Nikki J S
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#1741
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#1741
(Original post by Arch-Angel)
If the only real concern for the time promotion is salary based then you'll be on £40,000+ within 8 years. HTH

Not as bothered about the salary as I am about the promotions. Don't want to be left behind
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Wzz
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#1742
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#1742
(Original post by Nikki J S)
Just don't want to be disadvantaged promotion wise by doing an extra couple of years at uni;I'm very ambitious
No-one gets "left behind!" It doesn't work like that anyway; the medical branch is its own little empire. You'll never be a station commander, regardless of whether you wind up as a Group Captain; you're not in the same "basket" as officer on the general list. You're not in competition with me for promotion, for example; just other doctors.

Besides, you realise most people in the RAF are Flight Lieutenants, right?
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maverick_87
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#1743
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#1743
(Original post by Nikki J S)
Jamie, found this for you:


Vocational A levels or Vocational Certificates of Education (VCEs)

Vocational A levels have replaced Advanced GNVQ courses. They allow students to develop skills, up-to-date knowledge and understanding of the underpinning principles and processes in the vocational area they are studying and prepare them for both the world of work and progression to Higher Education. Learning should be active and student-led, although directed by teachers and supported by professional and employer input. Assessment is done both internally and externally. Vocational A-levels can be taken by themselves or in combination with traditional A levels. Students choose between:

Vocational Certificate of Education (VCE) Advanced Subsidiary (3 units) - equivalent to an AS level

Vocational Certificate of Education (VCE) Advanced Level (6 units) - equivalent to an A level

Vocational Certificate of Education (VCE) Double Award (12 units) - equivalent to 2 A levels


Hope this helps
Yeah thanks, much appreciated, looks like I might have to take a maths one of these next year, so good to finally see summin on them; most of my teachers dont know anything about them....

Thanks again

Oh and from the person rejected for aircrew for the upper tract respiratory....thingy. Was it related to that weezing condition of the upper respirotary tract mentioned on here quite a while before? Because thats what I (think) I had years ago and was told it was not a problem, albeit it was on this site not by a doctor. (Altough this person did have a letter from his GP stating it was ok for the RAF and not related to asthma ect, not sure if it was someoe who still posts on here!)

But I have for a while now been looking at other ground postions in case I am told I cannot be accpeted for aircrew, altough I try not to think about it.....
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BlackHawk
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#1744
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#1744
(Original post by Scorg)
Thats not very nice is it :eek:
exactly! its only a back up plan after all. But still an appealing one. I don't *think* he's serious. But then you never know with marines.
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BlackHawk
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#1745
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#1745
(Original post by REME-Bod)
To be honest, having worked with the Artillery, I've yet to meet a better bunch of lads. (Apart from the cavalry).
Thats good to know. I think my info from navy-boy over here is just slightly bias!
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Locost Builder
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#1746
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#1746
(Original post by Wzz)
According to PSF here, there's no longer any such thing as "home to duty." Again the concept being that if you want, you could have bought closer/lived in FQs or whatever, so by choosing to live further away it's your problem.
Wzz, are you sure? I think it's now called RILOR. Recompense in leui of Relocation. As far as I know it applies up to 50 miles, one way and you pay the first 7. It certainly applies to me. I qualified buy buying a house and moving off base in the first 6 months. I even got an extension because the house sale was 'in progress' but unlikely to be completed before the 6 month point. It actually equates to about £30 a month which doesnt't even cover petrol costs in my gas-gussler but it's better than nothing and goes in my pay every month - no forms to fill in - you'll know what I mean, they don't make claims easy!
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steve_nels
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#1747
[QUOTE=
Oh and from the person rejected for aircrew for the upper tract respiratory....thingy. Was it related to that weezing condition of the upper respirotary tract mentioned on here quite a while before? Because thats what I (think) I had years ago and was told it was not a problem, albeit it was on this site not by a doctor. (Altough this person did have a letter from his GP stating it was ok for the RAF and not related to asthma ect, not sure if it was someoe who still posts on here!)

[/QUOTE]

Yeah that was me Its a long story but for some reason i had it in my mind years ago that i suffered from asthma, so therefore i knew that aircrew was totally out of the question for me. With a glimmer of a chance that it may not of been asthma i wrote a letter to my GP to get that reply which i posted earlier.

