I Have No Imagination
Badges: 14
Rep:
?
#1
Report Thread starter 12 years ago
#1
Hi

I'm currently in year 12 and I want to do some reading based on Dentistry.
Does anyone know of any good books that would make sense to me. I know at interviews they can ask you about anything, just want to brush up my knowledge.

Cheers.
0
reply
vesi
Badges: 5
Rep:
?
#2
Report 12 years ago
#2
I think you can find really useful information on the internet, but as you specifically asked for a book i would reccomend Oxford Handbook of Applied Dental Sciences. It is written for first and second year dental students as a help read. See which topics are covered in it here :http://www.amazon.com/Oxford-Handboo...4591481&sr=8-1
And there are many other bookshttp://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_ss_gw...tistry&x=0&y=0
But bear in mind that the information in these books is very detailed :P
1
reply
Magnanimity
Badges: 14
Rep:
?
#3
Report 12 years ago
#3
Oxford Handbook of Clinical Dentistry

David Mitchell, Laura Mitchell.

Excellent wee book. If you get in you'll use it for your whole degree too. However, I'd recommend getting most of your knowledge and experience from work exp.
1
reply
yosrush
Badges: 12
Rep:
?
#4
Report 12 years ago
#4
I just used wiki a day before my interviews; no point studying for something you haven't applied for yet, you might even change your mind between now and then! You're best to get some work exp first if you haven't already, as junglemonkey said.
0
reply
star08
Badges: 1
#5
Report 12 years ago
#5
(Original post by I Have No Imagination)
Hi

I'm currently in year 12 and I want to do some reading based on Dentistry.
Does anyone know of any good books that would make sense to me. I know at interviews they can ask you about anything, just want to brush up my knowledge.

Cheers.
what dental schools are you looking to apply?
0
reply
I Have No Imagination
Badges: 14
Rep:
?
#6
Report Thread starter 12 years ago
#6
(Original post by star08)
what dental schools are you looking to apply?
KCL, Manchester, Liverpool, Dundee, QMUL.

Those are just rough Ideas.
1
reply
Magnanimity
Badges: 14
Rep:
?
#7
Report 12 years ago
#7
(Original post by MC)
:eek3:
LOL, are you being serious? That's way too detailed for what you need at an interview. I would think wikipedia is more than sufficient. Interviewers are not looking for dentists, but prospective dentists.
I know. And I never read a book before my interviews. I picked everything up from work experience which is why I've recommended doing work exp instead.

If he's gonna read one though, it's the best overview IMO. Some people will go the extra (unnecessary) mile.

Personally I think he's best sticking to Colgate type leaflets lol.
0
reply
Hmughal
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#8
Report 12 years ago
#8
(Original post by junglemonkey)
I know. And I never read a book before my interviews. I picked everything up from work experience which is why I've recommended doing work exp instead.

If he's gonna read one though, it's the best overview IMO. Some people will go the extra (unnecessary) mile.

Personally I think he's best sticking to Colgate type leaflets lol.
^^where do i get them from, any online? i got an interview coming up.
0
reply
Magnanimity
Badges: 14
Rep:
?
#9
Report 12 years ago
#9
(Original post by Hmughal)
^^where do i get them from, any online? i got an interview coming up.
http://www.dentalhealth.org.uk/faqs/browseleaflets.php
http://www.colgate.co.uk/app/OralHea.../UK/Guide.cvsp

Google is your friend
1
reply
Hmughal
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#10
Report 12 years ago
#10
Thank you for that. Where can i find information regarding the issues (nhs contract), ethics, etc? Any specific sites for this? I hear they really grill you on stuff like this at KCL interviews and the their assessment.
0
reply
vesi
Badges: 5
Rep:
?
#11
Report 12 years ago
#11
Here is some of the information I used to prepare for questions about the NHS.
These are basucaly articles or parts of articles, I have found on the net.
Having this knowledge you can come up with a reasonably good answer.
Hope it helps

NHS dentistry reforms 'failing'

Health Select Committee chairman Kevin Barron on the report
Changes designed to improve NHS dental services in England have not been successful, a report by MPs says.
The new contract, introduced in 2006, was intended to simplify charges and make it easier to find an NHS dentist.
But the Commons Health Committee said access remained "patchy" and there had been a sharp fall in the number of complex procedures.
The Department of Health insisted the reforms - which were later adopted in Wales - were starting to work.

