Toilet training Watch

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Sarah
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#1
Report 16 years ago
#1
We have a child who is due to start school part time Sept, full time January. Arabic is his 1st
language, but he actually has no speech whatsoever. He is also nowhere near being toilet trained.
The ed psych is very worried about him, and a statement is in the process of being prepared. As yet,
we do not know how many LSA hours will be on this although I feel it should be full support cover.

Any thought on this? I would be interested to hear of similar experiences, and how people dealt with
them. I will be the SENCO when he starts, so obviously it will be my responsibility to oversee his
admission etc.

--
Sarah
Jacquie Long
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When you say he has no speech does that mean that he doesn't speak in his first language or
in English?

[q1]>[/q1]
[q1]>[/q1]

--
Jacquie Long
Benmax
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#3
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I wouldn't have thought that the school would take him if he wasn't toilet trained. A friend of mine
teaches in a nursery class attached to a school, and it's one of the criteria for getting a place. I
know this is not statutory provision, but they apply the same rule for Reception. Having said that,
if there is a medical reason for the child's incontinence, then support should be given for his
physical needs. nan

"Sarah" <[email protected] o.uk> wrote in message
news:[email protected]...
[q1]> We have a child who is due to start school part time Sept, full time January. Arabic is his 1st[/q1]
[q1]> language, but he actually has no speech whatsoever. He is also nowhere near being toilet trained.[/q1]
[q1]> The ed psych is very worried about him, and a statement is in the process of being[/q1]
prepared.
[q1]> As yet, we do not know how many LSA hours will be on this although I feel[/q1]
it
[q1]> should be full support cover.[/q1]
[q1]>[/q1]
[q1]> Any thought on this? I would be interested to hear of similar experiences, and how people dealt[/q1]
[q1]> with them. I will be the SENCO when he starts, so obviously it will be my responsibility to[/q1]
[q1]> oversee his admission etc.[/q1]
[q1]>[/q1]
[q1]> --[/q1]
[q1]> Sarah[/q1]
Sheila :-D
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#4
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#4
"benmax" <[email protected]> burbled:

[q1]>I wouldn't have thought that the school would take him if he wasn't toilet trained. A friend of[/q1]
[q1]>mine teaches in a nursery class attached to a school, and it's one of the criteria for getting a[/q1]
[q1]>place. I know this is not statutory provision, but they apply the same rule for Reception. Having[/q1]
[q1]>said that, if there is a medical reason for the child's incontinence, then support should be given[/q1]
[q1]>for his physical needs.[/q1]

With the new disability act, it's illegal not to take a child for that reason, from Sept.
--
Sheila :-D (Remove e to mail.)
Shaz
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"SLieber24" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]...
[q1]> In article <61hehuk9g6fg440h9uprlv147tk1p3m [email protected]>, "Sheila :-D" <[email protected]> writes:[/q1]
[q1]>[/q1]
[q2]> >>I wouldn't have thought that the school would take him if he wasn't[/q2]
toilet
[q2]> >>trained. A friend of mine teaches in a nursery class attached to a[/q2]
school,
[q2]> >>and it's one of the criteria for getting a place. I know this is not statutory provision, but[/q2]
[q2]> >>they apply the same rule for Reception. Having said that, if there is a medical reason for the[/q2]
[q2]> >>child's incontinence,[/q2]
then
[q2]> >>support should be given for his physical needs.[/q2]
[q2]> >[/q2]
[q2]> >With the new disability act, it's illegal not to take a child for that reason, from Sept.[/q2]
[q2]> >--[/q2]
[q1]>[/q1]
[q1]> A normally developed child who is not toilet trained does not fall under[/q1]
the
[q1]> heading of "disability." Still, support must be given, for health reasons.[/q1]
[q1]>[/q1]
[q1]> ----------------------------------------------------[/q1]
[q1]> Sandi[/q1]
[q1]>[/q1]
[q1]> Remove NoSpam to reply.[/q1]

I know it's not quite the same but I teach 3 and 4 years olds in a Nursery attached to an Infant
school in a deprived area. We take children who are not toilet trained and find that having other
children to take note of they are soon using the loo, cos they want to be the same as them. If we
didn't take them in they would still be untrained when starting reception. Also we have children who
have no language mainly because their parents do not talk to them and again they learn a lot just by
being with the other children. We have an LSA who works with a maximum of 5 children out of a group
of 26. Also a Nursery nurse and a general assistant. Hope this helps.

---
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Sheila :-D
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[email protected] (SLieber24) burbled:

[q1]>A normally developed child who is not toilet trained does not fall under the heading of[/q1]
[q1]>"disability."[/q1]

It's not normal though.
--
Sheila :-D (Remove e to mail.)
Sarah
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[q1]>With the new disability act, it's illegal not to take a child for that reason, from Sept.[/q1]

Yes, this is what I thought. We hadn't actually even thought about not taking the child, I was just
wondering how others had dealt with a similar situation( apart from changing, obviously!). I don't
think it's a physical handicap, more a late development.

