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Tyc Tac
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What are other schools policy regarding wearing ear rings at school ? One parent has threatened
referral to the European court of Human Rights for making their child remove large punk type ear
rings in class. Any views ?
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Clark
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Tyc Tac wrote:
[q1]>[/q1]
[q1]> What are other schools policy regarding wearing ear rings at school ? One parent has threatened[/q1]
[q1]> referral to the European court of Human Rights for making their child remove large punk type ear[/q1]
[q1]> rings in class. Any views ?[/q1]

Unfortunately, the European Court doesn't take direct referrals like that. I say 'unfortunately'
because I'm sure there are people there who could do with a good laugh. Human rights? Children
wearing earrings? Huh? If you know the parent concerned, the best you can do is tell him/her to get
a grip and not be so stupid.

It may well be a bit silly for a school to insist on 'no earrings'. I think it probably *is* a bit
daft, really. But the stupidity of a parent who backs a child against his/her school on such a silly
thing is on a different plane entirely.

That's my view, fwiw.

Bob
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John Hill
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On Wed, 26 Jun 2002 13:13:51 GMT, [email protected] (Tyc Tac) wrote:

[q1]>What are other schools policy regarding wearing ear rings at school ? One parent has threatened[/q1]
[q1]>referral to the European court of Human Rights for making their child remove large punk type ear[/q1]
[q1]>rings in class. Any views ?[/q1]

Offer the parent the option of parental choice. With Genes like that the child will do nothing at
all for your "performance" figures

JH
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Martyn Reason
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John Hill wrote:
[q1]>[/q1]
[q1]> On Wed, 26 Jun 2002 13:13:51 GMT, [email protected] (Tyc Tac) wrote:[/q1]
[q1]>[/q1]
[q2]> >What are other schools policy regarding wearing ear rings at school ? One parent has threatened[/q2]
[q2]> >referral to the European court of Human Rights for making their child remove large punk type ear[/q2]
[q2]> >rings in class. Any views ?[/q2]
[q1]>[/q1]
[q1]> Offer the parent the option of parental choice. With Genes like that the child will do nothing at[/q1]
[q1]> all for your "performance" figures[/q1]
[q1]>[/q1]
[q1]> JH[/q1]

You could argue that this is a health and safety matter, and as such, it (might) not be a human
rights issue. The argument is that if a child wears large/small ring earrings and the child tears
their ear lobe off, just who are the parents going to sue? If the school communicates this, and the
reasons for the stance, is can then be seen to be sensible about this issue, and you have mitigated
any liability (notwithstanding a possible negligence aspect).

Unfortunately, the counter argument to this is that the incidence of ear-lobe-tearing accidents is
probably small, and what are we worrying about?

Martyn
--
Martyn Reason

- The views/information contained here do not necessarily reflect those of my employer.
- I respectfully reserve the right to be wrong.
- Any errors or omissions are a fault of the transmission medium (either that or you are thinking
bad thoughts).
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User1951
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On Wed, 26 Jun 2002 15:58:27 +0200, Clark <[email protected]> wrote:

[q1]>Rights for making their child remove large punk type ear rings in[/q1]
[q2]>> class. Any views ?[/q2]

Ah yes but they *were* removed with a pair of red-hot pliers.

----------------------------------
http://user1951.tripod.com Education, film, Lara Croft, Shakespeare texts and the museum of
old jokes.
-----------------------------------

******************************** ********
http://user1951.tripod.com Education Education Education
******************************** *********
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John Hill
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On Wed, 26 Jun 2002 15:29:05 +0100, Martyn Reason <[email protected]> wrote:

[q2]>>[/q2]
[q2]>> >What are other schools policy regarding wearing ear rings at school ? One parent has threatened[/q2]
[q2]>> >referral to the European court of Human Rights for making their child remove large punk type ear[/q2]
[q2]>> >rings in class. Any views ?[/q2]
[q2]>>[/q2]
[q2]>> Offer the parent the option of parental choice. With Genes like that the child will do nothing at[/q2]
[q2]>> all for your "performance" figures[/q2]
[q2]>>[/q2]
[q2]>> JH[/q2]
[q1]>[/q1]
[q1]>You could argue that this is a health and safety matter, and as such, it (might) not be a human[/q1]
[q1]>rights issue. The argument is that if a child wears large/small ring earrings and the child tears[/q1]
[q1]>their ear lobe off, just who are the parents going to sue? If the school communicates this, and the[/q1]
[q1]>reasons for the stance, is can then be seen to be sensible about this issue, and you have mitigated[/q1]
[q1]>any liability (notwithstanding a possible negligence aspect).[/q1]
[q1]>[/q1]
[q1]>Unfortunately, the counter argument to this is that the incidence of ear-lobe-tearing accidents is[/q1]
[q1]>probably small, and what are we worrying about?[/q1]
[q1]>[/q1]
[q1]>Martyn[/q1]
[q1]>--[/q1]
[q1]>Martyn Reason[/q1]

