University Marking System - Is This True?

Watch
This discussion is closed.
viviki
Badges: 14
Rep:
?
#21
Report 17 years ago
#21
I think its worse. When I look back on my GCSE and A Levels i can appreciate how easy they were in comparison with my degree. But looking back on my degree now I'm doing my postgrad, yes the postgrad is more work but I still see my degree as being really hard.
0
hotnanoo
Badges: 6
Rep:
?
#22
Report 17 years ago
#22
(Original post by viviki)
I think its worse. When I look back on my GCSE and A Levels i can appreciate how easy they were in comparison with my degree. But looking back on my degree now I'm doing my postgrad, yes the postgrad is more work but I still see my degree as being really hard.
yeah even though i have'nt done my degree yet i also appreciate its gonn be hard
0
Tednol
Badges: 10
Rep:
?
#23
Report 17 years ago
#23
(Original post by Mark_KK)
A friend of mine who is currently at University said that the marking system grade boundaries (Hons, 2:1 etc...) is based upon how well you do against others in your year over the duration of the course. This is opposed to a system where the boundaries are set i.e. the driving theory test where you need 30 or over to pass out of 35 (or you did when I took it).

Is this true and if so I can see logic in perhaps going to a slightly less acclaimed (but still credible) University as you would be up against people who supposably have less academic ability. This should theoretically get you a better chance of coming out with a good degree albeit from a slightly less acclaimed establishment.

I.E. I have chosen to study Law and if I studied at Hull or Lancaster (still credible red brick uni's) I should theoretially have a better chance of a good grade compared to say if I went to Leeds or Nottingham as the others on my course may not be the "academic elite" I would encounter at the latter Universities.

Is this so?
1:1, over 70%
2:1, over 60%
2:2, over 50%
3, over 40%

Thats at University of Manchester anyway.
0
hotnanoo
Badges: 6
Rep:
?
#24
Report 17 years ago
#24
(Original post by Tednol)
1:1, over 70%
2:1, over 60%
2:2, over 50%
3, over 40%

Thats at University of Manchester anyway.
cool cuz i'v applied there not bad,
0
Juwel
Badges: 18
Rep:
?
#25
Report 17 years ago
#25
(Original post by hotnanoo)
cool cuz i'v applied there not bad,
Exactly what I was thinking!!!
0
[email protected]
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#26
Report 17 years ago
#26
(Original post by viviki)
Its a lot harder than you imagine. When I first went to uni I was sure I would get a first but it didnt happen, the way of studying is completely different its a bit of a shocker.
For example for English you go from reading about 6 books a term to at least 3 books a week.
Where are YOU studying English? I am doing my degree at Birmingham and I am definately NOT reading 'at least 3 books a week!'
0
PQ
Badges: 21
Rep:
?
#27
Report 17 years ago
#27
(Original post by Mark_KK)
I.E. I have chosen to study Law and if I studied at Hull or Lancaster (still credible red brick uni's) I should theoretially have a better chance of a good grade compared to say if I went to Leeds or Nottingham as the others on my course may not be the "academic elite" I would encounter at the latter Universities.

Is this so?
The grades aren't standardised most of the time (although some uni's do standardise in some subjects - when I've finished my analysis (when hell freezes over) of degree classifications by subject by uni I'll let you know the one's which award the same %age of 1sts, 2is, 2iis etc each yr and which ones don't). It's almost impossible to standardise because all uni's are monitored by external examiners who come in and check that a students who is being awarded a 1st is producing 1st quality work etc etc for all the different classifications.

Just out of curiosity I has a look at the uni's you're mentioned for law and how they rate for A levels/1sts & 2is awarded.

Hull - 53% 1sts and 2is - slightly below average considering the A level average of their intake for that yr (varied between 38% and 70% over 4 yrs)
Lancaster - 65% - quite a way above average considering intake quality (varied between 55% and 69% over 4 yrs)
Leeds - 78% - about the same above average as Lancs but much higher intake quality (varied between 66% and 78%)
Nottingham - 71% - dead average considering intake quality which is about the same as Leeds' (varied between 65% and 79%)

All these uni's have varied quite considerably over time so it's unlikely they're using a quota system to award the top classifications.
0
Ditzy
Badges: 1
Rep:
?
#28
Report 17 years ago
#28
(Original post by Pencil Queen)
The grades aren't standardised most of the time (although some uni's do standardise in some subjects - when I've finished my analysis (when hell freezes over) of degree classifications by subject by uni I'll let you know the one's which award the same %age of 1sts, 2is, 2iis etc each yr and which ones don't). It's almost impossible to standardise because all uni's are monitored by external examiners who come in and check that a students who is being awarded a 1st is producing 1st quality work etc etc for all the different classifications.

Just out of curiosity I has a look at the uni's you're mentioned for law and how they rate for A levels/1sts & 2is awarded.

Hull - 53% 1sts and 2is - slightly below average considering the A level average of their intake for that yr (varied between 38% and 70% over 4 yrs)
Lancaster - 65% - quite a way above average considering intake quality (varied between 55% and 69% over 4 yrs)
Leeds - 78% - about the same above average as Lancs but much higher intake quality (varied between 66% and 78%)
Nottingham - 71% - dead average considering intake quality which is about the same as Leeds' (varied between 65% and 79%)

All these uni's have varied quite considerably over time so it's unlikely they're using a quota system to award the top classifications.
Just out of curiosity, what do the percentages represent?
0
viviki
Badges: 14
Rep:
?
#29
Report 17 years ago
#29
I've finished my degree. I was at UWA, we would tend to do 3 modules per semester. A seminar for each module per week, and each seminar would be on a different book hence at least 3 books a week. SOmetimes the seminars would be on more than one book. I found it tough but I did the course because of its diversity and the interesting material it covered. I got offers from all the universities I applied for but most of the main unis seemed to cover a lot more of the traditional texts ie. Chaucer and Shakespeare and I had had more than enough of that by the time I left school.
0
PQ
Badges: 21
Rep:
?
#30
Report 17 years ago
#30
(Original post by ditzy blonde)
Just out of curiosity, what do the percentages represent?
The %age of 1sts & 2is awarded out of all degrees awarded (ie (1sts + 2is)/(1sts+2is+2iis+3rds+passes)*100)
0
X
new posts
Back
to top
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

Following the government's announcement, do you think you will be awarded a fair grade this year?

Yes (313)
52.69%
No (281)
47.31%

Watched Threads

View All