Sources of law?

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xmarilynx
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Sorry if this is in the wrong section mods, wasn't sure where to put it.

I've started work experience today and for tomorrow my boss wants me to know four or five 'sources of law'. Maybe I'm being thick, but I'm not even sure what this means! What is a source of law, and what are the four or five that he means?!
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caw123
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Statutes, circulars, precedents. For a start.
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a_t
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4 or 5 sources? Basically where law comes from I imagine

So the main ones would be

Statute (obviously)
Common Law (this is previous decisions in cases)
EU Law (Conventions etc)
Human Rights Law
International Law (Basically treaties we as a country have signed up to etc)

Obviously some of these areas overlap
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eve_22
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I am no expert myself, but I would go with common/case law, legislation, European Community (EU) Law, European Convention on Human Rights and equity.
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vickiii
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In Scotland anyway: precedent, statute, convention, institutional writers, custom, principles of equity
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L i b
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Question: do they have institutional writers in England and Wales?

(Original post by eve_22)
European Convention on Human Rights
Ah, but that's only because it's incorporated by statute.
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eve_22
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(Original post by L i b)

Ah, but that's only because it's incorporated by statute.
You mean by way of Human Rights Act 1998?


"The European Convention on Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms is a treaty signed in 1950 by the then members of the Council of Europe. In this way, it predates the Euopean Communities and Union and arises from a quite different organisation. The two are linked, however, in that adherence to the Convention is now effectively a condition of membership of the EU. Additionally, the European Court of Justice refers to the Convention which influences its decisions, even though the EU is not a member of the Convention. Note that the European Court of Human Rights (described below) is not the same as the European Court of Justice. The judges are different and one sits in Starsbourg, the other on Luxembourg.


The UK was a founding member of the Convention and was very influential in its design. It was amongst the first states to ratify the treaty. It has allowed individuals to make complaints to the European Commission on Human Rights since 1966.

Source here
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L i b
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(Original post by eve_22)
You mean by way of Human Rights Act 1998?


"The European Convention on Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms is a treaty signed in 1950 by the then members of the Council of Europe. In this way, it predates the Euopean Communities and Union and arises from a quite different organisation. The two are linked, however, in that adherence to the Convention is now effectively a condition of membership of the EU. Additionally, the European Court of Justice refers to the Convention which influences its decisions, even though the EU is not a member of the Convention. Note that the European Court of Human Rights (described below) is not the same as the European Court of Justice. The judges are different and one sits in Starsbourg, the other on Luxembourg.


The UK was a founding member of the Convention and was very influential in its design. It was amongst the first states to ratify the treaty. It has allowed individuals to make complaints to the European Commission on Human Rights since 1966.

Source here
Well, they had recourse to the European Court of Human Rights before 1998, but it didn't actually affect UK law except for the general preference for interpreting the law in line with the UK's international obligations.

The ECtHR didn't change the law or have any influence over it, all it could do is award damages, which the states were then at liberty to pay or not.
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Ethereal
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the ECHR isn't a source of law in and of itself eve, it is an example of a source of law - ie a treaty ie international law. lib is right.
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Ethereal
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The prerogative, on a strict reading, is not a source of law...

(Original post by proclamations case;undefined)
the King hath no prerogative but that which the law of the land allows him
It was found in the Proclamations case that the prerogative does not have the power to change the common law.
Last edited by RK; 9 months ago
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eve_22
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(Original post by Ethereal)
the ECHR isn't a source of law in and of itself eve, it is an example of a source of law - ie a treaty ie international law. lib is right.

Thank you.
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xmarilynx
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Thanks for your help guys
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