This discussion is closed.
Smish
Badges:
#21
Report 17 years ago
#21
[q2]> > What's wrong with London?[/q2]
[q1]>[/q1]
[q1]> crime sky high property prices traffic[/q1]
[q1]>[/q1]
[q1]> there's probably more but i can't think of them right now.[/q1]
[q1]>[/q1]
[q2]> > I find it rather nice.[/q2]
[q1]>[/q1]
[q1]> yes so do I, but there are cons to living in any city.[/q1]
[q1]>[/q1]
[q2]> > The other night we went out to celebrate my friend's birthday, and the[/q2]
[q1]> club[/q1]
[q2]> > we were going to go to was closed so we went for a wander and climbed on[/q2]
[q1]> the[/q1]
[q2]> > lions at trafalgar square, and hung around the victoria monument[/q2]
opposite
[q2]> > buckingham palace. Twas great fun, and really pretty. You can't do[/q2]
that
[q1]> in[/q1]
[q2]> > other citys.[/q2]
[q1]>[/q1]
[q1]> yes but other citys have similar monuments and cool stuff to play on, have u seen picadilly[/q1]
[q1]> gardens in manchester since they have renovated it? they have these cool fountains which can[/q1]
[q1]> provide a similar level of drunken entertainment value [/q1]

yeah but the monuments and stuff in london are famous worldwide.

there's nothing quite like chilling on the steps facing buckingham palace

[q2]> > Also, they have the coolest shops in London. Regent Street is my[/q2]
[q1]> favourite.[/q1]
[q1]>[/q1]
[q1]> yeah probably, although they have the same shops in most other major[/q1]
cities.

no no no.

regent street has hamleys, the disney store, burberrys, austin reed, and ****loads of other cool and
expensive shops.

most cities have one or two of them, and rather more spread out

[q2]> > Sure it's dirty and smelly and noisy and expensive, but the occasional weekend at home provides[/q2]
[q2]> > a nice break from the first three.[/q2]
[q1]>[/q1]
[q1]> where's home anyway, i thought you were from london?[/q1]

mid sussex.

adam
0
Ray Pang
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#22
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#22
"Max Power" <[email protected] m> wrote in message
news:[email protected]...
[q1]> yes but other citys have similar monuments and cool stuff to play on, have u seen picadilly[/q1]
[q1]> gardens in manchester since they have renovated it? they have these cool fountains which can[/q1]
[q1]> provide a similar level of drunken entertainment value [/q1]

Well a comparison between Birmingham and London has to be made. Unfortunately, they're incomparable.
Cheesy as it sounds, London is a rather magical city. I've been there two or three times since being
at uni, and it never fails to impress me. Birmingham is incredibly dull in comparison on the other
hand. No red buses, no underground (decent trains though), no Oxford street. And it's only 15 miles
from Coventry, which is also a major negative.
0
Max Power
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#23
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#23
[q2]> > yes but other citys have similar monuments and cool stuff to play on, have u seen picadilly[/q2]
[q2]> > gardens in manchester since they have renovated[/q2]
it?
[q2]> > they have these cool fountains which can provide a similar level of drunken entertainment[/q2]
[q2]> > value [/q2]
[q1]>[/q1]
[q1]> yeah but the monuments and stuff in london are famous worldwide.[/q1]
[q1]>[/q1]
[q1]> there's nothing quite like chilling on the steps facing buckingham palace[/q1]
[q1][/q1]

yeah sure, I'm not knocking it, just saying that well there's similar cool (maybe slightly less
famous stuff) in manchester to play on that's all. at umist we have the statue of archimedes to
decorate after a night out, which is fairly famous in some circles :-)

[q3]> > > Also, they have the coolest shops in London. Regent Street is my[/q3]
[q2]> > favourite.[/q2]
[q2]> >[/q2]
[q2]> > yeah probably, although they have the same shops in most other major[/q2]
[q1]> cities.[/q1]
[q1]>[/q1]
[q1]> no no no.[/q1]
[q1]>[/q1]
[q1]> regent street has hamleys,[/q1]

sure, but they do make some stupid claims about having every single toy ever made.

