vikki
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#501
Report 15 years ago
#501
i think they're looking for 'well-rounded' people. i try and do a variety of acitivities - actually becuase i enjoy them, if they're the kind of thing the raf wants too then bonus. try doing things that draw on different skills - teamwork, leadership etc. at the end of the day though, you pass oasc if you do well enough over all 4 days not just how many extra activities you do!!
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Suzi Q
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#502
Report 15 years ago
#502
I think it's just to see if you would be suited to a varied and energetic lifestyle. They obviously want you to be interested in a range of activites. I got through my interviews at OASC by saying my outside interests are ATC (which includes camps, shooting, sports, flying, community service), playing tennis, hockey and swimming, supporting QPR FC, helping at my local primary school, working as an assistant watersports instructor... they like to see that you can use different skills aswell as just (for example) being sporty. Situations where you help out the community or lead/work with groups of people are also good. Just make sure you have a few different interests.
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Wzz
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#503
Report 15 years ago
#503
(Original post by me99dhj)
I recently went to my AFCO and was thinking of reapplying in the near future as a WSO (nav). I was told that numbers were dropping in not only the pilot branch but also the WSO (Nav) and Engineer branches, to 100, 20 and 75 respectively!
I was quoted those figures for next year by a careers liason officer who had just recieved those figures within the last few weeks. Who is right?
The WSO branch is due a drop, so that might well have done already. The rotary force is going to 2 pilot ops so doesn't need navs anymore.

We still need engineers, and we're undersubscribed, so any drop in their branch would surprise me. But, I no longer work in recruiting.
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Wzz
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#504
Report 15 years ago
#504
(Original post by quesoyyo)
I also dreamt of becoming a pilot when I was a little kid, a fighter one. But as I grew up i dropped all my hopes since I wear glasses and am 2 meters tall...but anyways, is there still some hope? If not a fighter pilot, then a passenger one?
Glasses rules you out of our air force I'm afraid.

(Original post by quesoyyo)
But now I grew up and I reconsidered the fighter one. I thought it was too dangerous, but what is the probaility of losing your life as fighter pilot? 1/1000?
Well, what're the chances of losing your life crossing the road? Walking to the shops? Driving 100 miles? It's all a bit subjective. It's dangerous, but generally you have to be a bit arrogant to get there, and you don't believe you're going to die. You generally think you're too good.

(Original post by quesoyyo)
Even if you went to war, it would be damn hard to shoot you down.
Since you are a European pilot and fly one of the most modern airplanes, you'd have to fight against another industrialised country as Italy, France, Germany or the USA, a war which will never occurr, to get shot down. So a fighter pilot is a quite safe job, isn't it?
It's training that kills you, not warfighting, to be honest.
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Wzz
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#505
Report 15 years ago
#505
(Original post by Verbal)
Oh dear, does this mean you wouldn't recommend joining the RAF. Having got over my reservations about joining i am in the process of applying now. Does the above comment mean i have made the wrong choice, aaaaah dont want to go through convincing myself its the right thing to do again!!!!
Well, it's very personal. It's a hard life on the front line right now, and it's likely to get harder. Between courses, you're likely to find yourself running fire stations if the bloody firemen strike again. If you're a rotary mate, be prepared to be overstretched, overdeployed, overworked, and possibly divorced. In the multi-engine world, you're away a lot, and a lot of kit doesn't work. F3 frontline squadrons have no spares and guys are getting very few hours.

However, if you don't join, you'll never ever get the opportunity to wax a Hawk down the A5 pass at 420kts. Weigh it up?
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Wzz
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#506
Report 15 years ago
#506
(Original post by Wing Commander)
thanks for your help subline envy, my level of fitness is quite high as i go to the gym regulary and go swimming etc..i also do sports ie football, basketball. if there is anymore information you can give me i would be very greatful
Well, remember they're keen on people with initiative; don't ask us what to do, think about it yourself. The advice on here's pretty good, but you'll look daft taking something up because you think it'll appeal to the interviewers.
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huggybear
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#507
Report 15 years ago
#507
Hi,

Is anyone going to the SERE course on 5 August? WZZ, can you tell me where they do Op Peacekeeper? I know the FLC week is in Otterburn or Sennybridge. Just curious. Can't wait to go - am so excited.
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Wzz
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#508
Report 15 years ago
#508
(Original post by huggybear)
Hi,

Is anyone going to the SERE course on 5 August? WZZ, can you tell me where they do Op Peacekeeper? I know the FLC week is in Otterburn or Sennybridge. Just curious. Can't wait to go - am so excited.
I certainly can. It begins at an austere site at Fulbeck, where you start learning how to run the jobs, roles and things you'll be doing. Then you move for the last few days to RAF Barkston Heath where you've got a proper COC to work from and a few more facilities for when "enemy" attention ramps up. Barkston's just south west of Cranwell by a few miles, and is where the Army and RN do EFT. Fulbeck's somewhere in Lincolnshire.
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flashman
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#509
Report 15 years ago
#509
[QUOTE=me99dhj]
(Original post by Wzz)
No, just pilots.

