freddy2222
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is economics at glasgow university maths based.
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0404343m
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Not really, its an M.A. rather than a BSc, so there is more maths based economic degrees than Glasgow's out there. That said, you can really can get into the maths in third year should you so wish, theres a lot of optional modules with a high maths content you can choose if you are that way inclined.

Because the large maths element is not compulsory though, it retains the M.A. name (as well as no requirement for maths at higher), rather than the BSc.
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freddy2222
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are yoou at glasgow
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0404343m
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Yes.
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freddy2222
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is there a choice then of doing it maths based or with no maths at all. could someone who has little knowledge of maths progress well?
also assuming you are doing economics what career would you like using this degree.
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0404343m
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I did economics, mainly history, but I'm doing a Ph.D in economic history from September, although I am not sure which University it will be at yet, but I will not be seeking employment as an economist, if thats what you're meaning.

There is a compulsory maths element, but its not that bad. I don't consider myself good at maths, although I am good at mental arithmetic, but the maths element shouldn't be a problem, and as mentioned, you can avoid most of it if you so wish. Level 2 economics has an 'introduction to mathematical economics' and 'data analysis' which both have maths elements. So you won't get away with doing no maths at all.

There is a degree in Economic History, which links the two together (i.e. wall street crash and the depression, the industrial revolution etc etc), which brings economics and applies it to important events of the 19th and 20th century. Even that has a compulsory computer project though, and you will be expected to understand graphs and trends, etc. All that said, the maths isn't bad- you can see where its going, i.e. if a company has two revenue sources, P1 and P2, and has profit margins of X and overheads of Y, work out various things. They don't expect you to have a higher or A-level in maths, unlike some BSc courses do, so evidently they think that most people should be able to cope.
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freddy2222
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well lets put it this way...i had terrible maths teachers and so done bad there...but i got a B in higher physics which uses problem solving and lots of equations and numbers, so if i can do physics could i do the maths element.
thanks for your help too.
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0404343m
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No problem at all.

If you can pass Physics, then you are obviously not naturally bad at maths, as the two are closely linked. The equations in higher physics won't be all that much easier than the maths you'll be required to do here- I'm sure you'll be fine.
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Oogamy
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Keep in mind that you'd be expected to take two other subjects in first and second year. Level 1 and 2 mathematics and statistics seem to be popular with economics students just as much as arts and humanities.
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keepoffthelawn
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*lifting this thread*
and also, if there's any former or current students who do economics at Glasgow it would be cool to hear opinions about it! Also, how respected is an economics degree from Glasgow?
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0404343m
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(Original post by keepoffthelawn)
*lifting this thread*
and also, if there's any former or current students who do economics at Glasgow it would be cool to hear opinions about it! Also, how respected is an economics degree from Glasgow?
When you've been around Uni as long as some of us, you realise this 'respected' thing is a bit of a nonsense. I'm not suggesting all degrees are equal, but to suggest that a theres a strict heirarchy which goes from York > Glasgow > Cardiff or vice versa, is just rubbish. Take Oxbridge and the LSE out, do the same with lots of ex-polys and they're all much of a muchness, regardless of what league tables say. I don't think theres any discernable difference between any of the older Scottish Unis anyway, Glasgow, Strathclyde, Edinburgh etc are all much the same- it'll be more down to the individual candidate. Advantages may be given to the M.A(or B.A.). in certain circumstances, or Universities which award the BSc (more maths) in others. Thats nothing to do with 'university respect' though.