He has no language at all, Arabic or other.
--
Sarah Sheila :-D <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]...
[q1]> "benmax" <[email protected]> burbled:[/q1]
[q1]>[/q1]
[q2]> >I wouldn't have thought that the school would take him if he wasn't[/q2]
toilet
[q2]> >trained. A friend of mine teaches in a nursery class attached to a[/q2]
school,
[q2]> >and it's one of the criteria for getting a place. I know this is not statutory provision, but[/q2]
[q2]> >they apply the same rule for Reception. Having said that, if there is a medical reason for the[/q2]
[q2]> >child's incontinence,[/q2]
then
[q2]> >support should be given for his physical needs.[/q2]
[q1]>[/q1]
[q1]> With the new disability act, it's illegal not to take a child for that reason, from Sept.[/q1]
[q1]> --[/q1]
[q1]> Sheila :-D (Remove e to mail.)[/q1]
John Griffiths
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#8
Report 16 years ago
#8
"Shaz" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
[q1]>[/q1]
[q1]> "SLieber24" <[email protected]> wrote in message[/q1]
[q1]> news:[email protected]...[/q1]
[q2]> > In article <61hehuk9g6fg440h9uprlv147tk1p3m [email protected]>, "Sheila :-D" <[email protected]>[/q2]
[q2]> > writes:[/q2]
[q2]> >[/q2]
[q3]> > >>I wouldn't have thought that the school would take him if he wasn't[/q3]
[q1]> toilet[/q1]
[q3]> > >>trained. A friend of mine teaches in a nursery class attached to a[/q3]
[q1]> school,[/q1]
[q3]> > >>and it's one of the criteria for getting a place. I know this is not statutory provision, but[/q3]
[q3]> > >>they apply the same rule for Reception.[/q3]
Having
[q3]> > >>said that, if there is a medical reason for the child's incontinence,[/q3]
[q1]> then[/q1]
[q3]> > >>support should be given for his physical needs.[/q3]
[q3]> > >[/q3]
[q3]> > >With the new disability act, it's illegal not to take a child for that reason, from Sept.[/q3]
[q3]> > >--[/q3]
[q2]> >[/q2]
[q2]> > A normally developed child who is not toilet trained does not fall under[/q2]
[q1]> the[/q1]
[q2]> > heading of "disability." Still, support must be given, for health[/q2]
reasons.
[q2]> >[/q2]
[q2]> > ----------------------------------------------------[/q2]
[q2]> > Sandi[/q2]
[q2]> >[/q2]
[q2]> > Remove NoSpam to reply.[/q2]
[q1]>[/q1]
[q1]>[/q1]
[q1]> I know it's not quite the same but I teach 3 and 4 years olds in a Nursery attached to an Infant[/q1]
[q1]> school in a deprived area. We take children who are not toilet trained and find that having other[/q1]
[q1]> children to take note of[/q1]
they
[q1]> are soon using the loo, cos they want to be the same as them. If we didn't take them in they would[/q1]
[q1]> still be untrained when starting reception. Also[/q1]
we
[q1]> have children who have no language mainly because their parents do not[/q1]
talk
[q1]> to them and again they learn a lot just by being with the other children.[/q1]
We
[q1]> have an LSA who works with a maximum of 5 children out of a group of 26. Also a Nursery nurse and[/q1]
[q1]> a general assistant. Hope this helps.[/q1]
[q1]>[/q1]
[q1]>[/q1]
[q1]>[/q1]
[q1]> ---[/q1]
[q1]> Outgoing mail is certified Virus Free. Checked by AVG anti-virus system (http://www.grisoft.com).[/q1]
[q1]> Version: 6.0.372 / Virus Database: 207 - Release Date: 20/06/2002[/q1]

I agree with what you say, but my experience is that any child not toilet trained by the time they
are 4 is usually due to some kind of developmental delay or other problem. Can you communicate with
his parents at all? If you haven't got an arabic speaking staff member, try to find a parent who can
help. Definitely, I would also suggest contacting his health visitor to get her input. She would
also know if the language delay is due to lack of stimulation - the combination of the two
definitely says to me that something isn't right somewhere.

John
Sarah
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#9
I hope that his lack of language is due to lack of stimulation, but he has been at a play group (not
ours), for over a year, with no improvements. Until I met with mum, all I know about her is that she
has limited English, and is very defensive. My school is in a predominantly whit middle class area,
an I know of nobody who speaks any Arabic at all to act as an interpreter of sorts.

Hopefully, we can set up a meeting before he starts our induction programme in Sept, and hopefully
he has a high banding on the statement. I had hoped to visit and observe him at his play group, but
he's broken his arm, and is currently not attending!!!

Contacting the health visitor is a good idea, but assume that all these agencies must have compiled
reports on the child, which will hopefully come our way soon. Thankfully, this poor development does
not seem to be accompanied by any major anti social behaviour, although he obviously has problems
interacting with other children to a certain extent.

--
Sarah SLieber24 <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]...
[q1]> In article <rvpehu8qv0clkifmuqkgv2o5egrgvn6 [email protected]>, "Sheila :-D" <[email protected]> writes:[/q1]
[q1]>[/q1]
[q2]> >>A normally developed child who is not toilet trained does not fall under[/q2]
the
[q2]> >>heading of "disability."[/q2]
[q2]> >[/q2]
[q2]> >It's not normal though.[/q2]
[q1]>[/q1]
[q1]> It's not normal, but could be environmental. It's not normal for a child[/q1]
of 5
[q1]> to have the vocabulary of a 2 year old, but it doesn't mean there's[/q1]
something
[q1]> wrong with the child. Most often, it's the environment. Sad, but often[/q1]
true.
[q1]>[/q1]
[q1]> ----------------------------------------------------[/q1]
[q1]> Sandi[/q1]
[q1]>[/q1]
[q1]> Remove NoSpam to reply.[/q1]
Sarah
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#10
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#10
[q1]>Lots of fun, lots of play, lots of trips to the loo. and lots of praise and affection, sounds like[/q1]
[q1]>the regime to follow! Record anything and everything and push for support.[/q1]

Couldn't agree more!

Hoping to contact playgroup this week to find out more. Also our excellent EP is on the
case as well.
--

--
Sarah
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