I recently went to my AFCO and was thinking of reapplying in the near future as a WSO (nav). I was told that numbers were dropping in not only the pilot branch but also the WSO (Nav) and Engineer branches, to 100, 20 and 75 respectively!
I was quoted those figures for next year by a careers liason officer who had just recieved those figures within the last few weeks. Who is right?

I don't know if iv'e misunderstood this, do you mean the annual intake of pilots is 100, WSOs is 20 and engineer branches are 75?
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flashman
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#510
Report 15 years ago
#510
(Original post by Wzz)
Low.

For the past as-long-as-I-can-remember the ITT's been 185; it's just been chopped to 100 for this financial year onwards.

Effectively it's now that much harder to get a pilot slot; nearly 100%.
How many people would you say apply for pilot slots every year approximately?
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Wzz
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#511
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#511
(Original post by flashman)
How many people would you say apply for pilot slots every year approximately?
Nowadays, probably still well over 1000. A board a month with a maximum of 40 people on it, sometimes maybe 20 are aircrew candidates.
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BlackHawk
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#512
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#512
I never really understood the appeal of joining as a pilot. Seems as though that is what everyone wants to do, although I do tend to get weird looks at my AFCO for wanting to be a fighter controller. Wzz, know if they are still actively recruiting in that field?
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me99dhj
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#513
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#513
(Original post by flashman)
I don't know if iv'e misunderstood this, do you mean the annual intake of pilots is 100, WSOs is 20 and engineer branches are 75?
No you haven't misunderstood the figures! Its not very many is it! As I said earlier in the thread, I was quoted these about 3 weeks ago in my OASC debrief by a currently serving careers liason officer. I was told that the figures are a combination of the predicted amount amount of people leaving the force next year (in those branches) and the general 'streamlining' trend of the force as a whole. He said that they could well change, but not very significantly.
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flashman
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#514
Report 15 years ago
#514
(Original post by Wzz)
Nowadays, probably still well over 1000. A board a month with a maximum of 40 people on it, sometimes maybe 20 are aircrew candidates.
What percentage of those do you think have actually prepared themselves enough to have any decent chance of being successful? i.e do a lot of people turn up thinking they will be able to get in having not done any real research or anything? Also, how many turn up expecting to get in with medical poblems i.e height, hayfever, asthma or the like?
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Wzz
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#515
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#515
(Original post by sublime_envy)
I never really understood the appeal of joining as a pilot. Seems as though that is what everyone wants to do, although I do tend to get weird looks at my AFCO for wanting to be a fighter controller. Wzz, know if they are still actively recruiting in that field?
Yes, very actively, they're quite desperate for scopies.

Everyone wants to be a pilot because it's a superb job; flying's a lot of fun even when you've been doing it for years.

Should I ever meet you in a mess bar, I don't want to hear any moans about aircrew, flying pay, or anything like that seeing as I now know you never wanted to be a pilot
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_pb_boi
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#516
Report 15 years ago
#516

I'm a bit worried about my extra-curricular activities atm!

I play football, run and go to the gym. I also play hockey for the school. That would be about the limit of my outdoor activities, though. Indoors, I play table tennis. I also have an interest in computing that goes beyond regular use I guess, in that I program and have a very real interest in the subject; a career in IT will be my fallback should I fail RAF.
I have a part-time job that I've held for around 6 months so far, too. In addition, I'm part of a gaming club at the local university, though I'm L6 year in school but it's open to all.

None of these were taken up because I thought they'd be of use to me for RAF selection; but now that I'll be handing in my AS level grades for sponsorship in just a few months, it has crossed my mind.

Is there anything else you'd recommend? I've long thought about community work for my own edification - with the initial interview and hopefully selection approaching, I'm hoping it would act as evidence of my character and suitability for the RAF. I'm not honestly sure as to how to go about entering this field, however.

Edit: Some more questions.