Because i had not viewed my medial records i was not sure how it was entered, i.e. if wheezing was involved which is again a definate no no. So i thought by putting that letter in my med records which was sent to OASC they would then see that before they see my medical records and understand that it wasnt a wheeze because i sufer from wheeze :confused: but wheeze because i suffered from an URTI. So one, i could be told ive failed at the weekend (which idid) instead of being passed and then told ive failed when they look at my med records a week later!

Booking the docs app today :rolleyes:
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Wzz
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#1748
(Original post by Locost Builder)
Wzz, are you sure?
RILOR's totally different; as you say, it's related to issues arising from a house you own already, or have just bought.

Home to duty used to be a blanket mileage payment to cover you on every journey to work; so if you lived 30 miles away, you were paid 22.3p x 60 per day to come to work. It's dead now.
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steve_nels
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#1749
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#1749
(Original post by Wzz)
Then you really don't know enough about them. How much flying have you done to know it's the be all and end all? You get all of the lifestyle with a slightly different uniform on the ground. If I had terrible eyesight when I went through selection, I would have jumped at it.
I know, i am thinking alot more about it now, dont get me wrong, ive never been naive or arrogant enough or what to honestly beleive that i would walk through selection, its always been a case of ill cross that bridge when i come to it, and i know thats not the right way but thats just the way its turned out.

(Original post by Wzz)
I'm going to play down your chances just because I wouldn't want you to get your hopes up unnecessarily. If it's something derived from the common cold, that implies to me that your body has, at times, had a bad reaction to the common cold, resulting in an URTI. It *is* something your body is reacting to. I've had the common cold so many times I've lost count, but it's never turned into something more serious.
Thats what im hoping the doctor can dig out of the med records and "hopefully" convince the OASC board that it was just a common cold, and that the likeihood of it happening again is as just as likely as anyone else



(Original post by Wzz)
If you're likely to develop an URTI that keeps you off work for a fortnight every time you sit for dinner in the mess next to a guy with a stuffy nose, then you're running into the same problems as people with hayfever. I.e. it might not suddenly attack you while flying like asthma could, but it can knock you out of useful service for periods of time.
I understand that, but for me also, this year for example i have had probs 2 - 3 colds, if not that. So its not a case that i do struggle, but i understand you from that perspective. I was told though that the problems (by being read a short passage from the RAF med bible as it were) that it would be a problem under G-force or/and sudden decompression in the cockpit, all from a common cold? As you say, and as i have always thought, a pilot = human being, therefore if do pick up cold, then will be off of duties until fit again for obvious reasons which im sure involved the reasons i was told.


(Original post by Wzz)
Perfectly natural to be upset; but you've got to realise that it might not be that small. People who have had epileptic fits once in their lives can't believe they get rejected because they might one day suffer another, but the same rules apply.
I understand that as well.Its just that fact that a common cold is keepin me away.



(Original post by Wzz)
Good luck regardless; I'm really sorry to be the voice of doom and gloom but I've seen this sort of thing a lot and someone needs to point out the selectors' points of view.
cheers ill need it ! Thank you very much for your input, and to everyone else much is appreciated just hope my doctor is some specialist in this field. But im not going to give up just yet

Thanks again
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Scorg
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#1750
Well thats me in a bad mood for a while. Just found out that im not qualified enough to be an officer!
all due to the matter of a Maths standard grade being one level below and it seems the module not being recognised or not good enough.
So She suggests doing intermediete 2 maths at college or join as an airman.
I'll be contacting my old college later on anyway.
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peegee
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#1751
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#1751
Bad news, Bad news, Bad news!!! I 'lacerated my cornea' trying to get an eyelash out of my eye! Mr A&E doctor happens to think that it shud be ok in a few days, no permanent damage etc etc etc. Anyone beg to differ? Id like to be let down now rather than in the doc's office in January!
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maverick_87
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#1752
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#1752
[/QUOTE]

Yeah that was me Its a long story but for some reason i had it in my mind years ago that i suffered from asthma, Because i had not viewed my medial records i was not sure how it was entered, i.e. if wheezing was involved which is again a definate no no.[/QUOTE]

So even that weezing condition is going to get you kicked out straight away?

