Carbs/Protein/Fat and exercising Watch

frankie77
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Hi everyone

I'm female, early 20s and go to the gym 3-4 times a week (not to trying and lose weight I just like to feel fitter and healthier). Anyway, currently the calories I eat are coming from:

Carbs: 52%
Fat: 27% (saturated fat 7%)
Protein: 21%

My other results were:
Height:161cm
Weight: 54kg
Waist: 65cm
Body fat: 27%!!! (I know this is too high, want to get it down to low 20s)

My question is basically whether my diet is ok to be healthy (and ideally reduce body fat a bit too) or I need to be eating differently?

Thanks
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keepoffthelawn
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I'd cut the carbs and up the protein. Matter of fact, why not cut all grains while you're at it? That's what i've done and its the best choice i ever made
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frankie77
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(Original post by keepoffthelawn)
I'd cut the carbs and up the protein. Matter of fact, why not cut all grains while you're at it? That's what i've done and its the best choice i ever made
Do you exercise much??
I can't imagine I'd have much energy without porridge / cereal / rice etc. And how do you get enough fibre in your diet??
Do you feel better because of it?
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gdnb
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Reduce carb intake, up protein intake for sure. In terms of exercise, there a number of options, personally I would go for early morning steady state cardio and weight training.
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gdnb
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Just to add: The early morning steady state cardio is a good option for fat loss, I went from about 12%BF down to about 8% BF, ripped to the bone!
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keepoffthelawn
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(Original post by frankie77)
Do you exercise much??
I can't imagine I'd have much energy without porridge / cereal / rice etc. And how do you get enough fibre in your diet??
Do you feel better because of it?
Well i exercise about 3-4 times a week, i do running, rowing machine and weights. Instead of grains i eat a lot of protein rich foods that keep me full for longer (meat, chicken, salmon, tuna, cottage cheese), nuts (cashews, almonds etc), fruit, berries and lots of veggies. I quit grains gradually because i wanted to get rid of my sugar addiction and eating pasta/rice/bread/potatoes made it a lot more difficult because their carbohydrates are only one digestive step away from being sugar and therefore act very similarly to white sugar in your body. Refined sugar is really an addictive and harmful substance and is of no benefit to your body - so why eat it? Actually, if sugar was introduced today it would be classified as a drug because how strong of an addiction it causes.

I definitely feel better after quitting grains although it was difficult and took a lot of determination and time (about 6 months to quit completely). Now i don't get crazy uncontrollable cravings anymore, i can choose sensibly what i put in my mouth, my complexion has cleared up, i'm rarely swollen, i'm more energetic, i sleep better and i've lost weight. When you think about it, eating grains has never really been a natural thing for humans. Please read this - a excellent explanation on why you shouldn't eat grains.
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MeAndBubbles
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Seems good to me, don't worry.
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ch0c0h01ic
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(Original post by frankie77)
I'm female, early 20s and go to the gym 3-4 times a week (not to trying and lose weight I just like to feel fitter and healthier). Anyway, currently the calories I eat are coming from:

Carbs: 52%
Fat: 27% (saturated fat 7%)
Protein: 21%
If you want decent advice post:

1. Your WHOLE diet not just a macro-nutrient breakdown. It means very little, for all we know you eat cookies and burgers all day.

2. Your WHOLE workout routine. What do you specifically do in the gym? For all we know you spend 40mins chatting with your mates.
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frankie77
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(Original post by ch0c0h01ic)
If you want decent advice post:

1. Your WHOLE diet not just a macro-nutrient breakdown. It means very little, for all we know you eat cookies and burgers all day.

2. Your WHOLE workout routine. What do you specifically do in the gym? For all we know you spend 40mins chatting with your mates.
Ok well I kept a food diary for a week which gave the carbs/fat/protein above, so I'll just give some examples from it:

breakfast - porridge / yoghurts / muesli bars/ skimmed lattes / bananas (btw I have to eat breakfast at my desk so can't do toast / eggs/ anything cooked)

lunch - tuna & sweetcorn sandwiches / chicken salad sandwiches / egg salad sandwiches / jacket potato with chilli / apples / more yoghurts

dinners - chicken or beef stir fry + noodles or brown rice / salmon or chicken with roasted veg / lentil daal + rice / occasional meal out or takeaway

snacks - yoghurts / brazil nuts / walnuts / dark chocolate / different types of fruit

drinks - far too much tea and coffee (around 5 of each per day), skimmed lattes, fruit tea, water, couple glasses of wine per week

I have had eating problems in the past and still can't face milk chocolate, biscuits, cheese, desserts, pasta, chips or fruit juice (weirdly!)

