Halogenoalkanes Watch

Shacas
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#1
Report Thread starter 9 years ago
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I have several questions that i need help with.

1. Why are chlorinated hydrocarbons not used today in fire extinguishers.
2. Why do chlorine-based insecticides last a long time in the soil?
3. What is produced when 1-chloropropane reacts with alcoholic sodium hydroxide?
4. Give a reason as to why ethylamine is never prepared by reaction of iodoethane and ammonia.
5. Whay could you do to maximise the yield of ethylamine?

Can someone please check my answers and help me with the rest.

1.
2. Is it because they do not break down in the environment, and so remain inthe soil. Are there any other reasons?
3. Is it an alkene? if so which one, because i dont think it is propene, or is it?
4. Is it because off the different products which can be formed, other than ethylamine?
5.

Thank you to anyone that helps.
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Future Doc
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I don't want to be picky but when you say halogenalkanes do you mean haloalkanes?
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Shacas
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(Original post by Future Doc)
I don't want to be picky but when you say halogenalkanes do you mean haloalkanes?
I think they are the same thing according to the internet, but ive always known them as halogenoalkanes.
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EierVonSatan
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(Original post by Future Doc)
I don't want to be picky but when you say halogenalkanes do you mean haloalkanes?
Halogenoalkane is another name for Haloalkane

1. Their combustion products are toxic
2. Not sure - possibly difficult for bacteria to metabolise
3. Propene
4. Repeated reaction ethylamine + ethyl iodide ---> diethylamine etc.
5. Add NH3 in large excess
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Shacas
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(Original post by EierVonSatan)
Halogenoalkane is another name for Haloalkane

1. Their combustion products are toxic
2. Not sure - possibly difficult for bacteria to metabolise
3. Propene
4. Repeated reaction ethylamine + ethyl iodide ---> diethylamine etc.
5. Add NH3 in large excess
Thank you so much for your help.
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Future Doc
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(Original post by Shacas)
I think they are the same thing according to the internet, but ive always known them as halogenoalkanes.
Really? I've always known them as haloalkanes. Well weird.
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chemicalguy
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2. No enzymes in nature for C-Cl bond breaking
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