Is psychology for me? Watch

Tombola
Badges: 17
Rep:
?
#1
Report Thread starter 9 years ago
#1
Background: I'm currently at Leicester doing a different course. Decided to take a Gap Year to decide what course I wanted to do at university and unfortunately it looks like it didn't help much.

I'd like to do psychology as I like learning about theories that I can see applied to people. What's stopping me from definitely transferring to the psychology department are...


  1. The course is nothing like what I expected - especially if I've never done psychology A-level. I don't know what it's like.
  2. The concepts are too basic? - Sat through a 2nd year lecture that was talking about evolutionary psychology.
  3. Worse: That I might get bored of studying the subject.


It doesn't help that these students have told me that they have grown a little tired from studying and reading the same thing. How are other psychology students here finding this?

It'd be great to know that there are students out there who still love their subject even after studying it for several years.
0
quote
reply
ninety_nine
Badges: 1
Rep:
?
#2
Report 9 years ago
#2
I have a mate who's studying Psychology at degree level, after two years of the A-level, and they seem to still be enjoying it a lot. I think it depends on where you study it, because the course content for Psychology tends to vary a lot according to where you go. I for one didn't do Psychology at degree level because, even though it was far and away my favourite A-level, the degree course seemed to quantitive, technical and statistical for my liking (which IMO sucked all the fun out of what I liked about it) at all the good unis I was looking at. Then again, I'm sure there are courses which are more about social psychology, and focus more on the biology side of things, so you'll have to do your own research on that one.

If you literally haven't studied Psychology before, then I'd advise buying one of the large Cardwell textbooks that all A-level students end up worshipping, because it's a great overview to the subject, yet is long enough to give you a solid grounding. In addition read others, and after about two or three, you should get the feeling whether you'd want to/could study this subject for the next three years.
0
quote
reply
GodspeedGehenna
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#3
Report 9 years ago
#3
The thing about Psych is, it's such a broad subject. Alot of the time you have to wade through a load of **** to get to the good stuff, unless you just naturally have an appreciation for the discipline as a whole.

I.e., I adore Biological Psychology, i.e. all the Neuroscience stuff.. I loathe the majority of Social Psych and kinda regret not just going for straight Neuroscience.

But as the above poster said, there is a lot of stats involved. But I kinda enjoy it.

Solutions to your problems:
1. Buy a first year "General" Psychology text book and have a thumb through. You say you enjoy the application of Psych, perhaps read into Attributional theory. Here's a vague description: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Attribution_(psychology)
2. A lot of the concepts are challenging, which I quite enjoy. Some more so than others, obviously.
3. I think all students at some point get bored of their subject from time to time.
0
quote
reply
XxJaninexX
Badges: 13
Rep:
?
#4
Report 9 years ago
#4
Im a first year, but love it. I did it at A level, but even before that would read psych mags etc. I dont know how anyone can be come bored of it! Its so broad and theres always new things being worked on. Of course, there are topics that I find more interesting than others, but thats down to personal choice more than anything (This year we did the psych of happiness, which i hated but i LOVE brain and mind and developmental).

What i will say is, dont just think you will be learning theories. Out of 120 credits, 60 of my credits this year have come from compulsory stats modules. They are the most thrilling lectures i must say, but they are needed.
0
quote
reply
GodspeedGehenna
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#5
Report 9 years ago
#5
(Original post by XxJaninexX)
Of course, there are topics that I find more interesting than others, but thats down to personal choice more than anything (This year we did the psych of happiness, which i hated but i LOVE brain and mind and developmental).
:lolwut:

How weak. Unless it was neurobiological theories of happiness. :teeth:
0
quote
reply
Tombola
Badges: 17
Rep:
?
#6
Report Thread starter 9 years ago
#6
That study sounds awesome!
But I'm the sort of person that likes asking the most basic and 'stupid' questions about things that should be obvious intuitively. I like breaking down things (especially behaviour) into very small steps, although I don't know whether I like doing so in terms of biology. Because then it just becomes "Oh. That's been solved. It's influenced and directed by XYZ function within the brain. There's your fact. Done." - I'll admit I have an extremely limited understanding of neuroscience. :p:

Cheers for the suggestion about reading about the Attribution theory. What I find unique about psychology is the amount of ideas there are floating around that are obvious and understandable. Most people reading the material would think "Well that's just common sense. I do that all the time." but otherwise wouldn't really think much about it.

Can someone give me an idea of what they found more challenging, or the information surprised them? :redface:

While I don't mind statistics (A-level maths). I wouldn't really describe myself as a biology fan. It'd be horrible to find myself in the position where I'm essentially learning neurobiology.

