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    Are the bonds between ethanoic acid weaker than those between hydrochloric acid? Could this therefore account for the fact that hydrochloric acid has a higher activation energy than ethanoic?
    Pls help me! I'm stuck with chem coursework. THANX!!
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    I think that ethanoic acid has a higher pH level so that means that it is a stronger acid and it is stronger but i'm only year 7 so i might be wrong
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    (Original post by Golz)
    I think that ethanoic acid has a higher pH level so that means that it is a stronger acid and it is stronger but i'm only year 7 so i might be wrong
    If it has a higher pH level it will be a weaker acid. The strongest acid is pH 1.
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    Hydrochloric acid is a strong acid as it's molecule do not dissociate to form ions in solution as readily as the molecules in ethanoic acid do. I.e. put into solution ethanoic acid - CH3COOH - forms ethanoate (or something) - CH3COO- ions- and H+ ions readily. HCl does not dissociate as easily into H+ and Cl - ions when in solution.

    Therefore, as ethanoic acid dissociates more readily, the bond enthalpies are weaker than those in HCl. This is due to the valencies of the molecules involved. The -Cl bond in HCl is stronger than that of the -OH bond in CH3COOH (I think due to Cl being a more electronegative element?)

    When these molecules are involved in a reaction, the energy required to overcome the bond enthalpies and break the bonds in order to start the reaction (i.e the activation energy) will be higher for those molecules with higher bond energies. Therefore HCl will have a higher activation energy as the energy required to break the H-Cl bond will be greater than the energy needed to break the bonds in CH3COOH.

    At least, that's what I think. I stand ready to be corrected!

    Thanx 4 that!!! That sounds convincing enough for me.
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    (Original post by Lord Huntroyde)
    If it has a higher pH level it will be a weaker acid. The strongest acid is pH 1.
    Sorry i have to rephrase it.
    i think ethanoic acid has a lower pH level which makes it a strong avid

    Actually Ive just realised u sed ethanoic acid dissociates more easily into ions than hydrochloric acid. I always thought it was the other way round. Are you sure that ethanoic dissociates more readily? what's the reason 4 it?
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    (Original post by Lord Huntroyde)
    If it has a higher pH level it will be a weaker acid. The strongest acid is pH 1.
    I think you can get pHs other than 1-14, but because it's worked out on a log basis, it's just extremely impractical.
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    (Original post by ++Hex++)
    I think you can get pHs other than 1-14, but because it's worked out on a log basis, it's just extremely impractical.
    I thought that as I typed that post but I thought for simplicities sake...
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    (Original post by Lord Huntroyde)
    If it has a higher pH level it will be a weaker acid. The strongest acid is pH 1.
    the strongest acid would be pH -infinity
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    (Original post by Lord Huntroyde)
    I thought that as I typed that post but I thought for simplicities sake...
    Most of my friends complain that everything I explain is too complicated, I just like the details.
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    (Original post by elpaw)
    the strongest acid would be pH -infinity
    OK, I was talking simple, Key Stages 3 and 4 classroom acids.
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    (Original post by Psyche)
    Hydrochloric acid is a strong acid as it's molecule do not dissociate to form ions in solution as readily as the molecules in ethanoic acid do. I.e. put into solution ethanoic acid - CH3COOH - forms ethanoate (or something) - CH3COO- ions- and H+ ions readily. HCl does not dissociate as easily into H+ and Cl - ions when in solution.
    Hydrochloric acid dissasociates completely in water. all of it turns into ions. Ethanoic acid forms an equilibrium with the water, meaning that as some molecules are dissasociating, others are rejoining, so it is not as strong.
 
 
 
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