I've only a year and a half experience of it, but I found it pretty good, I mean, Adam Smith practically invented Modern Economics at this University, so we like to think we teach it the right way. I'm now in the field of Economic History, so I like to think I know a good bit about the subject and its applications, but yeah, unless you get an offer from Oxbridge or the LSE for Economics, Glasgow is on a par with any of the next best group, so you'll be doing alright for yourself if you come out with a good final degree.
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keepoffthelawn
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okay i get where you're coming from with that.. I'm an international student and i've never even been to Scotland before and don't really know about how different unis are regarded in the UK so i'm just trying to find out whatever i can through the internet :p:, but i suppose its true that all those uni guides etc are just one view and that the best choice isn't the same for everyone..
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Smileytwin
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(Original post by 0404343m)
When you've been around Uni as long as some of us, you realise this 'respected' thing is a bit of a nonsense. I'm not suggesting all degrees are equal, but to suggest that a theres a strict heirarchy which goes from York > Glasgow > Cardiff or vice versa, is just rubbish. Take Oxbridge and the LSE out, do the same with lots of ex-polys and they're all much of a muchness, regardless of what league tables say. I don't think theres any discernable difference between any of the older Scottish Unis anyway, Glasgow, Strathclyde, Edinburgh etc are all much the same- it'll be more down to the individual candidate. Advantages may be given to the M.A(or B.A.). in certain circumstances, or Universities which award the BSc (more maths) in others. Thats nothing to do with 'university respect' though.

I've only a year and a half experience of it, but I found it pretty good, I mean, Adam Smith practically invented Modern Economics at this University, so we like to think we teach it the right way. I'm now in the field of Economic History, so I like to think I know a good bit about the subject and its applications, but yeah, unless you get an offer from Oxbridge or the LSE for Economics, Glasgow is on a par with any of the next best group, so you'll be doing alright for yourself if you come out with a good final degree.
Would you overall recommend doing economics at Glasgow then? Also are there some development modules included as that's what really interests me? I can't really decide if I should go for Glasgow or not so some advice would be greately appreciated
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.ACS.
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(Original post by Smileytwin)
Would you overall recommend doing economics at Glasgow then? Also are there some development modules included as that's what really interests me? I can't really decide if I should go for Glasgow or not so some advice would be greately appreciated
http://www.gla.ac.uk/departments/eco...e/courseindex/

The above is a link to the courses available on the MA Economics course at Glasgow. As you can see, there are a number of modules in development economics.
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0404343m
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(Original post by Smileytwin)
Would you overall recommend doing economics at Glasgow then? Also are there some development modules included as that's what really interests me? I can't really decide if I should go for Glasgow or not so some advice would be greately appreciated
There is, yes. Bear in mind these change year on year, and your first two years (before you get into the option-laden set up in 3rd/4th year) is pretty general. If you're thinking of arriving in 2010, then it'll be 2012/3 before you get down to these modules, so there'd be little point in me saying exactly what to expect by then.

As for the university and its environment, I can wholeheartedly recommend it. 1/6 of the near 25,000 students are from outside the UK, and the Scandinavians are one of the biggest groups, so there's traditionally very good international student support. The West End feels very different to the rest of the city, and there's more pubs/clubs/music/shops/students/transport links than any city outside of London. Whether its right for you though, is another matter. What works for some of us doesn't for others, so if you can, take a long weekend in Scotland, and go visiting the places. From Edinburgh you can cover probably 10 Scottish universities within a 90min drive, which might be useful. Edinburgh city is visually stunning, but has a very different feel to Glasgow, and I'd argue it lacks the campus community element, but only you can decide whats best for you.
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sil3nt_cha0s
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who bumped another really old thread yet again?!
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Smileytwin
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(Original post by 0404343m)
There is, yes. Bear in mind these change year on year, and your first two years (before you get into the option-laden set up in 3rd/4th year) is pretty general. If you're thinking of arriving in 2010, then it'll be 2012/3 before you get down to these modules, so there'd be little point in me saying exactly what to expect by then.

