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    Dear All,

    I don't understand which one of two sentences is correct in formal english. IT is I , U are looking
    for. and It is me, U are looking for.

    one may think the second one is correct inasmuch as he remembers the same sentence in the lyrics of
    song "HELLO" sung by well-known singer Lionel Richie.

    but in the book named "BARRON's How to prepare for the Toefl Te\est", problems 43ubject pronouns
    in Complement position, they say: "avoiding using an object pronoun instead of a subject pronoun
    after the verb BE" and

    the example: "it is HE whom the committee has named " is given.

    According to the book, we have to choose the first one as the correct answer in formal english.

    "it is I you are looking for."

    I am wondering that: if in TOEFL test I have to solve that type of problem. What is the solution.??

    You all here please answer me , Thank you

    M_RUDKY wrote:
    [q1]>[/q1]
    [q1]> Dear All,[/q1]
    [q1]>[/q1]
    [q1]> I don't understand which one of two sentences is correct in formal english. IT is I , U are[/q1]
    [q1]> looking for. and It is me, U are looking for.[/q1]
    [q1]>[/q1]
    [q1]> one may think the second one is correct inasmuch as he remembers the same sentence in the lyrics[/q1]
    [q1]> of song "HELLO" sung by well-known singer Lionel Richie.[/q1]
    [q1]>[/q1]
    [q1]> but in the book named "BARRON's How to prepare for the Toefl Te\est", problems 43ubject pronouns[/q1]
    [q1]> in Complement position, they say: "avoiding using an object pronoun instead of a subject pronoun[/q1]
    [q1]> after the verb BE" and[/q1]
    [q1]>[/q1]
    [q1]> the example: "it is HE whom the committee has named " is given.[/q1]
    [q1]>[/q1]
    [q1]> According to the book, we have to choose the first one as the correct answer in formal english.[/q1]
    [q1]>[/q1]
    [q1]> "it is I you are looking for."[/q1]
    [q1]>[/q1]
    [q1]> I am wondering that: if in TOEFL test I have to solve that type of problem. What is the[/q1]
    [q1]> solution.??[/q1]
    [q1]>[/q1]
    [q1]> You all here please answer me , Thank you[/q1]

    It may be necessary to use this form to pass a grammar/usage based written exam like the TOEFL, but
    to me this usage sounds very old fashioned, even in a formal setting.

    I wouldn't say that it's wrong, but I know nobody who speaks naturally who uses this form even in
    the most formal setting and I would never use it myself. I always tend to think that native speakers
    who use this form are being a bit pretentious.

    Regards, Einde o'Callaghan

    Einde O'Callaghan <[email protected]> burbled
    news:[email protected]:

    [q1]> M_RUDKY wrote:[/q1]
    [q2]>>[/q2]
    [q2]>> Dear All,[/q2]
    [q2]>>[/q2]
    [q2]>> I don't understand which one of two sentences is correct in formal english. IT is I , U are[/q2]
    [q2]>> looking for. and It is me, U are looking for.[/q2]
    [q2]>>[/q2]
    [q2]>> one may think the second one is correct inasmuch as he remembers the same sentence in the lyrics[/q2]
    [q2]>> of song "HELLO" sung by well-known singer Lionel Richie.[/q2]
    [q2]>>[/q2]
    [q2]>> but in the book named "BARRON's How to prepare for the Toefl Te\est", problems 43ubject[/q2]
    [q2]>> pronouns in Complement position, they say: "avoiding using an object pronoun instead of a subject[/q2]
    [q2]>> pronoun after the verb BE" and[/q2]
    [q2]>>[/q2]
    [q2]>> the example: "it is HE whom the committee has named " is given.[/q2]
    [q2]>>[/q2]
    [q2]>> According to the book, we have to choose the first one as the correct answer in formal english.[/q2]
    [q2]>>[/q2]
    [q2]>> "it is I you are looking for."[/q2]
    [q2]>>[/q2]
    [q2]>> I am wondering that: if in TOEFL test I have to solve that type of problem. What is the[/q2]
    [q2]>> solution.??[/q2]

    The solution for any question of this type on the TOEFL test is always to give the formal English,
    "It is I" and never the idiomatic and now standard English "It's me" or "It is me". You must also
    answer with "whom" if the question wants to know whether it should be

    A. Who are you looking for? or B. Whom are you looking for?

    [q1]>[/q1]
    [q1]> It may be necessary to use this form to pass a grammar/usage based written exam like the TOEFL,[/q1]
    [q1]> but to me this usage sounds very old fashioned, even in a formal setting.[/q1]
    [q1]>[/q1]
    [q1]> I wouldn't say that it's wrong, but I know nobody who speaks naturally who uses this form even in[/q1]
    [q1]> the most formal setting and I would never use it myself. I always tend to think that native[/q1]
    [q1]> speakers who use this form are being a bit pretentious.[/q1]

    As Einde says, we native speakers don't use these formal forms anymore. Only in very formal wirting,
    and not always there.

    --
    Franke: Grammar 1: Internalized rules for the spoken language. Grammar 2: Formal rules for the
    written language. Grammar 1 does not equal Grammar 2.
 
 
 
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