[q1]> the disney store,[/q1]

got that in manchester, not quite sure how that comes under cool shops though, it's not
really my thing

[q1]> burberrys, austin reed, and ****loads of other cool and expensive shops.[/q1]

never heard of either of them two, but there are plenty of expensive shops in manchester too, but
then again, what good is expensive when you are a poor student anyway? the trafford centre in
manchester has pretty much every shop under the sun, takes about 10mins just to walk through it,
that's plenty for me.
0
Smish
Badges:
#24
Report 17 years ago
#24
[q3]> > > > Also, they have the coolest shops in London. Regent Street is my[/q3]
[q3]> > > favourite.[/q3]
[q3]> > >[/q3]
[q3]> > > yeah probably, although they have the same shops in most other major[/q3]
[q2]> > cities.[/q2]
[q2]> >[/q2]
[q2]> > no no no.[/q2]
[q2]> >[/q2]
[q2]> > regent street has hamleys,[/q2]
[q1]>[/q1]
[q1]> sure, but they do make some stupid claims about having every single toy[/q1]
ever
[q1]> made.[/q1]
[q1]>[/q1]
[q2]> > the disney store,[/q2]
[q1]>[/q1]
[q1]> got that in manchester, not quite sure how that comes under cool shops though, it's not really[/q1]
[q1]> my thing[/q1]
[q1]>[/q1]
[q2]> > burberrys, austin reed, and ****loads of other cool and expensive shops.[/q2]
[q1]>[/q1]
[q1]> never heard of either of them two, but there are plenty of expensive shops in manchester too, but[/q1]
[q1]> then again, what good is expensive when you are a poor student anyway? the trafford centre in[/q1]
[q1]> manchester has pretty much every shop under the[/q1]
sun,
[q1]> takes about 10mins just to walk through it, that's plenty for me.[/q1]

the whole regent street experience is really rather cool.

the shops sell really really nice expensive things, which i can day dream about buying someday. it's
not like your average shopping center or high street.

adam
0
Matthew M. Hunt
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#25
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#25
JHP ([email protected] t.co.uk) wrote:

[q1]> First, the press of people. Second the moral ugliness of the people and in particular the selfish[/q1]
[q1]> search for money.[/q1]

Not all Londoners are like that. There are vast numbers of us who work for public services.

[q1]> Third the ubiquity of it all. There is nowhere you can go to escape the small-mindedness of it and[/q1]
[q1]> in particular the parochialism of Londoners en masse. They refer to every one else as being[/q1]
[q1]> provincial, but they are the most parochial.[/q1]

Many of us came to London precisely because of the stifling small-mindedness of wherever it was we
originated.

[q1]> Quote from Londoner hearing my friend, who has a slight Lancashire accent. "'Ere, you're from up[/q1]
[q1]> norf, intcha? Darn 'ere we fink everyone from up norf is fick."[/q1]

And aren't there plenty of places up north where opening your mouth and speaking with a southern
accent will get you abuse along the normal lines of "shandy-drinking southern pooftah"?

Matthew Huntbach
0
Matthew M. Hunt
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#26
Report 17 years ago
#26
smish ([email protected]) wrote:

[q2]> > yes but other citys have similar monuments and cool stuff to play on, have u seen picadilly[/q2]
[q2]> > gardens in manchester since they have renovated it? they have these cool fountains which can[/q2]
[q2]> > provide a similar level of drunken entertainment value [/q2]

[q1]> yeah but the monuments and stuff in london are famous worldwide.[/q1]

[q1]> there's nothing quite like chilling on the steps facing buckingham palace [/q1]

Once you start living in London, as opposed to staying there in student accommodation in parts of
central London you'd never be able to afford to live in on a normal salary, life starts looking a
little different.

You don't see much of the touristy bits, except those bits you pass every day on your way to work.
Going shopping in the West End gets to be a real pain, and you find it's much more convenient to go
to whichever of the big suburban shopping centres is nearest to you - Bromley is mine - you can get
just the same things, it's cleaner, there's car parking etc. You find out that the real London which
most Londoners experience is much more centred around the suburb where they live than the central
parts that people outside London are familiar with.

Matthew Huntbach
0
Richard Magrath
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#27
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#27
"JHP" <[email protected] t.co.uk> wrote in message
news:<[email protected]>...

I have to say, I'm quite interested in the outcome of this thread as I'm currently debating whether
or not to apply to University College London...

