Urgrent!!! help please Watch

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M_rudky
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#1
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What is the mistake in following sentence

Neither of us are living off campus this semester because the rents were too high
Einde O'Callagh
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M_RUDKY wrote:
[q1]>[/q1]
[q1]> What is the mistake in following sentence[/q1]
[q1]>[/q1]
[q1]> Neither of us are living off campus this semester because the rents were too high[/q1]

I would say: "Neither of us is living off-campus this year because the rents are too high." "neither
of us" is a singular subject (one person), and the rent problem is probably also current. But, of
course, the latter may refer to the fact that a fixed term lease had to be agreed and at the time we
were looking the rents were too high although they may now be lower.

If this is a test question it's a bad one because it asks for one mistake but there are potentially
two (unless you have further context). Grammatical test questions of this sort should always have
one (and only one) potentially correct solution.

Regards, Einde O'Callaghan
Cybercypher
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Einde O'Callaghan <[email protected]> burbled
news:[email protected]:

[q1]> M_RUDKY wrote:[/q1]
[q2]>>[/q2]
[q2]>> What is the mistake in following sentence[/q2]
[q2]>>[/q2]
[q2]>> Neither of us are living off campus this semester because the rents were too high[/q2]
[q1]>[/q1]
[q1]> I would say: "Neither of us is living off-campus this year because the rents are too high."[/q1]
[q1]> "neither of us" is a singular subject (one person), and the rent problem is probably also current.[/q1]
[q1]> But, of course, the latter may refer to the fact that a fixed term lease had to be agreed and at[/q1]
[q1]> the time we were looking the rents were too high although they may now be lower.[/q1]
[q1]>[/q1]
[q1]> If this is a test question it's a bad one because it asks for one mistake but there are[/q1]
[q1]> potentially two (unless you have further context). Grammatical test questions of this sort should[/q1]
[q1]> always have one (and only one) potentially correct solution.[/q1]
[q1]>[/q1]

There's only mistake in this sentence, the subject verb-agreement problem, not the semantic one
about rents.

--
Franke: Grammar 1: Internalized rules for the spoken language. Grammar 2: Formal rules for the
written language. Grammar 1 does not equal Grammar 2.
Einde O'Callagh
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CyberCypher wrote:
[q1]>[/q1]
[q1]> Einde O'Callaghan <[email protected]> burbled[/q1]
[q1]> news:[email protected]:[/q1]
[q1]>[/q1]
[q2]> > M_RUDKY wrote:[/q2]
[q2]> >>[/q2]
[q2]> >> What is the mistake in following sentence[/q2]
[q2]> >>[/q2]
[q2]> >> Neither of us are living off campus this semester because the rents were too high[/q2]
[q2]> >[/q2]
[q2]> > I would say: "Neither of us is living off-campus this year because the rents are too high."[/q2]
[q2]> > "neither of us" is a singular subject (one person), and the rent problem is probably also[/q2]
[q2]> > current. But, of course, the latter may refer to the fact that a fixed term lease had to be[/q2]
[q2]> > agreed and at the time we were looking the rents were too high although they may now be lower.[/q2]
[q2]> >[/q2]
[q2]> > If this is a test question it's a bad one because it asks for one mistake but there are[/q2]
[q2]> > potentially two (unless you have further context). Grammatical test questions of this sort[/q2]
[q2]> > should always have one (and only one) potentially correct solution.[/q2]
[q2]> >[/q2]
[q1]>[/q1]
[q1]> There's only mistake in this sentence, the subject verb-agreement problem, not the semantic one[/q1]
[q1]> about rents.[/q1]
[q1]>[/q1]
That was my first thought, but the more I read the sentence the more "disturbed" I became about the
past tense in the second part - but as you say it's a semantic question and not a grammatical one.

Regards, einde O'Callaghan
M_rudky
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Thank CyberCypher and Einde O'Callaghan very much for your replies.

The question i have given is in the Book: KAPLAN TOEFL CBT EXAM. They request that we choose which
part of the sentence is incorrect in formal English.

"Neither of us are living off campus this semester because the rents were too high"

a> of us
b>are
c>off campus
d>were

And the sollution given in the book is a>

I don't understand what is wrong with a>, and that is why i come and ask you all.

Please help me, Thank.

Einde O'Callaghan <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:<[email protected]>...
[q1]> CyberCypher wrote:[/q1]
[q2]> >[/q2]
[q2]> > Einde O'Callaghan <[email protected]> burbled[/q2]
[q2]> > news:[email protected]:[/q2]
[q2]> >[/q2]
[q3]> > > M_RUDKY wrote:[/q3]
[q3]> > >>[/q3]
[q3]> > >> What is the mistake in following sentence[/q3]
[q3]> > >>[/q3]
[q3]> > >> Neither of us are living off campus this semester because the rents were too high[/q3]
[q3]> > >[/q3]
[q3]> > > I would say: "Neither of us is living off-campus this year because the rents are too high."[/q3]
[q3]> > > "neither of us" is a singular subject (one person), and the rent problem is probably also[/q3]
[q3]> > > current. But, of course, the latter may refer to the fact that a fixed term lease had to be[/q3]
[q3]> > > agreed and at the time we were looking the rents were too high although they may now be lower.[/q3]
[q3]> > >[/q3]
[q3]> > > If this is a test question it's a bad one because it asks for one mistake but there are[/q3]
[q3]> > > potentially two (unless you have further context). Grammatical test questions of this sort[/q3]
[q3]> > > should always have one (and only one) potentially correct solution.[/q3]
[q3]> > >[/q3]
[q2]> >[/q2]
[q2]> > There's only mistake in this sentence, the subject verb-agreement problem, not the semantic one[/q2]
[q2]> > about rents.[/q2]
[q2]> >[/q2]
[q1]> That was my first thought, but the more I read the sentence the more "disturbed" I became about[/q1]
[q1]> the past tense in the second part - but as you say it's a semantic question and not a[/q1]
[q1]> grammatical one.[/q1]
[q1]>[/q1]
[q1]> Regards, einde O'Callaghan[/q1]
Cybercypher
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[email protected] (M_RUDKY) burbled news:[email protected]:

[q1]> Thank CyberCypher and Einde O'Callaghan very much for your replies.[/q1]
[q1]>[/q1]
[q1]> The question i have given is in the Book: KAPLAN TOEFL CBT EXAM. They request that we choose which[/q1]
[q1]> part of the sentence is incorrect in formal English.[/q1]
[q1]>[/q1]
[q1]> "Neither of us are living off campus this semester because the rents were too high"[/q1]
[q1]>[/q1]
[q1]> a> of us[/q1]
[q1]> b>are[/q1]
[q1]> c>off campus[/q1]
[q1]> d>were[/q1]
[q1]>[/q1]
[q1]> And the sollution given in the book is a>[/q1]
[q1]>[/q1]
[q1]> I don't understand what is wrong with a>, and that is why i come and ask you all.[/q1]

This is just a misprint. THere is nothing wrong with "Neither of us"; it cannot be *"Neither of we".
The only possible answer to this question is "b", because it *must* be "is" and not "are". This kind
of thing happens with these books. They are not properly proofread.

--
Franke: Grammar 1: Internalized rules for the spoken language. Grammar 2: Formal rules for the
written language. Grammar 1 does not equal Grammar 2.
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