How to improve on maths Watch

Poshtotty
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#1
Report Thread starter 9 years ago
#1
I currently take AS maths and although I got an A for my Core 1, it did take quite a bit of revision, whereas I've noticed that some people did very little and got extremely high marks.

So I was wondering whether doing a lot of maths would actually improve my maths skills and the ability to think more logically? Or is it just a natural thing that you either have or you don't?
0
reply
SimonM
Badges: 18
Rep:
?
#2
Report 9 years ago
#2
(Original post by Poshtotty)
I currently take AS maths and although I got an A for my Core 1, it did take quite a bit of revision, whereas I've noticed that some people did very little and got extremely high marks.

So I was wondering whether doing a lot of maths would actually improve my maths skills and the ability to think more logically? Or is it just a natural thing that you either have or you don't?
Doing lots of maths will improve your maths skills. Some people are more natural at it than others (in my opinion, some neuroscientists on TV* last night disagree), but I think that the vast majority of people** can improve through plenty of practice.

* Some Horizon program with an old comic
** apparently there is something called dyscalculia
0
reply
didgeridoo12uk
Badges: 16
Rep:
?
#3
Report 9 years ago
#3
i think its partly natural.

and generally the people that did very little and got extremely high marks, just make it look like they do very little. but actually revise a fair amount.
0
reply
Mr Dactyl
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#4
Report 9 years ago
#4
(Original post by SimonM)
* Some Horizon program with an old comic
That man's a comedy god! Take back that dismissive tone.

To address the actual thread, I reckon the more questions you do, the more chance you have of gaining a good grade. And I think it's really hard to make any judgements on innate ability; there are loads of things which could appear like innate ability, but not actually be it. For example, high self-confidence, good attention in lessons, and prior ground gained from differing teachers. It's really muddy.
0
reply
Mr Snips
Badges: 15
Rep:
?
#5
Report 9 years ago
#5
It really is all about practice. Those who seemingly do little work have in the past worked hard to understand the main concepts.
0
reply
SimonM
Badges: 18
Rep:
?
#6
Report 9 years ago
#6
(Original post by Mr Dactyl)
That man's a comedy god! Take back that dismissive tone.
So? He was talking about education, not comedy. I disagreed with plenty of the stuff in that programme... but that's for another day
0
reply
becky.fm
Badges: 15
Rep:
?
#7
Report 9 years ago
#7
I think people do a lot more revision that they say they do. I do loads of revision, and i don't mind saying so.
0
reply
JAKstriked
Badges: 1
Rep:
?
#8
Report 9 years ago
#8
(Original post by didgeridoo12uk)
i think its partly natural.

and generally the people that did very little and got extremely high marks, just make it look like they do very little. but actually revise a fair amount.
For most subjects that probably true. In maths, some people can pull off stupidly high marks with little revision.
0
reply
Mr Dactyl
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#9
Report 9 years ago
#9
(Original post by SimonM)
So? He was talking about education, not comedy. I disagreed with plenty of the stuff in that programme... but that's for another day
I'm not against non-specialists talking about an area if they can do it in an incisive and accurate way. They might have a bit of objectivity. Or even with them taking a - possibly mildly misinformed - opinion, if they aren't too vehement about it. Besides, it would've been boring if you'd agreed with all of it!
0
reply
JAKstriked
Badges: 1
Rep:
?
#10
Report 9 years ago
#10
Off topic but I prefered Horizon when it was pretty much quantum physics every week. Now its a mix of drugs, fat people and children.
0
reply
abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz
Badges: 14
Rep:
?
#11
Report 9 years ago
#11
practice. Maths is the easiest A level provided you try and work
0
reply
calvinuk
Badges: 11
Rep:
?
#12
Report 9 years ago
#12
(Original post by JAKstriked)
Off topic but I prefered Horizon when it was pretty much quantum physics every week. Now its a mix of drugs, fat people and children.
It was so much better when it was focused on Physics.
0
reply
Xenomorph v2.1
Badges: 11
Rep:
?
#13
Report 9 years ago
#13
Practice Practice Practice! By doing loads of questions with a systematic method, eventually the method is naturally imprinted in your mind and before you know it you'll be aceing it.
0
reply
maxmadx
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#14
Report 9 years ago
#14
I liken maths to languages, and learning new concepts as vocabulary, with syntax as grammer. If you did not grow up being immersed in maths and try to take on more advanced maths in later life, then that is the same as trying to write a political paper in a language you have only learned a few sentences and words in.

You can always pick up the language of maths later in life, and might get good- but it would take the same effort as getting fluent in a foreign language- and even after hours and hours of constant practice- you will probably always have an accent
0
reply
rupertj
Badges: 2
Rep:
?
#15
Report 9 years ago
#15
I agree with that to an extent, Max, but as long as you were always slightly mathematical at school, I think you can improve significantly. It's happened to myself (though I haven't left school).
0
reply
Simplicity
Badges: 15
Rep:
?
#16
Report 9 years ago
#16
Practice, practice and practiceeee. I'm likely to get A's for Further Maths and Maths. I think it's due to the fact that I spend six hours a day studying Maths outside of regular classes.

P.S. I wouldn't recommend doing that much.

(Original post by maxmadx)
You can always pick up the language of maths later in life, and might get good- but it would take the same effort as getting fluent in a foreign language- and even after hours and hours of constant practice- you will probably always have an accent
Firstly, Maths isn't a language. Secondly, there is no evidence that when you get older it is harder to learn Maths.
0
reply
G.J.Speight
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#17
Report 9 years ago
#17
It's common belief though that as you get older (i.e. after 25 or 30) mathematical ability declines.
0
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

University open days

  • University of East Anglia
    All Departments Open 13:00-17:00. Find out more about our diverse range of subject areas and career progression in the Arts & Humanities, Social Sciences, Medicine & Health Sciences, and the Sciences. Postgraduate
    Wed, 30 Jan '19
  • Solent University
    Careers in maritime Undergraduate
    Sat, 2 Feb '19
  • Sheffield Hallam University
    City and Collegiate Campus Undergraduate
    Sun, 3 Feb '19

The new Gillette ad. Is it:

Man-hating bullsh*t (142)
45.81%
Pro-humanity (168)
54.19%

Watched Threads

View All