[q1]> I can only speak for myself. Firstly I find all cities difficult and it must be said that London[/q1]
[q1]> is the epitome of a city in that everything I hate about them is amplified there.[/q1]
[q1]>[/q1]
[q1]> First, the press of people.[/q1]

I don't know whether I'd like that or not.

[q1]> Second the moral ugliness of the people and in particular the selfish search for money.[/q1]

But surely you find this everywhere, or at least expect to find it everywhere.

[q1]> Third the ubiquity of it all. There is nowhere you can go to escape the small-mindedness of it and[/q1]
[q1]> in particular the parochialism of Londoners en masse. They refer to every one else as being[/q1]
[q1]> provincial, but they are the most parochial.[/q1]

Did you have Jade from Big Brother in mind here, John? :-)

It's charming in a sad way. Glaswegians (to take one odd
[q1]> example) are fully aware of the place of their city in the world and have respect for other cities[/q1]
[q1]> an indeed for other places, but few Londoners. Fourth, the noise and interminability of it. I once[/q1]
[q1]> stayed at the London Business School on a room over a busty road.[/q1]

Mmm... busty road...

T traffic stopped at 2:30 and
[q1]> started at 5:00. I just don;t wan that.[/q1]

I'd have to agree with you, doesn't sound appealing to me either.

[q1]> Fifth, the ethnocentricity. If it isn't darn sarf it's quaint and old fashioned.[/q1]

Scary thing is, the government seems to think that too... the second general studies GCSE paper was
about the distribution of funding for the arts across Britain, and scarily enough, Northern Ireland
and Northern England *combined* received about one tenth of the money that the Royal Opera House
alone receive from the government annually.

Well actually, no. In many cases it's a SE based policy that is
[q1]> old fashioned and reactionary. It's a kind of racism. I've had and heard more gratuitous insults,[/q1]
[q1]> for example, for being Welsh[/q1]

I didn't know you were Welsh! I'm a great fan of Wales myself - John Cale, Richard Burton, the Super
Furry Animals - I'm even doing How Green Was My Valley as my English Lit book.

No real reason for me to write all this, but I'm impressed! :-)

On another note, my neighbor (a real cockernee geeza) came round to our house a couple of nights
ago, and he and my parents were talking and mentioned that I was applying to Edinburgh and was (at
the time) considering a couple of other Scottish unis.

"You can't go to Scotland," he said, deadly seriously, "they *hate* the English up there. I've known
Scots who wouldn't even set foot in this country, they despise it so much. A friend of mine from
Scotland has the national anthem as his mobile ring-tone. They won't serve you in any of the pubs or
anything. They just hate the English so much."

Hmm...

from Londoners than
[q1]> any other group of people. Quote from a business man I took to dinner in Lancashire "this is[/q1]
[q1]> amazing, I never realised you had restaurants like this up here." Quote from Londoner hearing my[/q1]
[q1]> friend, who has a slight Lancashire accent. "'Ere, you're from up norf, intcha? Darn 'ere we fink[/q1]
[q1]> everyone from up norf is fick."[/q1]

Living as I do between Manchester and Liverpool, there's a good mix of accents at my school
(Manc/Scouse/Lancashire/Welsh) and a bit of friendly ribbing that goes with it (reinforced by the
irony that, outside the NW, everyone things we're all Mancunian anyway) though I see that you're
talking about something more serious here. I think I've always accepted that going to university in
the Deep South is almost like going as a foreign student (really!). I'd be quite proud of being
different, myself, especially if I came from somewhere I knew was seen as being cool. In the case of
the Londoner and your friend, I think it was probably clear who was really the fick 'un...

Admittedly, I've never had someone say something like that to my face though.

[q1]>[/q1]
[q1]> I understand that many people like it but for me if someone is satisfied with London he is tired[/q1]
[q1]> of life.[/q1]

Well, it's only for three years at least. And then I can do my PhD in Barbados.