While we readily accept that in some areas of the country, provision of NHS dentistry is good, overall provision is patchy

Kevin Barron MP
House of Commons Health Committee

Q&A: Dental reforms

The new contract, under which patients paid fixed charges for particular types of procedure, also gave local primary care trusts the power to commission and pay for dental services.
It has been rolled out to cover Wales, although the report only deals with progress in England.
The number of patients seen fell by 900,000 in the 18 months following the introduction of the new contract in April 2006, the report said.
In the first year of the contract, the number of complex treatments - including bridges and crowns - which involve laboratory work was halved, and the number of root canal treatments fell by 45%. Both of these attract higher fees under the new scheme.
The committee said there were concerns that some patients were not getting the complex treatment they needed.
Conversely, the number of tooth extractions rose.
In Scotland and Northern Ireland, not covered by the changes, the number of complex treatments rose.
No pilots
The committee also heard fears that the changes had not stemmed the exodus of NHS dentists into private-only practices, although the Department of Health said that was unlikely.

It highlights the failure of a farcical contract that has alienated the profession and caused uncertainty to patients

Susie Sanderson
British Dental Association
Committee chairman Kevin Barron MP said: "It is disappointing that so far the new contract has failed to improve the patient's experience of dental services.
"While we readily accept that in some areas of the country, provision of NHS dentistry is good, overall provision is patchy."
He criticised the Department of Health for not piloting the new contract on a smaller scale prior to introduction.
The committee called on the government to improve PCT commissioning and review the "units of activity" system to make sure it rewarded dentists for choosing the most appropriate treatment.
'Farcical'
Susie Sanderson, from the British Dental Association, described it as a "damning report".

The focus and funding is already starting to show results

Department of Health
"It highlights the failure of a farcical contract that has alienated the profession and caused uncertainty to patients," she said.
"For the past two years, dentists and patients have told the Department of Health that it got it wrong."
A Department of Health spokesman said it would "carefully consider" the recommendations but that the benefits of the reforms were already emerging.
"We have invested over £200m in NHS dentistry this year, over and above increases in the last three years. This takes our total investment to over £2bn.
"The focus and funding is already starting to show results - patients are starting to see the benefits with new NHS practices opening all over the country, and we are working with the NHS to ensure that, as the committee recommends, the quality of dental commissioning by PCTs improves."












NHS

National Health Service dentistry
On April 1 2006, the most significant reforms to NHS dentistry since its inception in 1948 were introduced.
These reforms are benefiting patients by improving access to NHS dental services and by replacing the old, complicated charging system with three simple, standard price bands.
These pages provide information about NHS dental services in England and answer some common questions about NHS dentistry.
Simpler charging
There are now three standard charges for all NHS dental treatments. This makes it easier to know how much you may need to pay and also helps to ensure that you are being charged for NHS care (rather than private care).
The maximum charge for a complex course of treatment is £198*.
Most courses of treatment cost £16.20* or £44.60*.
* These charges apply from April 1 2008.
You still receive free NHS dental treatment if you meet the exemption criteria. For more information see our 'Help with health costs' section.
Better access to local services
Your primary care trust (PCT) is now responsible for local NHS dental services. It:
• has money that must be used for local dental services,
• agrees contracts with NHS dentists for services that best meet local needs,
• can influence where new practices are established, and
• is responsible for urgent and out-of-hours care in your area.
If a dentist moves, closes a practice or reduces the amount of NHS dentistry he or she provides, the money to provide this service now remains with your PCT for reinvestment in NHS dentistry for the local community.
Over time this is helping PCTs to ensure that NHS dental services better meet the needs of people in your area.