People have told me that most courses accredited by BPS is roughly the same, while at other places I've heard the course structures varies. Should I be too concerned with studying elsewhere as I'm likely to continue with Leicester. I'm happy here :yep:
0
quote
reply
GodspeedGehenna
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#7
Report 9 years ago
#7
(Original post by Tombola)
Can someone give me an idea of what they found more challenging, or the information surprised them? :redface:

While I don't mind statistics (A-level maths). I wouldn't really describe myself as a biology fan. It'd be horrible to find myself in the position where I'm essentially learning neurobiology.

People have told me that most courses accredited by BPS is roughly the same, while at other places I've heard the course structures varies. Should I be too concerned with studying elsewhere as I'm likely to continue with Leicester. I'm happy here :yep:
So far, the main things I have found challenging come from theories of attention and memory. However I think that was more due to the way that it was presented to us by the world's most boring lecturer :p:

Psych does occasionally throw up the odd surprising piece of research, and other times it can produce evidence of those funny little quirks that you may do which actually reveals that you're not the only one who does that. :redface: It's quite amusing to see your own behaviour right there in front of you and you can't help but thing "I do that!!!". Take a look at odd things like the bystander effect which can have some pretty hefty impacts in things like evacuations. I.e. when the world trade centre was hit, many people failed to panic purely because the people around them didn't (because obviously the people around THEM wern't) and ended up doing things like shutting down PCs and going to the toilet :eek: Psych has managed to replicate this phenomena quite potently in various other ways and has investigated what factors can influence it.

I also recently had quite an interesting lecture on cognition and attidues which presented ideas of how to change peoples' behaviour. The typical approach is to target their attitude, but alot of the time, the desired attitude already exists but the behaviour isn't manifested (I.e. "Oh I should really recycle, but I just don't."). However, if you change a person's perceived norms, you can have quite drastic results, increasing a behaviour by 2-4x. Even something as simple as changing the wording on a sign can do this, i.e. from "Please recycle your towels" in a hotel room to "89% of the people staying in this room recycled their towels" etc..

Obviously it isn't ALL neurobiological, Psych is a very broad topic. Often you can be presented with a cognitive theory which may touch on elements of neuroscience to back it up further which adds a nice element of concreteness to it all.

I know that the wiki page has really watered down Attributional theory and might seem like common sense, but if you look into more detailed applications of it, it is absolutely fascinating. I recommend "Madness Explained: Psychosis and Human Nature" by Richard Bentall, a Clinical Psychologist.

:yep:
0
quote
reply
Atrixa
Badges: 10
Rep:
?
#8
Report 9 years ago
#8
I agree- it's a very broad topic, and a lot of the time you end up studying something incredibly dull, then the next week something fascinating. That's how most people find it at A-Level, and looking at the modules for the degree, it doesn't seem much different.

I'd have a look at a few textbooks- avoid the Richard Gross one though (very dry reading).
0
quote
reply
XxJaninexX
Badges: 13
Rep:
?
#9
Report 9 years ago
#9
(Original post by GodspeedGehenna)
I recommend "Madness Explained: Psychosis and Human Nature" by Richard Bentall, a Clinical Psychologist.

:yep:
That is a great read and im lucky to have lectures from Bentall
0
quote
reply
GodspeedGehenna
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#10
Report 9 years ago
#10
(Original post by XxJaninexX)
That is a great read and im lucky to have lectures from Bentall
:eek:

Jealous.
0
quote
reply
Tombola
Badges: 17
Rep:
?
#11
Report Thread starter 9 years ago
#11
Hehe.

Does "Madness Explained: Psychosis and Human Nature" by Richard Bentall contain a fair amount of neurobiology element? Any particular recommendations?

Figured if I'm looking into psychology. I might as well get a rough idea of what is going to be involved in the other aspects of the course.
0
quote
reply
GodspeedGehenna
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#12
Report 9 years ago
#12
(Original post by Tombola)
Hehe.

Does "Madness Explained: Psychosis and Human Nature" by Richard Bentall contain a fair amount of neurobiology element? Any particular recommendations?

Figured if I'm looking into psychology. I might as well get a rough idea of what is going to be involved in the other aspects of the course.
It has a bit of everything really, which is why I think it's such a great book. It also offers insight to the problems that Psychiatry/Clinical Psychology has faced, the ways it has attempted to deal and proposes a new approach. I believe their is a chapter or two based on neurobiology and a sprinkling of it throughout, but it generally contains a lot of variety.

Also keep in mind Clinical Psych is only one branch of Psych also
0
quote
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

University open days

  • University of Lincoln
    Mini Open Day at the Brayford Campus Undergraduate
    Wed, 19 Dec '18
  • University of East Anglia
    UEA Mini Open Day Undergraduate
    Fri, 4 Jan '19
  • Bournemouth University
    Undergraduate Mini Open Day Undergraduate
    Wed, 9 Jan '19

Were you ever put in isolation at school?

Yes (147)
27.68%
No (384)
72.32%

Watched Threads

View All