<sense of humour> Offer the parent the option of parental choice. With Genes like that the child
will do nothing at all for your "performance" figures <sense of humour>

The H&S issue is assumed; the reaction of the parent is somewhat OTT. This makes it a little
risible. The basis of the humour is that someone who is so ridiculous about this is also likely to
be lacking in the pragmatic skills needed to be an examination success. Therefore it is suggested
that the child might adversely effect the schools results.

The explanation above is also intended to be mildly humorous

JH
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Andy.Garner2
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It IS an H&S issue. The parent must comply or remove the child from the school, or else make a
compromise in which her child would not be permitted into PE, Drama and other subjects where
dangly bits of decor are a liability, AND would not be permitted to use corridors etc at times of
mass movement!

Parent might be encouraged to use rectal storage area for said earings!!

"John Hill" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]...
[q1]> On Wed, 26 Jun 2002 15:29:05 +0100, Martyn Reason <[email protected]> wrote:[/q1]
[q1]>[/q1]
[q2]> >>[/q2]
[q2]> >> >What are other schools policy regarding wearing ear rings at school ? One parent has[/q2]
[q2]> >> >threatened referral to the European court of Human Rights for making their child remove large[/q2]
[q2]> >> >punk type ear rings in class. Any views ?[/q2]
[q2]> >>[/q2]
[q2]> >> Offer the parent the option of parental choice. With Genes like that the child will do nothing[/q2]
[q2]> >> at all for your "performance" figures[/q2]
[q2]> >>[/q2]
[q2]> >> JH[/q2]
[q2]> >[/q2]
[q2]> >You could argue that this is a health and safety matter, and as such, it (might) not be a human[/q2]
[q2]> >rights issue. The argument is that if a child wears large/small ring earrings and the child tears[/q2]
[q2]> >their ear lobe off, just who are the parents going to sue? If the school communicates this, and[/q2]
[q2]> >the reasons for the stance, is can then be seen to be sensible about this issue, and you have[/q2]
[q2]> >mitigated any liability (notwithstanding a possible negligence aspect).[/q2]
[q2]> >[/q2]
[q2]> >Unfortunately, the counter argument to this is that the incidence of ear-lobe-tearing accidents[/q2]
[q2]> >is probably small, and what are we worrying about?[/q2]
[q2]> >[/q2]
[q2]> >Martyn[/q2]
[q2]> >--[/q2]
[q2]> >Martyn Reason[/q2]
[q1]>[/q1]
[q1]> <sense of humour> Offer the parent the option of parental choice. With Genes like that the child[/q1]
[q1]> will do nothing at all for your "performance" figures <sense of humour>[/q1]
[q1]>[/q1]
[q1]> The H&S issue is assumed; the reaction of the parent is somewhat OTT. This makes it a little[/q1]
[q1]> risible. The basis of the humour is that someone who is so ridiculous about this is also likely to[/q1]
[q1]> be lacking in the pragmatic skills needed to be an examination success. Therefore it is suggested[/q1]
[q1]> that the child might adversely effect the schools results.[/q1]
[q1]>[/q1]
[q1]> The explanation above is also intended to be mildly humorous[/q1]
[q1]>[/q1]
[q1]> JH[/q1]
0
Sheila :-D
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[email protected] (Tyc Tac) burbled:

[q1]>What are other schools policy regarding wearing ear rings at school ? One parent has threatened[/q1]
[q1]>referral to the European court of Human Rights for making their child remove large punk type ear[/q1]
[q1]>rings in class. Any views ?[/q1]

Our LEA has banned them, so are probably correct legally.
--
Sheila :-D (Remove e to mail.)
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Slieber24
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In article <[email protected] t.co.uk>, [email protected] (Tyc Tac) writes:

[q1]>What are other schools policy regarding wearing ear rings at school ? One parent has threatened[/q1]
[q1]>referral to the European court of Human Rights for making their child remove large punk type ear[/q1]
[q1]>rings in class. Any views ?[/q1]

Studs only - safety reasons. And the must be removed for PE.