[q1]>[/q1]
[q1]> Sorry. :>)[/q1]
[q1]>[/q1]
[q1]> John[/q1]

Well, I'll just take me whippet for a walk, shine me clogs and tuck into some lovely Lancashire
hot pot. ;-)

Rich
0
Jhp
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#28
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#28
[q1]> and I think you will also find in most cases that ppl gratutituously[/q1]
insult
[q1]> londoners as much as londoners insult them.[/q1]
[q1]>[/q1]
[q2]> > I understand that many people like it but for me if someone is satisfied with London he is tired[/q2]
[q2]> > of life.[/q2]
[q1]>[/q1]
[q1]> i don't know, the main thing that annoys me about london is how it has become prohibitively[/q1]
[q1]> expensive in recent years, london is one of the most[/q1]
liveliest
[q1]> places in england to live.[/q1]
[q1]>[/q1]
[q1]>[/q1]
I fully understand other people liking London. I just don't. It's mainly a city thing. John
0
Jhp
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#29
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#29
[q2]> > First, the press of people. Second the moral ugliness of the people and in particular the[/q2]
[q2]> > selfish search for money.[/q2]
[q1]>[/q1]
[q1]> Not all Londoners are like that. There are vast numbers of us who work for public services.[/q1]

Of course, but there are an awful lot of highly instrumntal people in most cities. It's one of the
main reasans to move to London - the salaries for some jobs are significantly higher. And don't
those people let you know it!
[q1]>[/q1]
[q2]> > Third the ubiquity of it all. There is nowhere you can go to escape the small-mindedness of it[/q2]
[q2]> > and in particular the parochialism of Londoners[/q2]
en
[q2]> > masse. They refer to every one else as being provincial, but they are[/q2]
the
[q2]> > most parochial.[/q2]
[q1]>[/q1]
[q1]> Many of us came to London precisely because of the stifling[/q1]
small-mindedness
[q1]> of wherever it was we originated.[/q1]
[q1]>[/q1]
[q2]> > Quote from Londoner hearing my friend, who has a slight Lancashire accent. "'Ere, you're from[/q2]
[q2]> > up norf, intcha? Darn 'ere we fink everyone from up norf is fick."[/q2]
[q1]>[/q1]
[q1]> And aren't there plenty of places up north where opening your mouth and speaking with a southern[/q1]
[q1]> accent will get you abuse along the normal lines of "shandy-drinking southern pooftah"?[/q1]

Sure. I never said anywhere was perfect.
[q1]>[/q1]
[q1]> Matthew Huntbach[/q1]

As I said elsewhere, it's mainly a city thing.

John
0
Richard Magrath
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#30
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#30
[email protected] (Matthew M. Huntbach) wrote in message news:<[email protected] uk>...

[q2]> > Quote from Londoner hearing my friend, who has a slight Lancashire accent. "'Ere, you're from[/q2]
[q2]> > up norf, intcha? Darn 'ere we fink everyone from up norf is fick."[/q2]
[q1]>[/q1]
[q1]> And aren't there plenty of places up north where opening your mouth and speaking with a southern[/q1]
[q1]> accent will get you abuse along the normal lines of "shandy-drinking southern pooftah"?[/q1]
[q1]>[/q1]

It's more of a class thing though, isn't it? Presumably a cockney (my next door neighbor comes to
mind) wouldn't get that sort of reaction. I think it's because, Tony Wilson and his weird voice
aside, Northern accents are seen as working class because people who make money will either (a) move
down South and their children will grow up posh or (b) read articles in the Economist about how
no-one takes regional accents seriously, and will have elocution lessons ("cuppa tea" "cup *of*
tea!", etc, etc, (c) GB Shaw).

