Global warming: Melting ice caps - wont affect sea levels

Watch
orionmoo
Badges: 15
Rep:
?
#1
Report Thread starter 11 years ago
#1
Ok, so I was thinking about this the other day. Why would the sea levels rise when/if the ice caps melt? Surely, as my drawing below demonstrates, the water level will stay exactly the same due to the displacement of the ice etc etc. Can someone please explain to me why the sea level would rise, and why this [my drawing] would not occur, is it does in any other body of water, i.e. a glass of water.

0
reply
MichaelG
Badges: 12
Rep:
?
#2
Report 11 years ago
#2
you're taking out the ice then melting it, in real life the ice would still be in the water when it melts.
0
reply
member216084
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#3
Report 11 years ago
#3
Watch An Inconvenient Truth by Al Gore. There's a good (albeit a bit brief) explanation on there about it.
0
reply
orionmoo
Badges: 15
Rep:
?
#4
Report Thread starter 11 years ago
#4
But would it still not have the same effect; as the ice is being melted, theoretically reducing the sea level, it goes back up due to the new addition of water, cancelling each other out hence, the sea level would stay the same?
0
reply
Andylol
Badges: 14
Rep:
?
#5
Report 11 years ago
#5
Ice floats on the water when frozen, but turns into h2o when melted, adding to the water level.
0
reply
Student#1
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#6
Report 11 years ago
#6
This higher temperature may be causing some floating icebergs to melt, but this will not make the oceans rise. Icebergs are large floating chunks of ice.

But the rising temperature and icebergs could play a small role in the rising ocean level. Icebergs are chunks of frozen glaciers that break off from landmasses and fall into the ocean.

The rising temperature may be causing more icebergs to form by weakening the glaciers, causing more cracks and making ice more likely to break off. As soon as the ice falls into the ocean, the ocean rises a little.

^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^¨

THIS!!! :p:
0
reply
orionmoo
Badges: 15
Rep:
?
#7
Report Thread starter 11 years ago
#7
(Original post by Joly)
Watch An Inconvenient Truth by Al Gore. There's a good (albeit a bit brief) explanation on there about it.
We watched half of that in Geography but we turned the other half off as [most] of the graphs has no scales on, amongst other things
0
reply
DJkG.1
Badges: 17
Rep:
?
#8
Report 11 years ago
#8
Much ice is above the water and is attached to solid columns so not therefore displacing any water until it melts and flows into the sea.
0
reply
Mithra
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#9
Report 11 years ago
#9
Just to add some science to this discussion: Water increases in volume when it freezes by quite a lot. Thus the icecaps, when melting, will produce less volume of water than their current volume of ice.
0
reply
shamrock92
Badges: 13
Rep:
?
#10
Report 11 years ago
#10
You silly billy, don't question things! Just blindly accept what the media tells you, like a good boy!
0
reply
didgeridoo12uk
Badges: 16
Rep:
?
#11
Report 11 years ago
#11
all the glaciers would melt and also most o the ice on antartica is on the actualy landmass of antartica, and so not floating
0
reply
MaxMaxMax
Badges: 13
Rep:
?
#12
Report 11 years ago
#12
(Original post by Joly)
Watch An Inconvenient Truth by Al Gore. There's a good (albeit a bit brief) explanation on there about it.
I read an inconvenient truth about Al Gore -apparently his large house gives off 10 times the carbon emissions of the average American's house -despite his constant political posturing about the environment lol
0
reply
Puma
Badges: 14
Rep:
?
#13
Report 11 years ago
#13
Its the perma frost and ica which is not on the water they are worried about. So if we take it into account from your diagram, it would be like throwing a few more ice cuves into the second half. These would come from glaciers etc.
0
reply
ashy
Badges: 15
Rep:
?
#14
Report 11 years ago
#14
Look up the Archimedes Principle.

The Arctic melting wouldn't massively affect sea levels. The Antarctic, or Greenland, however.....:eek:
0
reply
Stratocaster
Badges: 2
Rep:
?
#15
Report 11 years ago
#15
Ice caps on the water melting won't really contribute to sea level rise - it's the glaciers on land that are forced into the sea when the ice caps holding them melt that are the problem. You're technically taking mass from the land and adding it to the sea and then melting it, which really bumps up sea levels. If the Greenland ice sheet and the West Antarctic ice sheet go, we're looking at a possible 12m according to the IPCC 4th.

Also, there's the thermal expansion of water under higher temperatures. There's a proper name for the effect but I can't remember what it is.
1
reply
ashy
Badges: 15
Rep:
?
#16
Report 11 years ago
#16
(Original post by MaxMaxMax)
I read an inconvenient truth about Al Gore -apparently his large house gives off 10 times the carbon emissions of the average American's house -despite his constant political posturing about the environment lol
Does that make his points any less valid?
0
reply
RightSaidJames
Badges: 14
Rep:
?
#17
Report 11 years ago
#17
The "ice caps" aren't floating on the sea, which is the problem. Whether they melt or not isn't the issue, it's that they're falling into the sea in the first place.
0
reply
Nothos
Badges: 14
Rep:
?
#18
Report 11 years ago
#18
Global Warming, eh?

*Goes back into the snow*
0
reply
ashy
Badges: 15
Rep:
?
#19
Report 11 years ago
#19
(Original post by BruceTaylor)
Global Warming, eh?

*Goes back into the snow*
I'd been looking for a chance to use this...

0
reply
Stanyon
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#20
Report 11 years ago
#20
Either the Antartic or Artic Ice Cap is a floating ice cap
Therefore this would have no effect.
If the other one was to melt it would raise sea levels because it is a huge mass.
0
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Back
to top
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

Are you worried that a cap in student numbers would affect your place at uni?

Yes (107)
60.45%
No (36)
20.34%
Not sure (34)
19.21%

Watched Threads

View All