Problems continue two years on from new dental contract
27th Aug 2008
NHS dentists and their patients still face significant problems two years after the introduction of the new contract in April 2006.

That's according to reports by the NHS Information Centre.

They show that more than one million fewer patients in England have been able to access NHS dentistry since the introduction of a new contract for dentists and patient charges in April 2006.

The number of patients accessing NHS dentistry in England in the 24 months prior to 31 March 2008 was 27,049,000, compared to 28,145,000 in the 24 months prior to 31 March 2006.
The reports also appear to highlight changes to the type of treatments patients are receiving.

Susie Sanderson, chair of the BDA's Executive Board, said: ‘These reports provide further evidence of the persisting problems with the 2006 NHS dental reforms. More than a million people have now lost access to NHS dental care.

‘Those that are able to access care are confronted with a system that discourages modern, preventive care by placing targets, rather than patients, at its heart.

‘This is difficult for dentists, who want to focus on providing the best possible care for their patients.

‘The apparent change in treatment patterns is also of concern and requires further investigation so that the impact of the new contract is fully understood. Such an investigation was recommended by MPs last month in the report of the Health Select Committee.

‘The Government must take note of what these reports, patients and the profession and even the Health Select Committee have told them and act to resolve the issues facing NHS dentistry in England and Wales.

‘It is also important that primary care trusts and dentists are properly resourced and supported to ensure the commissioning work they are doing is effective and meets patients' needs.'










NHS Contract

Dentist’s questions:
Can I give priority to my registered patient?

Under the new arrangements, no patient is registered. You may refuse to treat any patient on reasonable grounds not related to age sex, gender, race, religion or dental condition, and if you don’t have the ‘capacity’ to see them (how this is defined is up to the PCT!). However, there is no patient list, and patients may apply to any practice with an NHS contract.

Can I still mix treatment for a patient?

Yes, you can, but the patient must sign a new equivalent to form FP17DC, which must be kept with the records. Since all treatment is contractually available on the NHS, you will have to show that the patient has consented to the private treatment freely, and you cannot mislead the patient about the quality of care available on the NHS.
3
reply
Hmughal
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#12
Report 12 years ago
#12
(Original post by vesi)
Here is some of the information I used to prepare for questions about the NHS.
These are basucaly articles or parts of articles, I have found on the net.
Having this knowledge you can come up with a reasonably good answer.
Hope it helps

NHS dentistry reforms 'failing'
......
it does help thank you very much
0
reply
gangst
Badges: 1
Rep:
?
#13
Report 12 years ago
#13
Buy a dental book for training nurses. One of the Dentist's who I did work exp. with gave me one and it was ideal, really concise and covered most aspects of Dentistry, ideal for interviews.

This is the book I was given http://www.amazon.co.uk/Textbook-Den...7128842&sr=8-3

good buy.
0
reply
maryamyamyam
Badges: 1
Rep:
?
#14
Report 9 months ago
#14
i cant believe i just found this 11 years later, im a year 12 student in the exact position as you were looking at basically the same unis. wow
0
reply
j0hncen4
Badges: 7
Rep:
?
#15
Report 6 months ago
#15
(Original post by maryamyamyam)
i cant believe i just found this 11 years later, im a year 12 student in the exact position as you were looking at basically the same unis. wow
lol same here
0
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Back
to top
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

Feeling behind at school/college? What is the best thing your teachers could to help you catch up?

Extra compulsory independent learning activities (eg, homework tasks) (15)
6.61%
Run extra compulsory lessons or workshops (34)
14.98%
Focus on making the normal lesson time with them as high quality as possible (38)
16.74%
Focus on making the normal learning resources as high quality/accessible as possible (34)
14.98%
Provide extra optional activities, lessons and/or workshops (61)
26.87%
Assess students, decide who needs extra support and focus on these students (45)
19.82%

Watched Threads

View All