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    Right I am gonna start this thread in the effort that perhaps I can convey to people that grades on paper do not dictate what you are, or what you can become in life. Feel free to contribute.

    I use to believe that getting the A grades was the most important thing in life. When I was in school and was given homework, I use to do them straight away and do the extra little questions they had on top. But it wasn't until my current third year in college that I realised grades were not everything. One must learn to weigh your life socially and academically.

    There are a number of people who post on these boards, who are high achievers, with five A's at A-level. However not everybody is like that.

    I believe one does not need to have four A's to get ahead in life. Sure, it may make it easier, but grades do not dictate who or what you play in your life. YOU ARE the one who decides what they want. If you are hardworking, determined and optimistic, you will achieve the ful potential of yourself. there is no point in giving up, just cause you got a U at A-level. Just look on the bright side, at least they did not give up and drop the subject half way, they persevered with the subject, but never gave up in it.

    If one who attains CCC, and another gets AAA and they both have a degree in Medicine and practice in a surgeon. Its unfair to say that you would not trust Mr CCC with your health. If Mr CCC had 25 years of experience, whilst Mr AAA had been practicing for 6 months, I know which one I would prefer.

    I dont understand the mentality of people these says, they base so much bias and emphasis on those people who have achieved the top grade. If the bus driver had DDDD is he less qualified than somebody who got AAAA at driving buses. If you knew what grades they got, would it put you off catching the bus?

    It is with this, I leave you to ponder, whilst I make my way to my nice and comfortable bed.
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    Very well written.

    I used to be exactly like you, I thought A grades were all that mattered. No, actually make that A* grades, getting an A at GCSE I thought to be "crap". I had the idea that academic merit was all that mattered to determine who's 'superior'. Then it was night of GCSE results I'm sitting there thinking "9A*s, best results in the school, in the local papers and radio...so what? Doesn't mean I'm happy, I've missed out on a lot of norms of teenage life..."

    Throughout 6th form and the first year of uni I had a growing feeling about how insignificant academia is to wellbeing. Linking success to affluence made me think even more, with stories through the year such as Britain's 3rd richest billionaire being a manic depressive, Mariah Carey having a breakdown and Robbie Williams screwed fighting drugs/alcohol.

    So I was just thinking "what's the point of it all?" - people tend to desire good grades to go onto high-flying things...it seems to just result in depression. Ex-classmates who didn't get the grades are possibly happier and more satisfied in life. On a global scale, beggars on the streets of India or homeless in Africa are possibly more content than some American famous billionaires. Indeed, a recent survey had Italians bottom of the 'happiness' league.

    These feelings all hit their lowest point last year, when it got to the point I was thinking "What's the point in life?" - you're just going to die at the end of the day, and it won't make any difference whether you've achieved a lot in life or were a loser.

    Fortunately this all stopped over the summer, and I have the newly found philosophy to live life to the full. However, this has meant literally 20hr days, a few all-nighters etc as I've got heavily involved in the uni scene, part of/running for various committees etc. It's a good feeling to be involved, productive and be recognised. I'm on top of the world right now, never felt better.

    It's important to note the "whatever floats your boat" logic. For a lot of people, happiness is a life of one-night stands and drugs. Fair enough. For a lot of people on this board it's likely to be desiring to achieve good grades for a good job etc.

    Sorry for rambling slightly off the topic...!
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    (Original post by Bhaal85)
    Right I am gonna start this thread in the effort that perhaps I can convey to people that grades on paper do not dictate what you are, or what you can become in life. Feel free to contribute.

    I use to believe that getting the A grades was the most important thing in life. When I was in school and was given homework, I use to do them straight away and do the extra little questions they had on top. But it wasn't until my current third year in college that I realised grades were not everything. One must learn to weigh your life socially and academically.

    There are a number of people who post on these boards, who are high achievers, with five A's at A-level. However not everybody is like that.

    I believe one does not need to have four A's to get ahead in life. Sure, it may make it easier, but grades do not dictate who or what you play in your life. YOU ARE the one who decides what they want. If you are hardworking, determined and optimistic, you will achieve the ful potential of yourself. there is no point in giving up, just cause you got a U at A-level. Just look on the bright side, at least they did not give up and drop the subject half way, they persevered with the subject, but never gave up in it.

    If one who attains CCC, and another gets AAA and they both have a degree in Medicine and practice in a surgeon. Its unfair to say that you would not trust Mr CCC with your health. If Mr CCC had 25 years of experience, whilst Mr AAA had been practicing for 6 months, I know which one I would prefer.

    I dont understand the mentality of people these says, they base so much bias and emphasis on those people who have achieved the top grade. If the bus driver had DDDD is he less qualified than somebody who got AAAA at driving buses. If you knew what grades they got, would it put you off catching the bus?

