed, they won't be handed the answers. They'll be advised where to find the answers and then trusted to do the work themselves. The sooner that habit starts, the better.
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Andy1973
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#4757
Ex-RAF pilot or not, I do not think that you can realistically state that an individual has no chance at OASC based on four posts in an online forum.

By the way, what did you fly in the RAF 3PD?
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threeportdrift
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#4758
(Original post by Andy1973)
Ex-RAF pilot or not, I do not think that you can realistically state that an individual has no chance at OASC based on four posts in an online forum.

By the way, what did you fly in the RAF 3PD?
Hercs
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1J2
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Hi, I have just been reading this and it seems as though there are some pretty experienced people in here and i was hoping to ask for some advice about any extra things I should be doing and what my chances are of getting into the RAF as a pilot.I am currently at Newcastle university studying mathematics with finance, A-levels: three A's in Mathematics, Physics and Chemistry, my GCSEs are 2 A stars 4 As, 3Bs and 1 C (in English language), in terms of extra curricular activities: at university i started playing mens lacrosse and am currently second team captain, At school i played rugby at fullback, I have done the same for a club, And was on the first team for swimming and got half colours, outisde of school and university oi have competed in tetrathlons (shooting(pistol),swimming,runni ng and horse riding) and captained the northern England junior team at 16. Any advice would be very helpful, Thankyou!
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Surnia
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#4760
(Original post by 1J2)
Hi, I have just been reading this and it seems as though there are some pretty experienced people in here and i was hoping to ask for some advice about any extra things I should be doing and what my chances are of getting into the RAF as a pilot.I am currently at Newcastle university studying mathematics with finance, A-levels: three A's in Mathematics, Physics and Chemistry, my GCSEs are 2 A stars 4 As, 3Bs and 1 C (in English language), in terms of extra curricular activities: at university i started playing mens lacrosse and am currently second team captain, At school i played rugby at fullback, I have done the same for a club, And was on the first team for swimming and got half colours, outisde of school and university oi have competed in tetrathlons (shooting(pistol),swimming,runni ng and horse riding) and captained the northern England junior team at 16. Any advice would be very helpful, Thankyou!
As you'll be applying to be an officer you need to be showing your leadership potential, much more so than taking part in sports, and that is done by taking on positions with responsibility. Within sport, it's not something you have to play, it can be a committee position - treasurer, fixtures manager, organise a charity match? And look outside of sports: volunteering, mentoring, help with uniformed organisations, eg cadets or scouts, part-time job in the holidays?

The sooner you start doing this, the better; it doesn't look good when people have taken on extra activities a few weeks before they apply to the RAF. Just keep the right balance between studies and any extra-curricular stuff; a good degree may be something you need to fall back on if the RAF application doesn't work out. Good luck!
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