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    When I run a spell-checker program on my document, I start doubting lots or things I wrote. In
    particular, the checker find some words which it finds "suspicious". As English is not my mother
    tongue, I do not know what to do.

    I would like your help in deciding which of these should be written with a hyphen and which don't,
    and which should be the "rule" (if one exists):

    - pre-computation(s)
    - photo-receptors or photoreceptors
    - under-sampling or ...
    - over-sampling
    - co-exist
    - ego-motion
    - sub-pixel
    - re-mapping

    Can, in general, be considered both versions (with or without hyphen) correct?

    Thanks a lot!

    Javier

    Javier Traver <[email protected]> burbled news:[email protected]:

    [q1]> When I run a spell-checker program on my document, I start doubting lots or things I wrote. In[/q1]
    [q1]> particular, the checker find some words which it finds "suspicious". As English is not my mother[/q1]
    [q1]> tongue, I do not know what to do.[/q1]
    [q1]>[/q1]
    [q1]> I would like your help in deciding which of these should be written with a hyphen and which don't,[/q1]
    [q1]> and which should be the "rule" (if one exists):[/q1]
    [q1]>[/q1]
    [q1]> - pre-computation(s)[/q1]
    [q1]> - photo-receptors or photoreceptors[/q1]
    [q1]> - under-sampling or ...[/q1]
    [q1]> - over-sampling[/q1]
    [q1]> - co-exist[/q1]
    [q1]> - ego-motion[/q1]
    [q1]> - sub-pixel[/q1]
    [q1]> - re-mapping[/q1]
    [q1]>[/q1]
    [q1]> Can, in general, be considered both versions (with or without hyphen) correct?[/q1]

    Correct for whom? If you are using these words in a paper for a university course, then you
    undoubtedly have a professor who knows how he or she wants them spelled. Ask your professor. You
    should be able to find them in course books, shouldn't you? Check to see how those books spell these
    words. These words ought to be in a variety of computer, audio, and graphics glossaries and
    dictionaries available on the web and probably in your school library. They will certainly be
    available in articles published on the web. And if you are doing this professionally, buy a couple
    of good general and technical dictionaries. Learn how to use a dictionary, please.

    --
    Franke: Grammar 1: Internalized rules for the spoken language. Grammar 2: Formal rules for the
    written language. Grammar 1 does not equal Grammar 2.

    That is right, I totally agree with CyberCypher. The best solution is your looking up in the
    dictionary. Regards

    Rudky

    CyberCypher <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected] 30.133.1.4>...
    [q1]> Javier Traver <[email protected]> burbled news:[email protected]:[/q1]
    [q1]>[/q1]
    [q2]> > When I run a spell-checker program on my document, I start doubting lots or things I wrote. In[/q2]
    [q2]> > particular, the checker find some words which it finds "suspicious". As English is not my mother[/q2]
    [q2]> > tongue, I do not know what to do.[/q2]
    [q2]> >[/q2]
    [q2]> > I would like your help in deciding which of these should be written with a hyphen and which[/q2]
    [q2]> > don't, and which should be the "rule" (if one exists):[/q2]
    [q2]> >[/q2]
    [q2]> > - pre-computation(s)[/q2]
    [q2]> > - photo-receptors or photoreceptors[/q2]
    [q2]> > - under-sampling or ...[/q2]
    [q2]> > - over-sampling[/q2]
    [q2]> > - co-exist[/q2]
    [q2]> > - ego-motion[/q2]
    [q2]> > - sub-pixel[/q2]
    [q2]> > - re-mapping[/q2]
    [q2]> >[/q2]
    [q2]> > Can, in general, be considered both versions (with or without hyphen) correct?[/q2]
    [q1]>[/q1]
    [q1]> Correct for whom? If you are using these words in a paper for a university course, then you[/q1]
    [q1]> undoubtedly have a professor who knows how he or she wants them spelled. Ask your professor. You[/q1]
    [q1]> should be able to find them in course books, shouldn't you? Check to see how those books spell[/q1]
    [q1]> these words. These words ought to be in a variety of computer, audio, and graphics glossaries and[/q1]
    [q1]> dictionaries available on the web and probably in your school library. They will certainly be[/q1]
    [q1]> available in articles published on the web. And if you are doing this professionally, buy a couple[/q1]
    [q1]> of good general and technical dictionaries. Learn how to use a dictionary, please.[/q1]
 
 
 
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