    It is with this, I leave you to ponder, whilst I make my way to my nice and comfortable bed.
    Ok, I agree with most of what you're saying.
    However, regarding the specific example of medicine. If someone has a medical degree and passed all his exams and became a fellow of the Royal College of Surgeons, then his A-levels are pretty much irrelevant. However, if someone only manages to achieve CCC, then it would a) be harder for him/her to get into medical school b) it would suggest they would struggle with the course and all the has to be learnt and applied c) it would suggest they would struggle with surgical exams, which are some of the hardest in the world.
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    (Original post by DanMushMan)
    Ok, I agree with most of what you're saying.
    However, regarding the specific example of medicine. If someone has a medical degree and passed all his exams and became a fellow of the Royal College of Surgeons, then his A-levels are pretty much irrelevant. However, if someone only manages to achieve CCC, then it would a) be harder for him/her to get into medical school b) it would suggest they would struggle with the course and all the has to be learnt and applied c) it would suggest they would struggle with surgical exams, which are some of the hardest in the world.

    On point A, yes, naturally the chances of someone getting into medical school with lower than ABB are very slim.

    On point B, although I very vaguely agree, I think there's an incorrect assumption you may have implictily made. Learning, education or intellectual ability (whatever you want to call it) is often not linear. What I mean to say is that someone with very high A level grades may not do too well at university level, and vice versa. Some people develop their abilities later than others. It may just be that they're not so mature at 18, or not too bothered about academia. You may call such cases exceptions, however they're very significant exceptions, if indeed they are. There are a very large proportion of people for whom academic progress at school bears absolutely no correlation to what they later go onto academically achieve.

    (Original post by Bhaal85)
    I believe one does not need to have four A's to get ahead in life. Sure, it may make it easier, but grades do not dictate who or what you play in your life. YOU ARE the one who decides what they want. If you are hardworking, determined and optimistic, you will achieve the ful potential of yourself. there is no point in giving up, just cause you got a U at A-level. Just look on the bright side, at least they did not give up and drop the subject half way, they persevered with the subject, but never gave up in it.
    Amen.
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    (Original post by *-mjg-*)
    Amen.
    what?
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    (Original post by Bhaal85)
    Right I am gonna start this thread in the effort that perhaps I can convey to people that grades on paper do not dictate what you are, or what you can become in life. Feel free to contribute.

    I use to believe that getting the A grades was the most important thing in life. When I was in school and was given homework, I use to do them straight away and do the extra little questions they had on top. But it wasn't until my current third year in college that I realised grades were not everything. One must learn to weigh your life socially and academically.

    There are a number of people who post on these boards, who are high achievers, with five A's at A-level. However not everybody is like that.

    I believe one does not need to have four A's to get ahead in life. Sure, it may make it easier, but grades do not dictate who or what you play in your life. YOU ARE the one who decides what they want. If you are hardworking, determined and optimistic, you will achieve the ful potential of yourself. there is no point in giving up, just cause you got a U at A-level. Just look on the bright side, at least they did not give up and drop the subject half way, they persevered with the subject, but never gave up in it.

    If one who attains CCC, and another gets AAA and they both have a degree in Medicine and practice in a surgeon. Its unfair to say that you would not trust Mr CCC with your health. If Mr CCC had 25 years of experience, whilst Mr AAA had been practicing for 6 months, I know which one I would prefer.

    I dont understand the mentality of people these says, they base so much bias and emphasis on those people who have achieved the top grade. If the bus driver had DDDD is he less qualified than somebody who got AAAA at driving buses. If you knew what grades they got, would it put you off catching the bus?

    It is with this, I leave you to ponder, whilst I make my way to my nice and comfortable bed.
    I think its right to say that is it important to sustain a balance of ones social life, eg i hardly bothered about GCSE revision until the nite bfore. Just askin, ne tips on A Level success in English Lit, Maths, History and Politics?

    Live Life to the Limit
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    you lot are to deep instead of worring that you did to well be grateful you had the chance to do well
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    (Original post by angel D)
    you lot are to deep instead of worring that you did to well be grateful you had the chance to do well
    How come so many ancient threads keep getting resurrected :confused:
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    (Original post by angel D)
    you lot are to deep instead of worring that you did to well be grateful you had the chance to do well
    agree
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    (Original post by 2776)
    agree
    same as
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    well said bhaal and jools, but unfortunately the choice between academic and social success isn't always so straightforward.

    i too realised (probably hit me in about year 9 or 10, i reckon, whenever it was it was too late) that whatever time we have should be spent to be enjoyed, not to live up to other people's notions of success.

    i've always been pretty clever (nothing really special though) and yet never really popular and socially happy - and as we all know (not so much at college and uni) but at school the greater academic success one has the harder social success becomes (at least thats my experience)

    but its not so simple as to be able to change one's philospohy, to "live life to the full". After a while of being a "bod" or whatever you want to call it its difficult to change - after all how can you have a good social life without friends and people to enjoy life with?

    i dont wanna sound like a loner, cos i do have some mates, but i cant wait for uni cos then i know it will be much easier to enjoy myself as i will be more or less forced to meet new people and go out and have fun...until then it pretty difficult, and the main thing i can think of doing is to revise and try and get those As after all...
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    agree.
    but good grades make u feel good, for life. its like a drug.
 
 
 
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