----------------------------------------------------
Sandi

Remove NoSpam to reply.
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She Who Would L
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In article <[email protected] t.co.uk>, Tyc Tac of uttered
[q1]>What are other schools policy regarding wearing ear rings at school ? One parent has threatened[/q1]
[q1]>referral to the European court of Human Rights for making their child remove large punk type ear[/q1]
[q1]>rings in class. Any views ?[/q1]

Yep. Personally, I view any earrings as a potential hazard for snagging/ pulling during the
rough-and-tumble of a normal school day - the larger the earring, the greater the hazard, although
this *should* diminish towards the end of KS3.

And before anyone complains about my unsympathetic view - have they ever actually had a hoop earring
wrenched hard enough to make their earlobe bleed?
--
AJH
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Martyn Reason
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SLieber24 wrote:
[q1]>[/q1]
[q1]> In article <[email protected]> , Martyn Reason <[email protected]> writes:[/q1]
[q1]>[/q1]
[q2]> >> Offer the parent the option of parental choice. With Genes like that the child will do nothing[/q2]
[q2]> >> at all for your "performance" figures[/q2]
[q2]> >>[/q2]
[q2]> >> JH[/q2]
[q2]> >[/q2]
[q2]> >You could argue that this is a health and safety matter, and as such, it snip[/q2]
[q2]> >[/q2]
[q2]> >Unfortunately, the counter argument to this is that the incidence of ear-lobe-tearing accidents[/q2]
[q2]> >is probably small, and what are we worrying about?[/q2]
[q2]> >[/q2]
[q1]>[/q1]
[q1]> Um....I beg to differ. Perhaps the incidents are small, but I regularly accidentally catch my own[/q1]
[q1]> fingers in my very small ring earrings. :-([/q1]
[q1]>[/q1]
[q1]> Sandi[/q1]

Ouch! Even more reason to 'ban' hooped earrings.

Martyn
--
Martyn Reason [email protected]

- The views/information contained here do not necessarily reflect those of my employer.
- I respectfully reserve the right to be wrong.
- Any errors or omissions are a fault of the transmission medium (either that or you are thinking
bad thoughts).
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Bob Spowart
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Martyn Reason wrote in message <[email protected]> ... <SNIP>>
[q1]>Unfortunately, the counter argument to this is that the incidence of ear-lobe-tearing accidents is[/q1]
[q1]>probably small, and what are we worrying about?[/q1]
[q1]>[/q1]
I've seen two in one year. Perhaps not as rare as you think.
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jonkurta
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well this depends on your reasons - is it Health and Safety, in which case you ought to get
Governors / LEA backing or is it because you don't like the fashion or what you perceive the fashion
to represent?

n Wed, 26 Jun 2002 13:13:51 GMT, [email protected] (Tyc Tac) wrote:

[q1]>What are other schools policy regarding wearing ear rings at school ? One parent has threatened[/q1]
[q1]>referral to the European court of Human Rights for making their child remove large punk type ear[/q1]
[q1]>rings in class. Any views ?[/q1]
0
Mark.Norwood
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"andy.garner2" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]...
[q1]> It IS an H&S issue. The parent must comply or remove the child from the school, or else make a[/q1]
[q1]> compromise in which her child would not be[/q1]
permitted
[q1]> into PE, Drama and other subjects where dangly bits of decor are a liability, AND would not be[/q1]
[q1]> permitted to use corridors etc at times of[/q1]
mass
[q1]> movement![/q1]

I positively encourage students expressing themselves through what they wear.

In my drama lessons I have no problem with students wearing all manner of earrings, noserings,
chains, spiked dog collars etc!

Some teachers need to be a bit less anal!

--
mvn
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Eddie Newall
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"Tyc Tac" wrote:
[q1]> What are other schools policy regarding wearing ear rings at school ? One parent has threatened[/q1]
[q1]> referral to the European court of Human Rights for making their child remove large punk type ear[/q1]
[q1]> rings in class. Any views ?[/q1]

Apart from the health & safety issue, speaking as a parent, in my view schools ought to have a dress
code for other reasons too. Assuming this young lady and all her peers will want to earn a living at
some stage then in many jobs employers are very fussy about what their employees wear at work, and
in some cases when not at work! (Corporate 'image'.) In many jobs jewellery or certain clothing
styles cannot be worn for safety or other reasons reasons and uniform or personal protective
equipment has to be worn for safety or hygiene reasons.

I thought that one purpose of education was to prepare children for the adult world and the world of
work. I think this is called socialisation. If it is then surely they need to appreciate that there
are boundaries on this issue. Feedback welcomed.
--
Eddie Newall http://www.freeinformationcentre.co.uk
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Tyc Tac
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The parents reasoning was more to do that if constantly removing the earring at the beginninng and
ending of the school day caused damage or inefection then the school were responsible. Ridiculous
as the threat may seem I thought it sensible to seek others opinion. That I certainly have got.
Many thanks.

