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Removing a Knackered Oil sump plug watch

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    Has anyone got any ideas on how to remove a stripped/knackered oil sump plug

    its a torx 40 size

    I've tried wd40 with some plyers at it but it still wont budge

    anyone got any ideas apart from blow torching or welding

    Thanks
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    try using one of these;
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    Yea I might try those or some mole grips
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    mole grips wont be strong enough. the good thing about those adjustable spanner things is the more you turn the tighter they get so they have exceptional gripping and turning strength.
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    I've tried with the adjustable spanner, but onces its finger tight you cant tighten it anymore (it only tightens to the shape) and the fact that the plug is circle makes it pointles as its not holding any grip (if that makes any sense)
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    (Original post by Just Incredible)
    I've tried with the adjustable spanner, but onces its finger tight you cant tighten it anymore (it only tightens to the shape) and the fact that the plug is circle makes it pointles as its not holding any grip (if that makes any sense)
    i thought you were trying to get it off?

    the fact that its circular makes no difference. that spanner thing should grip it easily.

    pics might help. either way you will need a new plug if its been damaged.
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    Buying a new plug to replace the one you're going to remove is the first order of business.

    Beyond that, I'd weld a nut to it and get a decent socket on your new nut.
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    (Original post by JC.)
    Buying a new plug to replace the one you're going to remove is the first order of business.

    Beyond that, I'd weld a nut to it and get a decent socket on your new nut.
    do you use an electric welder? i have one and ill be welding some brackets to my new seats during easter. never welded before
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    Yea I have a new sump plug

    i'll give lara's advice a shot, if that fails i'll just take it to the garage to get it removed
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    I have a Mig and an Arc welder.

    Tip: Practice running a bead on some scrap steel before you start on the real thing.
    I always have to have a little practice before I do jobs as it's not often I get the thing out.
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    (Original post by JC.)
    I have a Mig and an Arc welder.

    Tip: Practice running a bead on some scrap steel before you start on the real thing.
    I always have to have a little practice before I do jobs as it's not often I get the thing out.
    im not going to ask anymore questions and just do some research, dont even know what a bead is :rolleyes:
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    (Original post by Lara C.)
    im not going to ask anymore questions and just do some research, dont even know what a bead is :rolleyes:
    Have a look on here if youre a welding n00b, its really helpful and has forums etc with projects, really helpful guys that'll answer any questions you have..

    http://www.mig-welding.co.uk/

    oh and avoid MIG's from B&Q with a live torch
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    Find a socket which is slightly smaller (SLIGHTLY!) than the outside diameter of the bolt, get a rubber mallet and smack it on. Then get a ratchet spanner and take it off.

    If that doesn't work, grind two flat sides onto it and use Satan's tool. The Adjustable Spanner, RUNNN!

    Graham

    Lara, MiG is a piece of piss, for 3mm plate, set your welder to 20V and probably a wire feed of 6m per minute. Should be a good starting point. (Oh this is normally bang smack in the middle of the feed control if your welder is not calibrated in speeds, say 5 out of 10).

    Keep the torch at a 45 degree angle to the plate, with a lead in angle of 10-15 degrees. Work from left to right. Introduce a slight weave at the start, make a figure of 8 to create the weld pool then progress along the metal at a steady speed in keeping with the size of the weld pool. Make sure your toe lines are parallel and penetration is complete.

    If it is structural welding, leave it to the professionals however, as this normally has to be TiG welded.
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    (Original post by gbduo)
    Find a socket which is slightly smaller (SLIGHTLY!) than the outside diameter of the bolt, get a rubber mallet and smack it on. Then get a ratchet spanner and take it off.
    is hammering on the sump recommend if its alloy?
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    Yeh, it will be fine. As long as you hit the socket and not the sump!

    You are not smashing ten bells out of it, just persuading it on. Hence only slightly smaller.
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    hammering a smaller socket on takes a **** load of force for it to go any sizeable distance. i wouldnt advice it on anything delicate like an alloy sump IMO. far safer methods that can be used.
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    No, a slightly smaller, as in if it is M19, use the imperial equivalent, so it is really M18.5. Half a mm difference.

    Not going to require a lot of force and is common practice in worn nuts and bolts. You are really not going to crack a alloy sump by lightly tapping a socket with a hammer. If you start smacking the socket that is way too small and then miss, you may crack it.

    Use the grinding method then if you feel that is unsafe, but I think that is far worse, you have a file or angle grinder a couple mm from the bottom of your sump, and lack of space. eugh, rather not.

    You could use molegrips or a wrench, but they slip and can cause more damage and end up just creating ragged edges which you can't do **** all with. The brilliant thing about a socket is it applies even force all the way around the nut, the reason it is probably stripped is because it was done up too tight and the tool slipped stripping the inside. A socket will apply even pressue and you are more likely to be successful than with molegrips or wrenches which will again, under load, slip and cause you a whole heap of problems when you eventually come round to getting it off with socket!

    He needs to get a new plug, then use the correct tool for tightening it/undoing it.

    The bottom of a alloy sump is quite thick, as it is what normally comes into contact with the ground and especially around the sump plug area as that is obviously, the lowest point. So, it is also normally the strongest point.

    Of course I could be wrong, but then Lara, you would also be calling engineers with 40 odd years experience wrong as well as that how they teach us, engineers.

    Edit: Just consulted my Zeus Tables. If the outside diameter is 19mm, then use a 47/64 (18.75mm) or 23/32 (18.5mm) to get it off.

    If it is 17mm outside diameter use a 21/32 socket (16.63mm)
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    (Original post by gbduo)
    Of course I could be wrong, but then Lara, you would also be calling engineers with 40 odd years experience wrong as well as that how they teach us, engineers.
    here we go again.....

    how many engineers do you know that recommend hammering a socket onto an alloy sump bolt? apart from risking breaking the threads your going to send massive shock waves through the alloy.

    i would only ever recommend the small socket technique on things which are very strong and stable, like a locking wheel nut, not an alloy sump.
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    you are not hammering! you are tapping! with a rubber mallet!
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    Hammering a socket over a stubborn nut is fine on something solid like suspension hardware.
    I certainly wouldn't hammer a socket over a sump plug.

    The guage of metal is so thin that it'll just bend. If that happens the now curved sump bottom will crush the gauze oil pickup. This means no oil gets to the engine.

    Hammering a socket onto a sump plug is a stupid idea. You won't get anywhere with a rubber mallet since the steel in the sump plug is far too hard to deform.
    All you'll do is get the mallet to bounce back in your face.


    Welding on a nut is the most sensible solution. Additionally, the localised heat generated will also go some way to breaking the bond between the threads.
 
 
 
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