s's vs s' (Ross's or Ross')

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Big Kabz
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#1
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#1
Gramatically which is correct

If I wanted to say "The car of Ross" in a different way, which would be correct?

Ross's car

or

Ross' car
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NW8_SW1_EC3
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#2
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#2
Ross'
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faber niger
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The latter. End of thread.

(Though some people do use the former, and as such it is becoming an accepted alternative.)
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LooieENG
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I was always led to believe it was Ross's unless the surname sounded like it already ended in 's. For example, Ross's, not Ross' but it would be Jones' not Jones's

Grammar/English was never really my strong point though.#

Edit: Maybe I'm thinking of if it was a family? For example, the Jones' car, as opposed to the Jones's car?
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ThePants999
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(Original post by jismith1989)
The latter. End of thread.

(Though some people do use the former, and as such it is becoming an accepted alternative.)
This, in its entirety.
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qgujxj39
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#6
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We were debating this in Chemistry with Hess' Law.

(Wikipedia doesn't agree with me.)
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LooieENG
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#7
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#7
• add 's to the singular form of the word (even if it ends in -s):

the owner's car

James's hat

• add 's to the plural forms that do not end in -s:

the children's game

the geese's honking

• add ' to the end of plural nouns that end in -s:

houses' roofs

three friends' letters

• add 's to the end of compound words:

my brother-in-law's money

• add 's to the last noun to show joint possession of an object:

Todd and Anne's apartment

(just stole off the internet)
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Zhen Lin
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Nor do a number of other sources: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Saxon_genitive

Some respected style guides such as The Chicago Manual of Style recommend the more modern addition of an s but specifically state that both habits are correct. Other references such as The Elements of Style and the Canadian Press Stylebook hold that the s is mandatory with only two exceptions: classical and Biblical proper names (e.g. "Jesus' teachings", "Augustus' guards") and common phrases that do not take the s (e.g. "for goodness' sake"). In all other cases, it is incorrect to omit the s.
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zef99
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Both are correct, however, the more correct of the two is Ross's car. If you speak it aloud as well, then there is a clear difference and one sounds more right than the other.
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balloon_parade
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We teach both in schools (maybe because it is quite a difficult concept to grasp at first?) but encourage the children to use Ross'
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20083
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(Original post by jismith1989)
The latter. End of thread.

(Though some people do use the former, and as such it is becoming an accepted alternative.)
Wrong. It is the former. Some people use the latter as it looks tidier and they get confused with the difference between showing ownership of a plural word compared to other words that end in s. The correct way is Ross's.
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FunLady
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I was told that if a noun ended in the letter 's' then it would it Ross' rather than Ross's because it would be difficult to pronounce...
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20083
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(Original post by FunLady)
I was told that if a noun ended in the letter 's' then it would it Ross' rather than Ross's because it would be difficult to pronounce...
So you would say "Is that Ross bike?" Say it out loud.
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FunLady
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(Original post by SillyFencer)
So you would say "Is that Ross bike?" Say it out loud.
I'd write it Ross' but say Ross's.
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20083
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#15
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(Original post by FunLady)
I'd write it Ross' but say Ross's.
Why change it then?
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zar91
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Our A-Level English teacher said that it's supposed to be Ross' but Ross's is generally becoming more acceptable. I don't know the ins and outs of everything though.
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Tinkerbee
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#17
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Ross' is correct.
Ross's is wrong.

Feck this "language changes through time" malarky.
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20083
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(Original post by Tinkerbee)
Ross' is correct.
Ross's is wrong.

Feck this "language changes through time" malarky.
St James's Park
Various "Ross's" http://www.google.co.uk/search?q=fri...ient=firefox-a
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FunLady
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(Original post by SillyFencer)
Why change it then?
I guess - as you said earlier - it's neater
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Tinkerbee
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(Original post by SillyFencer)
St James's Park
Various "Ross's" http://www.google.co.uk/search?q=fri...ient=firefox-a

*twitches*

Do you want to see me cry? :woo:
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