And Lo, it came to pass that on Wed, 26 Jun 2002 20:09:01 +0000 (UTC)
[email protected] scribed :

[q1]>well this depends on your reasons - is it Health and Safety, in which case you ought to get[/q1]
[q1]>Governors / LEA backing or is it because you don't like the fashion or what you perceive the[/q1]
[q1]>fashion to represent?[/q1]
[q1]>[/q1]
[q1]>[/q1]
[q1]>[/q1]
[q1]>n Wed, 26 Jun 2002 13:13:51 GMT, [email protected] (Tyc Tac) wrote:[/q1]
[q1]>[/q1]
[q2]>>What are other schools policy regarding wearing ear rings at school ? One parent has threatened[/q2]
[q2]>>referral to the European court of Human Rights for making their child remove large punk type ear[/q2]
[q2]>>rings in class. Any views ?[/q2]
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Robert
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On Thu, 27 Jun 2002 16:55:14 +0100, "mark.norwood" <[email protected]> wrote:

[q1]>I positively encourage students expressing themselves through what they wear.[/q1]
[q1]>[/q1]
[q1]>In my drama lessons I have no problem with students wearing all manner of earrings, noserings,[/q1]
[q1]>chains, spiked dog collars etc![/q1]
[q1]>[/q1]
[q1]>Some teachers need to be a bit less anal![/q1]
[q1]>[/q1]
[q1]>--[/q1]
[q1]>mvn[/q1]

But in the serious subjects different standards apply. Many teachers like to set standards in their
class and are not prepared to lower them in the interests of current fashion.
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Clark
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Robert wrote:
[q1]>[/q1]
[q1]> On Thu, 27 Jun 2002 16:55:14 +0100, "mark.norwood" <[email protected]> wrote:[/q1]
[q1]>[/q1]
[q2]> >I positively encourage students expressing themselves through what they wear.[/q2]
[q2]> >[/q2]
[q2]> >In my drama lessons I have no problem with students wearing all manner of earrings, noserings,[/q2]
[q2]> >chains, spiked dog collars etc![/q2]
[q2]> >[/q2]
[q2]> >Some teachers need to be a bit less anal![/q2]
[q2]> >[/q2]
[q2]> >--[/q2]
[q2]> >mvn[/q2]
[q1]>[/q1]
[q1]> But in the serious subjects different standards apply. Many teachers like to set standards in[/q1]
[q1]> their class and are not prepared to lower them in the interests of current fashion.[/q1]

I teach serious subjects. The standards I'm interested in have to do with the subjects I teach, not
with jewellery or clothing that may or may not be fashionable. Thinking that dress and appearance
are associated with academic standards is part of a fashion of thought which is difficult to
reconcile with the kind of standards I'm interested in, I'm afraid.

(But I still think that if your child's school bans earrings you probably ought to just shut up and
take your child's earrings off. If the holes in his/her ears then close up, well, so much the
better. What's so good about poking holes in a child's ear anyway? That's nothing to do with
educational standards, however.)

Bob
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Mark.Norwood
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"Robert" <[email protected] uk> wrote in message

[q1]> But in the serious subjects different standards apply. Many teachers like to set standards in[/q1]
[q1]> their class and are not prepared to lower them in the interests of current fashion.[/q1]

I'm certain my standards are just as high as yours or any other teacher.

BTW Drama is *the* most serious and important subject on the curriculum. Much, much more important
than several of the so-called academic subjects.
--
mvn
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Michael Saunby
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"Clark" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
[q1]>[/q1]
[q1]>[/q1]
[q1]> I teach serious subjects. The standards I'm interested in have to do with the subjects I teach,[/q1]
[q1]> not with jewellery or clothing that may or may not be fashionable. Thinking that dress and[/q1]
[q1]> appearance are associated with academic standards is part of a fashion of thought which is[/q1]
[q1]> difficult to reconcile with the kind of standards I'm interested in, I'm afraid.[/q1]
[q1]>[/q1]
[q1]> (But I still think that if your child's school bans earrings you probably ought to just shut up[/q1]
[q1]> and take your child's earrings off. If the holes in his/her ears then close up, well, so much the[/q1]
[q1]> better. What's so good about poking holes in a child's ear anyway? That's nothing to do with[/q1]
[q1]> educational standards, however.)[/q1]

Yes it does have to do with educational standards; it just doesn't have anything to do with academic
standards.

Education has a moral dimension too. Well at least it used to.

Michael Saunby
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