As for the university and its environment, I can wholeheartedly recommend it. 1/6 of the near 25,000 students are from outside the UK, and the Scandinavians are one of the biggest groups, so there's traditionally very good international student support. The West End feels very different to the rest of the city, and there's more pubs/clubs/music/shops/students/transport links than any city outside of London. Whether its right for you though, is another matter. What works for some of us doesn't for others, so if you can, take a long weekend in Scotland, and go visiting the places. From Edinburgh you can cover probably 10 Scottish universities within a 90min drive, which might be useful. Edinburgh city is visually stunning, but has a very different feel to Glasgow, and I'd argue it lacks the campus community element, but only you can decide whats best for you.
Would you say that the economics seminars etc are more interesting and "inspiring" than in school? I realise that this is a quite weird question I just mean that if I didn't really enjoy for example macroeconomics in school will it be the same in uni? Also how are the seminars in general; are the lecturers and teachers good and do you think a economics graduate from the University of Glasgow has good career prospects? I'm sorry about all the questions, I hope it's okay
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0404343m
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(Original post by Smileytwin)
Would you say that the economics seminars etc are more interesting and "inspiring" than in school? I realise that this is a quite weird question I just mean that if I didn't really enjoy for example macroeconomics in school will it be the same in uni? Also how are the seminars in general; are the lecturers and teachers good and do you think a economics graduate from the University of Glasgow has good career prospects? I'm sorry about all the questions, I hope it's okay
These really aren't questions I (or anyone) can answer with much accuracy. There's about 30 staff members and a group of PhD students who will do the teaching- most people will go through University never being in contact with 2/3 of any given department. There are some teachers who are more engaging than others, but whether these people will ever teach you is another matter. The first two years are very general in Scotland- I can't possibly say if you will be more interested in certain things than you were in school, everyone finds different parts of the course to their tastes. I will say you won't really have much choice in first year on the economics or maths side of things, but that will change into 2nd/3rd/4th year. The course is pretty flexible- most of the maths is an optional extra which you can be dropped if you decide that branch of economics isn't for you, but you can decide for yourself on that one.

As for employability- again, thats very much down to the individual candidate. I know a good few econ grads who (even in this climate) haven't found employment a problem. They were very much among the 'better' students though- a 3rd class grad will be up against it, but then again so will anyone with a 3rd, regardless of institution. The Scottish universities are generally a bit underestimated in England, at least on TSR, but if you prove yourself to be a strong student, I don't foresee any employment problems- although thats many years in the future. Worry about finding a place that you think is right for you first, thats the important thing.
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Smileytwin
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(Original post by 0404343m)
These really aren't questions I (or anyone) can answer with much accuracy. There's about 30 staff members and a group of PhD students who will do the teaching- most people will go through University never being in contact with 2/3 of any given department. There are some teachers who are more engaging than others, but whether these people will ever teach you is another matter. The first two years are very general in Scotland- I can't possibly say if you will be more interested in certain things than you were in school, everyone finds different parts of the course to their tastes. I will say you won't really have much choice in first year on the economics or maths side of things, but that will change into 2nd/3rd/4th year. The course is pretty flexible- most of the maths is an optional extra which you can be dropped if you decide that branch of economics isn't for you, but you can decide for yourself on that one.

As for employability- again, thats very much down to the individual candidate. I know a good few econ grads who (even in this climate) haven't found employment a problem. They were very much among the 'better' students though- a 3rd class grad will be up against it, but then again so will anyone with a 3rd, regardless of institution. The Scottish universities are generally a bit underestimated in England, at least on TSR, but if you prove yourself to be a strong student, I don't foresee any employment problems- although thats many years in the future. Worry about finding a place that you think is right for you first, thats the important thing.
Hey thanx for the info, I figured my questions were a bit hard to answer but you did a good job May I ask what you studied though and do you know anything about the business economics course, how does that really differ from straight economics?
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0404343m
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(Original post by Smileytwin)
Hey thanx for the info, I figured my questions were a bit hard to answer but you did a good job May I ask what you studied though and do you know anything about the business economics course, how does that really differ from straight economics?
I studied history, but I'm doing graduate work in Economic History, and lots of my modules were in the dept of Economic and Social History which crosses over a good bit with both the Business School and the department of Economics. I've taken modules in two years in econ, so while I wouldn't call myself an economist, it made up around a quarter of my degree, so I have a relatively good grounding in it (or at least as good a grounding as a historian needs to have). I don't know much about the business economics course, but I'd hazard a guess there'd be more compulsory business modules, perhaps giving you management and marketing options, which aren't a requirement of the economics degree. I'm afraid I can't tell you much more than that.
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