I presume it's too late to arrange work experience now; is it at all possible to book an appointment with the AFCO, so that I can talk to serving RAF personnel for research? I understand that it makes sense to research as much as possible; while the internet is useful for this, talking to serving RAF personnel would really be helpful. What kind of questions would they deem appropriate? Generally, I think I'd be asking about the different streams, about living within the RAF, etc. If it's possible - will they begrudge spending the time with me? I don't think they would, because they were cool on the phone with me, but I just want to make sure

Huggybear posted some very useful information about the RAF interview; huggybear - and anyone else - how did you best research the RAF aircraft, stations, etc.? Again, the internet is useful here, but I find there is only so much I can find on it. Regarding the current affairs component - I think I'm pretty good with this, but I know there's more I can learn; I think broadsheet newspapers are the way to go with this?

Sorry for the post length!

Thanks peeps,

andy.
Any ideas..?

To top it all off, now mum is getting at me because I didn't go to cadets... not that she ever actually believes I'll get in anyways!

andy.
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huggybear
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#517
Report 15 years ago
#517
Hi Andy,

E mail me at [email protected] if you wanna chat more about this. I saw a Ft Lt at AFCO Bristol. He was very helpful and gave me some hints and tips for the 3 days of tests. They are there to help you and are only too pleased to do so. They'll even give you a practice interview if you like which is recommended. He showed me the questions I'd be asked and sure enough they all were!

I wasn't expecting quite so many q's on my outside activities. I was asked about any voluntary work I'd done and am doing, any sports and teams I am in.

I said I helped with riding for disabled at school, ran a 1/2 marathon for charity, and am planning a parachute jump. Also said I was in all netball teams etc at school and that I run 3 times a week with British Military Fitness which is all true but you have to concentrate on activities that you do with people your own age. What they do NOT want are people who sit at computers all day, fiddle with classic cars on their own or do activities on their own. You have to show that you can mix with all sorts of people, are sociable, happy, chatty and confident. Just imagine you are the best person for the job and go in knowing that. Don't worry at all about foreign affairs. It lasts about `10 mins max. I was asked about ID cards and Zimbabwe. What they do is get you to give them some headlines and then they'll come back to the ones they fancy talking about. They won't make you squirm though if you don't know something - they'll be so friendly (well my boarding officers were anyway). I'm 31 and they took me back to my school days and asked me what I did from age 11 onwards - know your own history and dates off by heart - ie when you went to 2ndary school, uni, what you did, what you enjoyed, biggest achievement, disappointment.

If you need any more info, let me know. Good luck!
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LouBou75
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#518
Report 15 years ago
#518
Well I have just recieved my letter from Cranwell and I am disappointed to tell you that I did not get through. I did well as far as I am concerned and certainly a lot of positives came from the report that I have been debriefed with. So if where I went wrong can help anyone else, let me know.

Basically I did really well in the interview but I struggled in the syndicate scenario. Its well worth concentrating on preparing for these parts of the interview and not wasting too much time and effort on current affairs (especially if you are pretty well clued up on current affairs already). The scenario requires dealing with a massive amount of information in 15 minutes before you come together as a group and formulate a solution as a group. You really need to practice maths questions and get used to coping with situations like that under timed conditions. Its 10 years since my GCSE and I was certainly not used to it.
The other weak area for me was the command situation. Something I was expected to excel on. However, having never done one before it was a very new thing for me and depsite being in control of my team and being encouraging I struggled to find a viable solution and the pressure was telling on my face. You really need to be confident and convincing in this. If there is anyway to practice this do. I can only suggest practice with friends and search the internet for examples.

Happy to go through things in more detail if anyone requires or ask for my email and I can discuss it on a more personal level.

Good luck everyone, if a career in the RAF is what you want and OASC is looming before you PREPARATION is the key!

Lou
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_pb_boi
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#519
Report 15 years ago
#519
Thanks very much for the information, huggybear - really appreciate that, it was very useful Makes me a bit more sure of my own suitability, I think - just need some more activities; as you say, they focus on it a lot, then!

Loubou, sorry to hear about you not getting OASC - but, if you found the debrief useful, then you got something from it - are you trying again next year? You'll do it as long as you want to

How maths based was it?
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Wing Commander
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#520
Report 15 years ago
#520
i think it is basic maths of speed, distance and time. myself is currently studying physics which has a lot math base scenarios at normal and complex levels so i hope that it will be an advantage for me. i was once told that you can practice some types by getting a map and finding a distance between two places. think of a speed and calculate the time and vice versa. do not use a calculator though as it is mental arithmatic. theres is more but i cant remember at the top of my head sorry. any info you have on anything about the preparing for selection process will great.
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