Are county names singular or plural ? Watch

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Jack
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Brazil is going to win this worldcup. They(It) will beat Geramny on Sunday.

I have never seen anybody use "it" in that context. So , are countries and Sports teams name both
singular and plural?
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Einde O'Callagh
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Jack wrote:
[q1]>[/q1]
[q1]> Brazil is going to win this worldcup. They(It) will beat Geramny on Sunday.[/q1]
[q1]>[/q1]
[q1]> I have never seen anybody use "it" in that context. So , are countries and Sports teams name both[/q1]
[q1]> singular and plural?[/q1]

We often refer back to collectives using "they" even if the collective itself is singular. "Brazil"
here refers to the Brazilian football team, a collective, and not to the country itself. Country
names are singular, even when they have a plural form, e.g. "The United States is a big country".

Regards, Einde O'Callaghan
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Howie
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On Thu, 27 Jun 2002 07:02:32 GMT, "Jack" <[email protected]> wrote:

[q1]|Brazil is going to win this worldcup. They(It) will beat Geramny on Sunday.[/q1]
[q1]|[/q1]
[q1]|I have never seen anybody use "it" in that context. So , are countries and |Sports teams name both[/q1]
singular and plural?
[q1]|[/q1]
The (it) above is not correct. But, yes, in the respect that a country can be an entity in itself,
and also a 'team' of people. The nation of people can be considered as the country. I suppose the
football team is actually a representation of the country in a specific sport.

So: The country of Brazil [Brazil] is going to win this world cup. Their team [They] will beat
Germany on Sunday.

And I hope they will too. ;-)

H.

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Cybercypher
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"Jack" <[email protected]> burbled news:[email protected]:

[q1]> Brazil is going to win this worldcup. They(It) will beat Geramny on Sunday.[/q1]
[q1]>[/q1]
[q1]> I have never seen anybody use "it" in that context. So , are countries and Sports teams name both[/q1]
[q1]> singular and plural?[/q1]

This is one of those stylistic choices, but I think it's wrong here. "Brazil" is the name of the
team as well as the name of the country. The team can be referred to in either the singular or the
plural, but the country can be referred to only in the singular.

It is perfectly grammatical and normal American English to say "Brazil is going to beat Germany". It
is perfectly normal and grammatical British English to say "Brazil are going to beat Germany". You
can also refer to a team as "it" in AmE: "This Brazil team is both strong and experienced. It has
the best World Cup record and it will be more aggressive than Germany in the final game". [Please
don't think about the truth or falsity of the content of the sentences I just wrote. I know nothing
about the sport and am merely illustrating the grammatical possibilities.]

--
Franke: "Life is simple: pain is good, pleasure is better, no pain is best. Death is even simpler."
Bodhisattva F. A. Tchirl. Grammar 1: Internalized rules for the spoken language. Grammar 2: Formal
rules for the written language. Grammar 1 does not equal Grammar 2.
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Jack
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Brazil are going to beat Germany? Wouldnt that be a subject-verb agreement error? Btw, if a sport
team can be both singular and plural, when I use that name in the essay, I should keep the word
constant rignt? (As in referring to the team as a singular noun in the rest of the composition)

