EmmaDilemma
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NCIShippo
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Having never studied Henry II this may not be very good but you could start with something like . . .

What makes a ''courageous and strong'' king is often dependant upon the times. The actions that occured throughout his reign, and how he represented the country from (insert dates here), truely demonstrates how his position as monach benefitted the people of his country, and resulted in a well regarded society.

. . . How was that?
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NCIShippo
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Ooh thats great.. Its not the actual question for my essay so I just made up one to see how it would fit in to the introduction. But that really helped thankyou!!
Cool . . . it appears I can waffle an intro to a history essay . . . worth remembering!
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Sam o0o
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Define exactly what the question is asking, and then put it into context; the period, what was going on etc. Lay out the various arguments that you'll discuss, and give an indication of where your essay will head in terms of what your final conclusion will be.

Do NOT answer the question in your intro; the essay needs to gather momentum and finish with a knock-out point in the conclusion, not be answered straight away.
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(Original post by Sam o0o)
Do NOT answer the question in your intro; the essay needs to gather momentum and finish with a knock-out point in the conclusion, not be answered straight away.

Not necessarily true, a good essay/article often states the author's argument in the first paragraph and then goes on to set out the evidence for that viewpoint. It immediately gives the piece structure and direction, rather than hiding the author's opinion from the reader until the last paragraph.
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Sam o0o
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(Original post by Cantab)
Not necessarily true, a good essay/article often states the author's argument in the first paragraph and then goes on to set out the evidence for that viewpoint. It immediately gives the piece structure and direction, rather than hiding the author's opinion from the reader until the last paragraph.
The audience should know the author's opinion just from what they are saying - because they should be arguing it clearly and showing why opposing arguments aren't correct - not because they simply state it in the first few sentences.
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Jessicax
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(Original post by EmmaDilemma)
Basically I need to write an introduction for this essay and I want to know how is the best way to answer a question that already has a quote in it... like for example

Why was Henry II seen as a ''courageous and strong'' king?


Like do you need to place the quote in somewhere throughout your introduction?
:woo:
You might want to find a quote from someone talking about Henry II which relates to your question or you could define what is meant to be a courageous and strong king and then say you will look at the actions, behaviour etc of Henry II to come to a conclusion whether he was or not, then start your essay.
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(Original post by Sam o0o)
The audience should know the author's opinion just from what they are saying - because they should be arguing it clearly and showing why opposing arguments aren't correct - not because they simply state it in the first few sentences.

But if they aren't allowed to 'answer the question' (ie, state their argument), how can the author's opinion come from 'what they are saying'? I'm not saying the first thing someone should say is their answer, but I find it much more helpful (and get a much better reception from supervisors) when I clearly mark out my argument at the end of the introduction.

Writing an essay in opposition to other arguments is a bit basic, you'll score much higher at university if you concentrate on your own argument, rather than stating the arguments of others and attempting to counter them (which is very A Level).
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Sam o0o
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The conclusion should be obvious to the reader because the case for it has been laid down strongly, but not explicitly.

Of course it's important to disprove other arguments, it'll help give yours more weight. Obviously all this depends on the question and what exactly it entails..
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(Original post by Sam o0o)
The conclusion should be obvious to the reader because the case for it has been laid down strongly, but not explicitly.

There is no need to beat around the bush - you should write confidently, like a published historian. You'll score no points by hiding your argument till the end, but you will score points if the essay is clearly related to your argument which should be stated at the beginning.

This is the difference between A Level and degree-level essays, you need to stop sitting on the fence, shyly waiting till the conclusion to make your argument explicit and bending to the will of other historians in the structure of your essay. Confidence and explicit argument are what university supervisors are looking for.
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Sam o0o
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(Original post by Cantab)
There is no need to beat around the bush - you should write confidently, like a published historian. You'll score no points by hiding your argument till the end, but you will score points if the essay is clearly related to your argument which should be stated at the beginning.

This is the difference between A Level and degree-level essays, you need to stop sitting on the fence, shyly waiting till the conclusion to make your argument explicit and bending to the will of other historians in the structure of your essay. Confidence and explicit argument are what university supervisors are looking for.
No, I mean laying out opposition arguments and then explaining why they are wrong - and why yours is right - throughout the essay. Not "for, against, conclusion".
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