[/QUOTE]
So i thought by putting that letter in my med records which was sent to OASC they would then see that before they see my medical records and understand that it wasnt a wheeze because i sufer from wheeze :confused: but wheeze because i suffered from an URTI. So one, i could be told ive failed at the weekend (which idid) instead of being passed and then told ive failed when they look at my med records a week later!

Booking the docs app today :rolleyes:[/QUOTE]

So did you have to use an inhaler during the time you had this, and if so for how long/ how much did you use it? All I remember regarding what I had was finding it difficult to sleep for a period of a few nights, and coughing a lot during them. I then went to the doctors and was given a inhaler and I never had a problem again. I dont know what the hell it was, I had always thought it was asthma, simply because I associated it with inhalers ect. God i hope it wasnt.

Good luck with your doctors appointment and hopefully you will get this cleared up and successfully apply. What sort of apointment is it your trying to get, Is it a chest specialist or something? it may be what I have to end up trying in a few years!

Oh one more question. Say someone has made it thorugh OASC, been selected for officer training, fast jet training ect, and completes all of them. This costs millions I believe, so what would happen if a new pilot who just passed FJ training cathches ... I dunno asthma or a upper tract lung thing? Would they be kicked out of the RAF immeidatley, passed onto ground crew or what?...
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maverick_87
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#1753
sorry about the unclearness of the quotes but aint got time to change em! off to skool now
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Wzz
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#1754
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#1754
(Original post by steve_nels)
ill cross that bridge when i come to it, and i know thats not the right way but thats just the way its turned out.
The danger being that you end up needing to cross that bridge rapidly having not done enough research into some backup options. If they tell you you've failed part 1 on medical, are you going to go home, or push on to part 2 as a blunty? Best to have a plan.

(Original post by steve_nels)
Thats what im hoping the doctor can dig out of the med records and "hopefully" convince the OASC board that it was just a common cold, and that the likeihood of it happening again is as just as likely as anyone else
My point was; was it a common cold, or an infection resulting from a bad reaction to a common cold? I've had the cold, I've never been told I have an URTI.

(Original post by steve_nels)
I was told though that the problems (by being read a short passage from the RAF med bible as it were) that it would be a problem under G-force or/and sudden decompression in the cockpit, all from a common cold?
You're losing me a bit there. If you have a cold, you have blocked eustachian tubes or blocked sinuses normally. As these try to maintain pressure with the outside world normally, if they're blocked you end up with pressure issues. It manifests itself as an awkward, slightly stingy popping on pressure decrease, and a horrible, agonising stabbing pain and deafness (in the case of the eustachian tubes) on pressure increase.

(Original post by steve_nels)
As you say, and as i have always thought, a pilot = human being
There's your mistake

(Original post by steve_nels)
I understand that as well.Its just that fact that a common cold is keepin me away.
By the looks of things it's upper respiratory tract issues that are keeping you away; regardless of whether they're caused by colds or not. The docs at Cranwell deal with so many people complaining because they think there's a loophole here, or a mistake in their records there; remember that if they say no, generally there's a very good reason.
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Wzz
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(Original post by peegee)
Bad news, Bad news, Bad news!!! I 'lacerated my cornea' trying to get an eyelash out of my eye! Mr A&E doctor happens to think that it shud be ok in a few days, no permanent damage etc etc etc. Anyone beg to differ? Id like to be let down now rather than in the doc's office in January!
Depends how bad it is. Anything which shows up on a corneal map will be a problem during an aircrew part 2 medical.
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BlackHawk
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(Original post by peegee)
Bad news, Bad news, Bad news!!! I 'lacerated my cornea' trying to get an eyelash out of my eye! Mr A&E doctor happens to think that it shud be ok in a few days, no permanent damage etc etc etc. Anyone beg to differ? Id like to be let down now rather than in the doc's office in January!
when are your medicals due? I have mine on Friday and I have just caught a horrible throat infection from my fiance. urrrgh!!
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Wzz
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(Original post by Jamie_JAGGERS)
So even that weezing condition is going to get you kicked out straight away?
Yes.

