Why did the Nazi's need women workers? Watch

xoJessicaAnn
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#1
Report Thread starter 9 years ago
#1
I can't find anything on why they also needed women workers. I've done my work on why they wanted them to be wives and mothers but due to lack of skilled workers, I know they also needed women workers but weren't prepared to show this much in their propaganda. I've got about a paragraph on it but I need so much more and I don't know where to look now.
Any suggestions would be appreciated SO much!
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mackeroo
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#2
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because all their men were fighting in the army?
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Joanna May
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#3
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Yeah, the same reason Britain did. The men who did the normal jobs were off fighting for their country, so the women had to fill in.
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Snookercraze
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After WW2 broke out, the men were in the army fighting, so the women were needed in the factories for ammunition production.
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Smoosh
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(Original post by mackeroo)
because all their men were fighting in the army?
:ditto:
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Thunder and Jazz
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#6
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And before that, they were militarising society anyway which involved training men to fight, perform public works such as the building of the Autobahns. Same as everyone else says; the men were taken into other roles that had to be filled.
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xoJessicaAnn
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#7
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"Originally, when the Nazi’s imagined the role of a Nazi Woman, work would never have been included. Propaganda claimed that Nazi Women stayed at home and was a good mother and wife; though in reality most women were forced back into employment as Hitler dismissed all Jews and potential soldiers. Hitler claimed that employed women was a curse invented by the Jews and he argued that for the German woman her "world is her husband, her family, her children, and her home." During the election campaign in 1932, Hitler promised that if he gained power he would take 800,000 women out of employment within four years. In August 1933 a law was passed that enabled married couples to obtain loans to set up homes and start families. To pay for this single men and childless couples were taxed more heavily. All women were ordered to stay at home as this made it more likely for them to bear as many children as possible and set up a secure, large family. The Nazi’s soon discovered that they also needed women workers in order to keep up with army demands. As their husbands were being sent off to fight for Germany, women were forced back into work in order to keep up weapon supplies and fill the gaps in unemployment. The Nazi’s introduced a ‘Duty Year’ in 1937, where it became essential for all healthy women to enter the labour market; this usually meant working on a farm or helping out with a family."
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NazB
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#8
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#8
1. When men went to the army, women had to fill in.

2. Woman always had a lot of jobs, however they were purged out of the economy like the Jews, so they just came back as easily when they found the right time!

3. The mood in the world was the emancipation of women, it was an imminent thing. We see this with the clash of rural women and city women. Not physically but we knew it was omnipresent!

4. Women could be paid less, so people liked to hire them for low wages = low cost = higher profits

5. Working towards the Fuhrer! Rural women loved him, so they didn't hesitate in helping in the war effort in any way possible.

Enough? Or do you want more??? You're welcome!
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