In the gym I mainly use treadmill and run for about an hour twice a week and 45 mins twice a week. Occassionally use the rowing machine / cross trainer. Don't do any weights although I am going next week to meet someone to show me what to do cos I know I should!
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ch0c0h01ic
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(Original post by frankie77)
Ok well I kept a food diary for a week which gave the carbs/fat/protein above, so I'll just give some examples from it:

breakfast - porridge / yoghurts / muesli bars/ skimmed lattes / bananas (btw I have to eat breakfast at my desk so can't do toast / eggs/ anything cooked)

lunch - tuna & sweetcorn sandwiches / chicken salad sandwiches / egg salad sandwiches / jacket potato with chilli / apples / more yoghurts

dinners - chicken or beef stir fry + noodles or brown rice / salmon or chicken with roasted veg / lentil daal + rice / occasional meal out or takeaway

snacks - yoghurts / brazil nuts / walnuts / dark chocolate / different types of fruit

drinks - far too much tea and coffee (around 5 of each per day), skimmed lattes, fruit tea, water, couple glasses of wine per week

I have had eating problems in the past and still can't face milk chocolate, biscuits, cheese, desserts, pasta, chips or fruit juice (weirdly!)
Pretty good.

(Original post by frankie77)
In the gym I mainly use treadmill and run for about an hour twice a week and 45 mins twice a week. Occassionally use the rowing machine / cross trainer. Don't do any weights although I am going next week to meet someone to show me what to do cos I know I should!
Look into HIIT, it's a much better use of your time than simply going on the treadmill for X mins. Also run outside, more enjoyable and a better workout.
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Sorry...Alright...Well...
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(Original post by keepoffthelawn)
Well i exercise about 3-4 times a week, i do running, rowing machine and weights. Instead of grains i eat a lot of protein rich foods that keep me full for longer (meat, chicken, salmon, tuna, cottage cheese), nuts (cashews, almonds etc), fruit, berries and lots of veggies. I quit grains gradually because i wanted to get rid of my sugar addiction and eating pasta/rice/bread/potatoes made it a lot more difficult because their carbohydrates are only one digestive step away from being sugar and therefore act very similarly to white sugar in your body. Refined sugar is really an addictive and harmful substance and is of no benefit to your body - so why eat it? Actually, if sugar was introduced today it would be classified as a drug because how strong of an addiction it causes.

I definitely feel better after quitting grains although it was difficult and took a lot of determination and time (about 6 months to quit completely). Now i don't get crazy uncontrollable cravings anymore, i can choose sensibly what i put in my mouth, my complexion has cleared up, i'm rarely swollen, i'm more energetic, i sleep better and i've lost weight. When you think about it, eating grains has never really been a natural thing for humans. Please read this - a excellent explanation on why you shouldn't eat grains.
Thanks for this, I'm lucky I saw this before I ate my usual breakfast of cereal...
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ch0c0h01ic
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(Original post by keepoffthelawn)
When you think about it, eating grains has never really been a natural thing for humans. Please read this - a excellent explanation on why you shouldn't eat grains.
The consensus is carbs in moderation and to be intelligent about which ones you tend to eat (ie; unrefined/whole as opposed to highly refined) rather than the case that all carbs are evil. Grains are cheap, they're full of fibre, rich in protein, can reduce cholesterol levels, etc. They're not without benefit but Mark Sisson does excessively demonise them.

For example we get told about how the high fibre content in grains can inhibit vitamin and mineral absorption, ok, but he forgets to mention that most of the vegetables and fruits he recommends as part of his primal blueprint are even HIGHER in fibre.

Lectins? Yes they're found in grains, but they're also found in nuts, seeds and beans, again, more foods which he recommends on his site.

Gluten? Allergenic? They can be, but at the same time lactose is said to be more allergenic yet milk and dairy products are something which he recommends.

Yes, diets high in carbs (particularly sugar) have been linked to diabetes, then again diets high in red meat have also been linked to diabetes and heart disease (again, something he recommends).

