snoopyx
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Natasha_BBY
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#2
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regardless of career, the usefulness for such a high demand degree will still be high! especially if its from LSE or somewhere!
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farhaz_j
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it'll never be seen as a bad degree by employers..it's a matter of the job you're looking at, what university, the grade and (to some employers) the type (ba/bsc etc)
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Priscilla J
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Of course an Economics degree is highly respectable, when you graduate, the economic climate will probabaly be better then and firms will have a high demand for people. As a graduate, with experience in the worsened economic climate, and perhaps good work experience, innovative and creative iddeas, you will be exactly what the firms want, therefore i would say that it is a good idea to pursue a career in economics.
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bavink
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stfu lol
no
in 5 years you will be rolling in jobs mate
quote me on that
i guarantee it
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gooseymcgoose
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Economics is not banking. They are really very different things. If you were to be a professional economist as it were, then your insight is equally if not more valid during the rough times, as a policy maker you're the one expected to create policy that turns things around.

But most econ graduates don't go on to use their knowledge of economics, they go on to be investment bankers, management consultants, accountants. Those jobs are affected right now, and it's reasonable to ask if you should be thinking about doing something else, but it's worth remembering that they think no more of an economics degree than a physics degree or a maths degree, because what those companies do is not economics.

(i'm posting as somebody who graduated in economics btw)
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shivan_cfc
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(Original post by gooseymcgoose)
Economics is not banking. They are really very different things. If you were to be a professional economist as it were, then your insight is equally if not more valid during the rough times, as a policy maker you're the one expected to create policy that turns things around.

But most economists don't go on to use their knowledge of economics, they go on to be investment bankers, management consultants, accountants. Those jobs are affected right now, and it's reasonable to ask if you should be thinking about doing something else, but it's worth remembering that they think no more of an economics degree than a physics degree or a maths degree, because what those companies do is not economics.

(i'm posting as somebody who graduated in economics btw)
So what are the advantages of doing an Economics degree?
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shivan_cfc
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Tbh i'm gna find it a real struggle if Economics is a finished sector when I graduate (which is about 5/6 years still) because i don't think i'm interested in much else
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thetopnotch
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5 years and we could be out of this current reccesion, job loss etc. Based on past recessions we've gone into this one fast according to Economists, so we may come out fast. in 5 years it may have picked up and Economics does open up a lot of doors for you.
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gooseymcgoose
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(Original post by shivan_cfc)
So what are the advantages of doing an Economics degree?
you can be an economist (i.e. somebody who does social policy, or somebody who advises private institutions on economic matters)

otherwise it has no advantage over being a physicist or a mathematician - it's just another well respected degree.

so go ahead, do it, it's a very interesting degree!
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gooseymcgoose
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#11
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(Original post by shivan_cfc)
Tbh i'm gna find it a real struggle if Economics is a finished sector when I graduate (which is about 5/6 years still) because i don't think i'm interested in much else
Guys - seriously - there's not an economics sector! the vast majority of economists are employed by the national/international government or universities. As employers, they are unaffected by the recession.
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Teveth
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(Original post by Feral Beast)
They are quite versatile degrees, especially if you choose a quantitative one.

They involve essay writing, solving, research, a whole bunch of useful stuff.

They are very useful. I would say yes, but of course, nowadays you'd need to go to a good university.
Oh for god's sake.

Why must the top university brigade take over every single thread on this forum?
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mollymustard
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#13
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(Original post by Teveth)
Oh for god's sake.

Why must the top university brigade take over every single thread on this forum?
Probably because it does matter to some extent. Job prospects for someone doing Economics at LSE to those of someone with the same degree at UEL are very different.
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invictus_veritas
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it's always a bad time to do an economics degree. They're so hard and the maths is difficult.

However if you can cope with the workload and come out with a good degree then an economics degree is one of the best you can do. You get to show you have mathematical skills, analytical ones and many others. You get to show you can do virtually everything you can do with other degrees such as those in history/ geography and many arts subjects, but more because you have strong quantative skills too. So no don't go for something like English literature instead due to the current economic climate.

Anyway by the time you graduate the recession will be over and you will be one of those people who gets to take advantage of the opportunities emerging from a reformed financial system!
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abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz
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(Original post by Priscilla J)
Of course an Economics degree is highly respectable, when you graduate, the economic climate will probabaly be better then and firms will have a high demand for people. As a graduate, with experience in the worsened economic climate, and perhaps good work experience, innovative and creative iddeas, you will be exactly what the firms want, therefore i would say that it is a good idea to pursue a career in economics.
what experience? you don't have any experience at all
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thetopnotch
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#16
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(Original post by abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz)
what experience? you don't have any experience at all
i think she meant, that when you leave uni as a graduate, with experience in the worsened climate, and perhaps good work experience.... as the rest of her post
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Jaquafresh
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(Original post by shivan_cfc)
Tbh i'm gna find it a real struggle if Economics is a finished sector when I graduate (which is about 5/6 years still) because i don't think i'm interested in much else
Are you sure you are even smart enough to get an economics degree with a statement like that?
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snoopyx
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#18
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Would taking a gap year to teach English in Japan weaken or strengthen my application to top unis such as LSE and Warwick?? I'm considering doing this and also taking Further Maths and Economics A2 during my gap year
Would this be a good idea?
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Paulwhy
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(Original post by snoopyx)
In the current economic situation, would it be unwise to pursue a career in economics? Are the amount of jobs for economics graduates decreasing and are salaries being affected.. will this continue to happen in the next 5 years?
Should I consider doing something like English Literature instead??
I am not sure I understand your thinking here: why would the current economic climate lead to other subjects (e.g. English Literature) being more valued relative to economics?
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.ACS.
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#20
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It's never a good or a bad time to do any degree, really.

Sure, a lot of economics graduates go into banking, or accounting, or management consultancy, or finance of some sort, however there are plenty of other options including becoming a professional economist and also even doing a law conversion course.

The good thing about a degree in economics is that it is both quantitative and qualitative. In other words, you'll have a good grasp of mathematics and statistics, while you'll also be able to write essays well and conduct research. If you go to a good university and come out with a good degree and lots of 'extras' (i.e.: experience, soft-skills, leadership skills, etc. etc.), then you should be well placed.
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