"CyberCypher" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
[q1]> "Jack" <[email protected]> burbled news:[email protected]:[/q1]
[q1]>[/q1]
[q2]> > Brazil is going to win this worldcup. They(It) will beat Geramny on Sunday.[/q2]
[q2]> >[/q2]
[q2]> > I have never seen anybody use "it" in that context. So , are countries and Sports teams name[/q2]
[q2]> > both singular and plural?[/q2]
[q1]>[/q1]
[q1]> This is one of those stylistic choices, but I think it's wrong here. "Brazil" is the name of the[/q1]
[q1]> team as well as the name of the country. The team can be referred to in either the singular or the[/q1]
[q1]> plural, but the country can be referred to only in the singular.[/q1]
[q1]>[/q1]
[q1]> It is perfectly grammatical and normal American English to say "Brazil is going to beat Germany".[/q1]
[q1]> It is perfectly normal and grammatical British English to say "Brazil are going to beat Germany".[/q1]
[q1]> You can also refer to a team as "it" in AmE: "This Brazil team is both strong and experienced. It[/q1]
[q1]> has the best World Cup record and it will be more aggressive than Germany in the final game".[/q1]
[q1]> [Please don't think about the truth or falsity of the content of the sentences I just wrote. I[/q1]
[q1]> know nothing about the sport and am merely illustrating the grammatical possibilities.][/q1]
[q1]>[/q1]
[q1]> --[/q1]
[q1]> Franke: "Life is simple: pain is good, pleasure is better, no pain is best. Death is even[/q1]
[q1]> simpler." Bodhisattva F. A. Tchirl. Grammar 1: Internalized rules for the spoken language. Grammar[/q1]
[q1]> 2: Formal rules for the written language. Grammar 1 does not equal Grammar 2.[/q1]
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Cybercypher
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"Jack" <[email protected]> burbled news:[email protected]:

[q1]> "CyberCypher" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...[/q1]
[q2]>> "Jack" <[email protected]> burbled news:[email protected]:[/q2]
[q2]>>[/q2]
[q2]>> > Brazil is going to win this worldcup. They(It) will beat Geramny on Sunday.[/q2]
[q2]>> >[/q2]
[q2]>> > I have never seen anybody use "it" in that context. So , are countries and Sports teams name[/q2]
[q2]>> > both singular and plural?[/q2]
[q2]>>[/q2]
[q2]>> This is one of those stylistic choices, but I think it's wrong here. "Brazil" is the name of the[/q2]
[q2]>> team as well as the name of the country. The team can be referred to in either the singular or[/q2]
[q2]>> the plural, but the country can be referred to only in the singular.[/q2]
[q2]>>[/q2]
[q2]>> It is perfectly grammatical and normal American English to say "Brazil is going to beat Germany".[/q2]
[q2]>> It is perfectly normal and grammatical British English to say "Brazil are going to beat Germany".[/q2]
[q2]>> You can also refer to a team as "it" in AmE: "This Brazil team is both strong and experienced. It[/q2]
[q2]>> has the best World Cup record and it will be more aggressive than Germany in the final game".[/q2]
[q2]>> [Please don't think about the truth or falsity of the content of the sentences I just wrote. I[/q2]
[q2]>> know nothing about the sport and am merely illustrating the grammatical possibilities.][/q2]

[q1]> Brazil are going to beat Germany? Wouldnt that be a subject-verb agreement error?[/q1]

If you ask speakers of British English, most of them will probably tell you that they think of a
football team as a collection of individuals and use the plural form. Speakers of American English,
on the other hand, tend to view a soccer team as a unit and so use the singular form. Either one is
fine, so it's not really a subject-verb agreement error; it's merely a difference between dialects.
I'm an EFL teacher in Taiwan, so I would not care which form you used as long as you were
consistent. If I were an American English teacher teaching you in America, I would probably insist
that you use the singular, just as if I were a British English teacher in the UK, I would probably
insist that you use the plural form.

[q1]> Btw, if a sport team can be both singular and plural, when I use that name in the essay, I should[/q1]
[q1]> keep the word constant rignt? (As in referring to the team as a singular noun in the rest of the[/q1]
[q1]> composition)[/q1]

Yes, consistency is the key word here. It would probably be best if you used all British English
grammar, spelling, and idioms or all American English grammar, spelling, and idioms. Whether you
choose British or American English is of no moment, but I would suggest that you use the English
most common in your environment. It appears that you are living in Canada, and that dialect of
English has its own peculiarities. John Ings and John Ramsey, both living in Canada, I believe, and
both of whom post to this NG, would be the two people to ask for guidance about what the norm in
Canadian English is.

--
Franke: "Life is simple: pain is good, pleasure is better, no pain is best. Death is even simpler."
Bodhisattva F. A. Tchirl. Grammar 1: Internalized rules for the spoken language. Grammar 2: Formal
rules for the written language. Grammar 1 does not equal Grammar 2.
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