He is a man of contradictions. Take what St Mark says with a pinch of salt he does have an agenda (namely creating his own 'Primal Blueprint' to flog in book form and make a hell of a lot of money).
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keepoffthelawn
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The consensus is carbs in moderation and to be intelligent about which ones you tend to eat (ie; unrefined/whole as opposed to highly refined) rather than the case that all carbs are evil. Grains are cheap, they're full of fibre, rich in protein, can reduce cholesterol levels, etc. They're not without benefit but Mark Sisson does excessively demonise them.
When did i ever say anything about removing carbs from your diet? Grains might equal carbs but carbs dont equal grains. When you replace the grains in your diet with vegetables you definitely won't be deficient of carbs in any way.

PS. Grains are definitely not a 'rich' source of protein, especially not rice/pasta/potatoes/wheat that are the most common in the western world. Quinoa and couscous on the other hand have more protein, but they're definitely not that 'rich' in protein as you make it sound.

For example we get told about how the high fibre content in grains can inhibit vitamin and mineral absorption, ok, but he forgets to mention that most of the vegetables and fruits he recommends as part of his primal blueprint are even HIGHER in fibre.
The problem with grains (and legumes as well as some nuts) is not just the (possible) fibre content, its the phytic acid that drastically restricts how well we can utilise the minerals and vitamins present in grains.

Lectins? Yes they're found in grains, but they're also found in nuts, seeds and beans, again, more foods which he recommends on his site.
So? If you'd actually looked into the matter in greater detail you'd notice that the proportion of nuts, seeds and beans he recommends is not nearly enough to negate the effect of removing grains from your diet.

Gluten? Allergenic? They can be, but at the same time lactose is said to be more allergenic yet milk and dairy products are something which he recommends.
A.Please give me a source to back up your claim that 'lactose is said to be more allergenic'.

B.No he doesn't. He specifically says that dairy should be avoided.

Yes, diets high in carbs (particularly sugar) have been linked to diabetes, then again diets high in red meat have also been linked to diabetes and heart disease (again, something he recommends).
Very true, but only because the animals are fed grains which results in meat that is rich in omega 6 that leads to heart disease. The key is to eat grass fed meat. (of course red meat isn't the only meat you should eat).


He is a man of contradictions.
Do you know him personally?

Take what St Mark says with a pinch of salt he does have an agenda (namely creating his own 'Primal Blueprint' to flog in book form and make a hell of a lot of money).
He isn't the only one advocating a diet like this. The diet also goes under the names: Paleolithic diet and Hunter-gatherer diet.

In the end any diet you come across will be from someones subjective point of view, even the diet the government promotes (have you ever taken a look at the food pyramid? its ridiculous.). So what makes a government promoted(i take it that's what you see as the ideal) diet more 'right' than any other? Is it the fact that an authority promotes it?
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frankie77
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Hey guys, thanks for your replies.

I'm going to the gym first thing tomorrow so I will try out the HIIT. I usually run on 10kph so I was thinking alternate 1 min on 12 kph with 2 mins on 10 kph. Does that sound ok? I don't want to lose weight, just reduce body fat (if that's possible).

Didn't mean to cause carbs debate! I think I will carry on eating some grains, I'm meant to be trying to increase the range of foods I eat rather than cutting things out
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keepoffthelawn
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haha sorry for hijacking the thread.. I'm glad if the grain debate is over and done with seeming we all have stubborn conflicting views on the issue and no ones probably gona change their mind anyway..

But best of luck with your plan!
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Tufts
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I hate it when people say cut carbs :sad:
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ch0c0h01ic
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(Original post by keepoffthelawn)
PS. Grains are definitely not a 'rich' source of protein, especially not rice/pasta/potatoes/wheat that are the most common in the western world. Quinoa and couscous on the other hand have more protein, but they're definitely not that 'rich' in protein as you make it sound.
Potatoes aren't grains and couscous is actually derived from wheat

Crude wheat germ contains 20+g of protein per 100g, which is what is what most would classify as being 'high' in protein. Quinoa and oats, ~15g/100, not bad, etc.

The problem with grains (and legumes as well as some nuts) is not just the (possible) fibre content, its the phytic acid that drastically restricts how well we can utilise the minerals and vitamins present in grains.

So? If you'd actually looked into the matter in greater detail you'd notice that the proportion of nuts, seeds and beans he recommends is not nearly enough to negate the effect of removing grains from your diet.
My point is hypocrisy. For grains he reels out all sorts of weird, wonderful and exaggerated arguments against them yet conveniently forgets said factors about other foods which he recommends.

Phytic acid? There are many anti nutritional factors out there. Many, including phytic acid are broken down almost completely by cooking.