Rich
0
Chris Share
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#31
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#31
On 24 Jun 2002 14:07:23 -0700s, Richard Magrath([email protected]) said...
[q1]>"JHP" <[email protected] t.co.uk> wrote in message[/q1]
[q1]>news:<[email protected]>...[/q1]
[q1]>[/q1]
[q1]>I have to say, I'm quite interested in the outcome of this thread as I'm currently debating whether[/q1]
[q1]>or not to apply to University College London...[/q1]
[q1]>[/q1]
[q2]>> I can only speak for myself. Firstly I find all cities difficult and it must be said that London[/q2]
[q2]>> is the epitome of a city in that everything I hate about them is amplified there.[/q2]
[q2]>>[/q2]
[q2]>> First, the press of people.[/q2]
[q1]>[/q1]
[q1]>I don't know whether I'd like that or not.[/q1]
[q1]>[/q1]
[q2]>> Second the moral ugliness of the people and in particular the selfish search for money.[/q2]
[q1]>[/q1]
[q1]>But surely you find this everywhere, or at least expect to find it everywhere.[/q1]
[q1]>[/q1]
[q2]>> Third the ubiquity of it all. There is nowhere you can go to escape the small-mindedness of it[/q2]
[q2]>> and in particular the parochialism of Londoners en masse. They refer to every one else as being[/q2]
[q2]>> provincial, but they are the most parochial.[/q2]
[q1]>[/q1]
[q1]>Did you have Jade from Big Brother in mind here, John? :-)[/q1]
[q1]>[/q1]
[q1]> It's charming in a sad way. Glaswegians (to take one odd[/q1]
[q2]>> example) are fully aware of the place of their city in the world and have respect for other[/q2]
[q2]>> cities an indeed for other places, but few Londoners. Fourth, the noise and interminability of[/q2]
[q2]>> it. I once stayed at the London Business School on a room over a busty road.[/q2]
[q1]>[/q1]
[q1]>Mmm... busty road...[/q1]
[q1]>[/q1]
[q1]> T traffic stopped at 2:30 and[/q1]
[q2]>> started at 5:00. I just don;t wan that.[/q2]
[q1]>[/q1]
[q1]>I'd have to agree with you, doesn't sound appealing to me either.[/q1]
[q1]>[/q1]
[q2]>> Fifth, the ethnocentricity. If it isn't darn sarf it's quaint and old fashioned.[/q2]
[q1]>[/q1]
[q1]>Scary thing is, the government seems to think that too... the second general studies GCSE paper was[/q1]
[q1]>about the distribution of funding for the arts across Britain, and scarily enough, Northern Ireland[/q1]
[q1]>and Northern England *combined* received about one tenth of the money that the Royal Opera House[/q1]
[q1]>alone receive from the government annually.[/q1]
[q1]>[/q1]
[q1]>Well actually, no. In many cases it's a SE based policy that is[/q1]
[q2]>> old fashioned and reactionary. It's a kind of racism. I've had and heard more gratuitous insults,[/q2]
[q2]>> for example, for being Welsh[/q2]
[q1]>[/q1]
[q1]>I didn't know you were Welsh! I'm a great fan of Wales myself - John Cale, Richard Burton, the[/q1]
[q1]>Super Furry Animals - I'm even doing How Green Was My Valley as my English Lit book.[/q1]
[q1]>[/q1]
[q1]>No real reason for me to write all this, but I'm impressed! :-)[/q1]
[q1]>[/q1]
[q1]>On another note, my neighbor (a real cockernee geeza) came round to our house a couple of nights[/q1]
[q1]>ago, and he and my parents were talking and mentioned that I was applying to Edinburgh and was (at[/q1]
[q1]>the time) considering a couple of other Scottish unis.[/q1]
[q1]>[/q1]
[q1]>"You can't go to Scotland," he said, deadly seriously, "they *hate* the English up there. I've[/q1]
[q1]>known Scots who wouldn't even set foot in this country, they despise it so much. A friend of mine[/q1]
[q1]>from Scotland has the national anthem as his mobile ring-tone. They won't serve you in any of the[/q1]
[q1]>pubs or anything. They just hate the English so much."[/q1]
[q1]>[/q1]
[q1]>Hmm...[/q1]
[q1]>[/q1]
[q1]> from Londoners than[/q1]
[q2]>> any other group of people. Quote from a business man I took to dinner in Lancashire "this is[/q2]
[q2]>> amazing, I never realised you had restaurants like this up here." Quote from Londoner hearing my[/q2]
[q2]>> friend, who has a slight Lancashire accent. "'Ere, you're from up norf, intcha? Darn 'ere we fink[/q2]
[q2]>> everyone from up norf is fick."[/q2]

Lol. You'd have to be a bit "fick" (me just mistyped it with a U) to think anyone's stupid just cos
of thye accent here - it's quite funny, hearing the chemistry demonstrator with a thick Yorkshire
accent tho

[q1]>Living as I do between Manchester and Liverpool, there's a good mix of accents at my school[/q1]
[q1]>(Manc/Scouse/Lancashire/Welsh)[/q1]

Hey, that sounds vaguely near me - where are you? I'm about 5 miles from the centre of Stoke...

and a bit of
[q1]>friendly ribbing that goes with it (reinforced by the irony that, outside the NW, everyone things[/q1]
[q1]>we're all Mancunian anyway) though I see that you're talking about something more serious here. I[/q1]
[q1]>think I've always accepted that going to university in the Deep South is almost like going as a[/q1]
[q1]>foreign student (really!). I'd be quite proud of being different, myself, especially if I came from[/q1]
[q1]>somewhere I knew was seen as being cool. In the case of the Londoner and your friend, I think it[/q1]
[q1]>was probably clear who was really the fick 'un...[/q1]

Hehe. I sound completely accentless to myself, but listening on computer etc I sound like a complete
idiot On a scale of 1-10 my moronicity is about 13...

