Choosing the right IT course... Watch

Sparxy
Badges: 3
Rep:
?
#1
Report Thread starter 9 years ago
#1
Hey,

I'll be applying for uni this September but wanted to think now and have a look at some unis and think what course I want to take.

For me, it has to be IT related.. I love gaming (quite competitive and an enthusiast ) being creative and doing things like graphics designing (Photoshop/etc) and have recently gained an interest and want to learn to use 3D rendering programs suchas Cinema 4D, 3DS Max, etc.. But I also love doing practical work with computers such as building, troubleshooting, etc.. Along with networking tasks, etc (non-programming!).. I'm also into general IT computer system infrastructures, servers, general hardware, and I find IT Security particularly interesting for some reason..

My only hate is I do not want to do anything programming-related, hate it! Haha, tried VB, Java, C++ - despise them! It's not I can't do them, it just takes me a lot to learn it and get it into my head, I just in general do not like programming..

Does anyone have any ideas what sort of course you reckon would suit me or I'd be interested in? Oh and if it helps, I'm from Grimsby so the North East of England.. Any northern and maybe midlands unis I'm interested in...


Thanks.

P.S. Does anyone know what 3D programs are used in courses such as Games Design, Graphics Design, etc? For example courses such as this or this?
0
quote
reply
TrisK
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#2
Report 9 years ago
#2
Try herts, they do a variety of computer courses.
And a fair few of them are on media + gaming and other areas of technology other than just programming
0
quote
reply
Jiser
Badges: 1
Rep:
?
#3
Report 9 years ago
#3
Getting into game design is going to involve coding eventually unless your purely level design/graphics/art/textures.

You say you like troubleshooting as well?

I would think to yourself what do you want to be doing in 10 years time, what would you prefer? Game creation or troubleshooting. Both areas are highly competitive however I would imagine 'support' is easier to get into than gaming.

If I was you I would go for a generalized course e.g. Computer Science. Most things will involve some sort of coding unless you go for a purely network side of things.

www.certforums.co.uk will be a good place for you to go.

Anyway feel free to msg me. - I been working in I.T. support for 3 years + a colleague creates in house educational games.
0
quote
reply
Sparxy
Badges: 3
Rep:
?
#4
Report Thread starter 9 years ago
#4
(Original post by Jiser)
If I was you I would go for a generalized course e.g. Computer Science. Most things will involve some sort of coding unless you go for a purely network side of things.
I forgot to mention I love computer networking as well, not the programming side either!

Added to original post:

"I'm also into general IT computer system infrastructures, servers, general hardware, and I find IT Security particularly interesting for some reason.."
0
quote
reply
Jiser
Badges: 1
Rep:
?
#5
Report 9 years ago
#5
I would look around for a networking course. One perhaps with a year out in industry. I can't emphasize enough the year out in industry. Between then and now I would work on studying towards your CompTIA Network+ and A+. These are entry level certs + will give you hell of a head start + put you ahead of others who are starting out.

You might even be able to pick up a part time I.T. job at a school or something once the above are done and you have started at uni.

Bare in mind tho that your networking course will probs be heavy theory most of the time - most of it you will never use again or never need to know until your like high up in the I.T. world doing hardcore WAN stuff. So alot of it will be pretty dull.
0
quote
reply
cherrion
Badges: 1
Rep:
?
#6
Report 9 years ago
#6
If you get into the right networking job, it is very well paid. But it is very specialised, so if you choose a networking degree, then you will only cover networking(some universities may also offer you Cisco CCNA & CCNP which is widely regarded in the industry). if you really like everything, then I would say a Computer Science course, as you often get to choose a wide variety of modules.

also regarding the networking, Currently I am taking CCNA at school and hope to do CCNP at Anglia Ruskin. I wouldn't say it is extremely difficult, but it can be very frustrating(like trying to troubleshoot OSPF for CCNA 3 exam). Personally I really want to go into Network administration. If you know the type of IT career you want, then use that as guidance and choose a degree specific to that job. Hope I have helped and not rambled too much.