B.No he doesn't. He specifically says that dairy should be avoided.
I've searched his whole site, no mention of avoiding dairy. In fact a fair few of his recipes use small amounts of milk and the like.

Very true, but only because the animals are fed grains which results in meat that is rich in omega 6 that leads to heart disease. The key is to eat grass fed meat. (of course red meat isn't the only meat you should eat).
There's a bit more to it than that:

Red Meat and Type 2 Diabetes in Women

Red meat, especially processed meat, contains certain types of preservatives, additives, or other chemicals arising from meat preparation, including preservation, packaging, and cooking. These compounds include nitrates and nitrites added in meat processing as well as a variety of heterocyclic amines and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons formed in red meat, especially when cooked well done.[17] These compounds can be converted to N-nitrosamines,[17] which were found to be toxic to pancreatic β-cell.[18] Consumption of foods with a high content of nitrites and nitrosamines has been associated with type 1 diabetes.[19-21] Also, advanced glycation and lipoxidation end products produced during the cooking or processing of meat have been associated with insulin resistance and diabetes-related complications in animal models[22] and human subjects.[23,24] Therefore, such specific compounds mainly present in processed meat might largely explain the observed significant association between processed meat intake and type 2 diabetes.

Nevertheless, red meat is also a major source for saturated fat, cholesterol, animal protein, and heme iron. It has been shown that certain types of fat from red meat may play a major role in the development of type 2 diabetes.[9,25] As noted in a recent review, epidemiological evidence for the relevance of dietary fats and risk of type 2 diabetes seem to be inconsistent.[25] The present study did not show any positive associations between intakes of saturated fat or trans fatty acid and risk of type 2 diabetes. Likewise, we found no evidence of decreased risk of diabetes with increased intake of monounsaturated or polyunsaturated fatty acids or vegetable fat. However, cholesterol intake tended to be positively related to an elevated risk of diabetes. Cholesterol intake from red meat may thus explain, at least in part, the observed association between red meat intake and type 2 diabetes.
http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/488923_4

Do you know him personally?
No but I've been reading his work for a fair amount of time now.

He isn't the only one advocating a diet like this. The diet also goes under the names: Paleolithic diet and Hunter-gatherer diet.
...but pretty much every 'expert' these days is trying to sell a similar product.

In the end any diet you come across will be from someones subjective point of view, even the diet the government promotes (have you ever taken a look at the food pyramid? its ridiculous.). So what makes a government promoted(i take it that's what you see as the ideal) diet more 'right' than any other? Is it the fact that an authority promotes it?
[/QUOTE]

Food pyramid? At the end of the day it's for your average joe so implementing something which is very stringent isn't going to be kept to. Introducing a level of moderation is better than having none at all. Secondly it's about what is available and cost effective. Not everyone can afford grass fed meats and fresh veg all the time, it is expensive, which is why cheaper sources of food (such as grains) are recommended as opposed to junk, takeaways, etc.

Yes, most diets have a level of subjectivity to them and bias, that is why you look at them collectively and take from them what is most beneficial and exhibit moderation rather than resigning to one system.
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MeAndBubbles
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(Original post by frankie77)
Hi everyone

I'm female, early 20s and go to the gym 3-4 times a week (not to trying and lose weight I just like to feel fitter and healthier). Anyway, currently the calories I eat are coming from:

Carbs: 52%
Fat: 27% (saturated fat 7%)
Protein: 21%

My other results were:
Height:161cm
Weight: 54kg
Waist: 65cm
Body fat: 27%!!! (I know this is too high, want to get it down to low 20s)

My question is basically whether my diet is ok to be healthy (and ideally reduce body fat a bit too) or I need to be eating differently?

Thanks

According to T Colin Campbell you should eat between 8-10% protein, which means your diet will increase the risk of cancers, breast cancer. Ideally eat more plant material. Genetically and visually we are close to apes like Bonobo's, and they only have 1% of calories from meat.

Colin Campbell is a vegan who has done the biggest study of diet called the China Study.
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Brotherhood
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(Original post by MeAndBubbles)
According to T Colin Campbell you should eat between 8-10% protein, which means your diet will increase the risk of cancers, breast cancer. Ideally eat more plant material. Genetically and visually we are close to apes like Bonobo's, and they only have 1% of calories from meat.
They also need to consume 18kg of plant material to get the required nutrients. It's because vegetation is freely available, not because it's choice.
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