[q1]>Admittedly, I've never had someone say something like that to my face though.[/q1]
[q1]>[/q1]
[q2]>>[/q2]
[q2]>> I understand that many people like it but for me if someone is satisfied with London he is tired[/q2]
[q2]>> of life.[/q2]
[q1]>[/q1]
[q1]>Well, it's only for three years at least. And then I can do my PhD in Barbados.[/q1]

Lol! My PhD will be here, unless I've got so pissed of with education by then... which given this
year's 2:2, is not that unlikely.

[q2]>> Sorry. :>)[/q2]
[q2]>>[/q2]
[q2]>> John[/q2]
[q1]>[/q1]
[q1]>Well, I'll just take me whippet for a walk, shine me clogs and tuck into some lovely Lancashire[/q1]
[q1]>hot pot. ;-)[/q1]
[q1]>[/q1]
[q1]>Rich[/q1]

Clogs? Yeek, you sound like my mother Hot pot's icky tho, mmm oatcakes Staffordshire
delicacy :-D

chris
0
Smish
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#32
Report 17 years ago
#32
[q1]> T traffic stopped at 2:30 and[/q1]
[q2]> > started at 5:00. I just don;t wan that.[/q2]
[q1]>[/q1]
[q1]> I'd have to agree with you, doesn't sound appealing to me either.[/q1]

I was in a ground floor room next to a very busy road, but it didn't bother me too much, tho I sleep
fairly heavily I guess.

[q2]> > Fifth, the ethnocentricity. If it isn't darn sarf it's quaint and old fashioned.[/q2]
[q1]>[/q1]
[q1]> Scary thing is, the government seems to think that too... the second general studies GCSE paper[/q1]
[q1]> was about the distribution of funding for the arts across Britain, and scarily enough, Northern[/q1]
[q1]> Ireland and Northern England *combined* received about one tenth of the money that the Royal Opera[/q1]
[q1]> House alone receive from the government annually.[/q1]
[q1]>[/q1]
[q1]> Well actually, no. In many cases it's a SE based policy that is[/q1]
[q2]> > old fashioned and reactionary. It's a kind of racism. I've had and heard more gratuitous[/q2]
[q2]> > insults, for example, for being Welsh[/q2]
[q1]>[/q1]
[q1]> I didn't know you were Welsh! I'm a great fan of Wales myself - John Cale, Richard Burton, the[/q1]
[q1]> Super Furry Animals - I'm even doing How Green Was My Valley as my English Lit book.[/q1]
[q1]>[/q1]
[q1]> No real reason for me to write all this, but I'm impressed! :-)[/q1]
[q1]>[/q1]
[q1]> On another note, my neighbor (a real cockernee geeza) came round to our house a couple of nights[/q1]
[q1]> ago, and he and my parents were talking and mentioned that I was applying to Edinburgh and was (at[/q1]
[q1]> the time) considering a couple of other Scottish unis.[/q1]
[q1]>[/q1]
[q1]> "You can't go to Scotland," he said, deadly seriously, "they *hate* the English up there. I've[/q1]
[q1]> known Scots who wouldn't even set foot in this country, they despise it so much. A friend of mine[/q1]
[q1]> from Scotland has the national anthem as his mobile ring-tone. They won't serve you in any of the[/q1]
[q1]> pubs or anything. They just hate the English so much."[/q1]
[q1]>[/q1]
[q1]> Hmm...[/q1]
[q1]>[/q1]
[q1]> from Londoners than[/q1]
[q2]> > any other group of people. Quote from a business man I took to dinner in Lancashire "this is[/q2]
[q2]> > amazing, I never realised you had restaurants like[/q2]
this
[q2]> > up here." Quote from Londoner hearing my friend, who has a slight Lancashire accent. "'Ere,[/q2]
[q2]> > you're from up norf, intcha? Darn 'ere we fink everyone from up norf is fick."[/q2]
[q1]>[/q1]
[q1]> Living as I do between Manchester and Liverpool, there's a good mix of accents at my school[/q1]
[q1]> (Manc/Scouse/Lancashire/Welsh) and a bit of friendly ribbing that goes with it (reinforced by the[/q1]
[q1]> irony that, outside the NW, everyone things we're all Mancunian anyway) though I see that you're[/q1]
[q1]> talking about something more serious here. I think I've always accepted that going to university[/q1]
[q1]> in the Deep South is almost like going as a foreign student (really!). I'd be quite proud of being[/q1]
[q1]> different, myself, especially if I came from somewhere I knew was seen as being cool. In the case[/q1]
[q1]> of the Londoner and your friend, I think it was probably clear who was really the fick 'un...[/q1]
[q1]>[/q1]
[q1]> Admittedly, I've never had someone say something like that to my face though.[/q1]