With regards to the most above, make sure that any networking degree/qualification has a lot of practical lab time. It is well and good learning something in theory. But you never truly understand it until you have actually done it.
0
quote
reply
Sparxy
Badges: 3
Rep:
?
#7
Report Thread starter 9 years ago
#7
Thanks for the tips. Im interested now in the CompTIA Network+ and A+ certifications, could you provide anymore information on this? Like what is it really about? Like how it all works? Is there some work material/revision I can download, buy books and stuff and do tasks, etc and then book the exam for it once I'm ready and such?

How does it all work and what would it do for me? Were can I get some work material for this?

http://www.amazon.co.uk/s/ref=nb_ss_...ompTIA&x=0&y=0

I've searched Amazon (see above), would any of this be beneficial for me?



Thanks.
0
quote
reply
Sparxy
Badges: 3
Rep:
?
#8
Report Thread starter 9 years ago
#8
Anyone?
0
quote
reply
cherrion
Badges: 1
Rep:
?
#9
Report 9 years ago
#9
I don't know about the A+, but if you want to do networking, follow the Cisco route.
0
quote
reply
nojoegohome
Badges: 1
Rep:
?
#10
Report 9 years ago
#10
A+ is quite useful

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Certificatio...899075&sr=8-19

Thats probably the best book to get

www.certforums.co.uk that forum basically has everything you want to know
0
quote
reply
TheQueenOfComputerScience
Badges: 11
Rep:
?
#11
Report 9 years ago
#11
I think if you want get into the games industry go for a course which is going to teach you 3D art as good 3D artists are the most in demand.
0
quote
reply
Jiser
Badges: 1
Rep:
?
#12
Report 9 years ago
#12
As said above certforums.

Selfstudy for A+ N+ these are entry level certs. Get yourself the study stuff from amazon. Maybe some equipment to practice on. From there perhaps aim for the MCSDT.

If you have no experiance there is really no need to go any further than the above certs unelss your doing an academic qualification.

Professional certs, certify your knowledge. The ones above are 'entry level'! An 18 year old fresh out of college with a CCNA is not going to be looked kindly upon. Without the experiance to back it up you have no chance. Your money is best spent elsewhere not on Cisco stuff at the moment.

All the stuff sales people, teachers etc spin you about how this will get you loads of money is bull I am afraid.

Try not to become a 'paper cert only'. A piece of paper can mean not alot if you can't produce the goods. Also lets face it, your not gonna be let out wild on a companies infrastructure all due to your CCNA. The realities of the real world is very different.
0
quote
reply
Sparxy
Badges: 3
Rep:
?
#13
Report Thread starter 9 years ago
#13
Yup, I'm personally interested in the Network+ 2009 cert and was looking at the A+ as well but wondering if there's any point as I've been doing a little research and the 2009 exam/objectives come out around summer time, making the old one kind of out-dated and pointless.

In the 2009 I've read they are removing a fair bit of old out-of-date topics and adding the new up-to-date content...

So I'm considering wheither to just do Network+ 2009 for now and do A+ 2009 later when it is out?
0
quote
reply
nojoegohome
Badges: 1
Rep:
?
#14
Report 9 years ago
#14
The updates dont matter much at all if you have the old specs or new specs an employer will still consider them the same.
0
quote
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

University open days

  • University of Lincoln
    Mini Open Day at the Brayford Campus Undergraduate
    Wed, 19 Dec '18
  • University of East Anglia
    UEA Mini Open Day Undergraduate
    Fri, 4 Jan '19
  • Bournemouth University
    Undergraduate Mini Open Day Undergraduate
    Wed, 9 Jan '19

Were you ever put in isolation at school?

Yes (233)
27.51%
No (614)
72.49%

Watched Threads

View All