(Original post by Jamie_JAGGERS)
So did you have to use an inhaler during the time you had this, and if so for how long/ how much did you use it? All I remember regarding what I had was finding it difficult to sleep for a period of a few nights, and coughing a lot during them. I then went to the doctors and was given a inhaler and I never had a problem again. I dont know what the hell it was, I had always thought it was asthma, simply because I associated it with inhalers ect. God i hope it wasnt.
Everyone gets very excited about asthma. Any condition which required the use of an inhaler means you're ineligible; it doesn't matter if it wasn't clinical asthma! If something was wrong with your breathing, which necessitated an inhaler to help widen passages and solve the problem, or if there was any wheezing, then you have or have had a problem which precludes you from flying.

(Original post by Jamie_JAGGERS)
Oh one more question. Say someone has made it thorugh OASC, been selected for officer training, fast jet training ect, and completes all of them. This costs millions I believe, so what would happen if a new pilot who just passed FJ training cathches ... I dunno asthma or a upper tract lung thing? Would they be kicked out of the RAF immeidatley, passed onto ground crew or what?...
It's highly unlikely that you'll spuriously contract asthma after reaching adulthood. There's no particular policy; but if it's DANGEROUS to fly with a condition you develop, then you'll stop flying.
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maverick_87
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#1758
sac;f
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maverick_87
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#1759
dont worry about that last message didnt realise i was logged on. So have you got more info,wzz, wince this subject was last up on here? Cos last time you said that some people MAY be rejected if they have ever used an inhaler, but now is it official that if you have ever used an inhaler you are rejected straight out?

As far as I know I didnt NEED an inhaler, as in I could have done without it; It was just issued to help me out a little when I had a bad cold (and I also remember using it when I ran myself out REALLY badly during a sports day a few months after being issued it) Apart frim these two instances I never used it. Unless I see some chest specialist and get this checked out am i going to be rejected?

As I am starting to have a look at some other options does the Royal Navy require you to have been asthma / wheeze/ upper tract problem free for its officer services other than aircrew?
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Nikki J S
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Steve,

I was just a bit concerned when reading that you had a couple of wheezing episodes as a child. Unfortunately, this may alter the way your URTI’s are viewed, particularly in relation to the asthma family of URTI’s. Asthma can’t be ‘caught’ it’s a disease that anyone can ‘develop’ and is caused by inflammation of the airways that carry air in and out of the lungs. To acquire asthma, people are born with a predisposition to the disease, and the inflammation would not be present in someone who does not have asthma or related conditions. Symptoms can include coughing, wheezing, shortness of breath, or the production of mucus. It’s most common in children up to the age of 5, and in adults in their 30s.

In relation to the wheezing, there are two general patterns in children: nonallergic and allergic. The nonallegenic type gets better as the child gets older because their airways get larger, and half the children who get this type of condition grow out of it. However, it can also go into remission for years, and can often return in later in life. People affected by these diseases are often sensitive to certain conditions and environments, which can trigger URTI infections such as colds, flu, sore throats, and sinus infections. In terms of medication, there are two categories that cover long term and quick relief medicines. From what you’ve said, you received a ‘quick relief’ type of medication to treat acute symptoms. A couple of questions you might be asked to determine whether you ever had asthma, or a related illness, are

Have you had a sudden severe episode or recurrent episodes of coughing, wheezing, or shortness of breath?

Have you ever used any medications that help you breathe better?

Also, as far as flying is concerned, people with asthma type conditions are more likely to be affected by altitude sickness. These sufferers can develop symptoms of light-headedness, headache, fatigue, insomnia, palpitations, loss of appetite, diarrhoea and abdominal pain. Very rapid ascents can cause fluid to gather in the lungs, causing difficulty in breathing. This type of person is often affected by cold conditions, and finds that high altitudes are a problem because the air temperature usually decreases at higher altitudes.

I don’t know if you have a history of URTI’s (including what would be perceived as the common cold/sore throats), but if you have it’s not looking good in terms of a flying career. You really do need to get a specialist opinion, or as Wzz suggested, look at alternative ground branches.
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