Most of the people I met in halls were not from around here i.e. they had strong accents from
scotland, wales, and north england. Only a couple came from London and the south east.

So maybe you will feel a bit like a forigner, but so will everyone else, including southerners

Dunno what it's like at other London unis though.

adam
0
Gigi Tsui
Badges:
#33
Report 17 years ago
#33
In article <[email protected] sting.google.com>, [email protected] says...
[q1]> "JHP" <[email protected] t.co.uk> wrote in message[/q1]
[q1]> news:<[email protected]>...[/q1]
[q1]>[/q1]
[q1]> On another note, my neighbor (a real cockernee geeza) came round to our house a couple of nights[/q1]
[q1]> ago, and he and my parents were talking and mentioned that I was applying to Edinburgh and was (at[/q1]
[q1]> the time) considering a couple of other Scottish unis.[/q1]
[q1]>[/q1]
[q1]> "You can't go to Scotland," he said, deadly seriously, "they *hate* the English up there. I've[/q1]
[q1]> known Scots who wouldn't even set foot in this country, they despise it so much. A friend of mine[/q1]
[q1]> from Scotland has the national anthem as his mobile ring-tone. They won't serve you in any of the[/q1]
[q1]> pubs or anything. They just hate the English so much."[/q1]
[q1]>[/q1]

I was in a (kinda) similar situation last year when I was applying to UCAS. I was the only person in
(a Scottish) school who applied to English unis, and the others were like "What? You're applying to
England? Why? Why do you want to go down south?" And when they knew that I applied to London;
comments include "You're applying to England and London?!? London is a horrible place and dirty.
Don't go there" and "Stay in Scotland, it's miles better!" So it wasn't very encouraging - and these
comments were from teachers (apart from one, who's English) as well as pupils. Interestingly, a
number of pupils didn't want to go to Edinburgh uni because it's "full of snobbish/English/public
school people."

Good Tea
0
Matthew M. Hunt
Badges:
#34
Report 17 years ago
#34
Richard Magrath ([email protected]) wrote:
[q1]> "JHP" <[email protected] t.co.uk> wrote in message news:[/q1]

[q2]> > I understand that many people like it but for me if someone is satisfied with London he is tired[/q2]
[q2]> > of life.[/q2]

[q1]> Well, it's only for three years at least. And then I can do my PhD in Barbados.[/q1]

http://www.uwichill.edu.bb/

Matthew Huntbach
0
Matthew M. Hunt
Badges:
#35
Report 17 years ago
#35
Richard Magrath ([email protected]) wrote:
[q1]> [email protected] (Matthew M. Huntbach) wrote in message news:[/q1]

[q2]> > And aren't there plenty of places up north where opening your mouth and speaking with a southern[/q2]
[q2]> > accent will get you abuse along the normal lines of "shandy-drinking southern pooftah"?[/q2]

[q1]> It's more of a class thing though, isn't it? Presumably a cockney (my next door neighbor comes to[/q1]
[q1]> mind) wouldn't get that sort of reaction.[/q1]

A cockney would get exactly the same sort of reaction.

[q1]> I think it's because, Tony Wilson and his weird voice aside, Northern accents are seen as[/q1]
[q1]> working class[/q1]

When I was young, northern accents were mainly heard from teachers and other authority figures,
who'd moved down south. Thus I always saw them as middle class.

Matthew Huntbach
0
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