I or We, Me or Us Watch

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Jack
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#1
Report 17 years ago
#1
Hi

I wonder whether you can help me with a small "English" problem

Say I'm a company director writing to a bank manager.

Do I finish with;

Please call me if you have any queries with the enclosed figures

or

Please call us if you have any queries with the enclosed figures

What are the rules for using Us and Me. The same applies to I and We. What are the rules?

Many thanks
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Cybercypher
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#2
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#2
"Jack" <[email protected]> burbled news:[email protected]:

[q1]> Hi[/q1]
[q1]>[/q1]
[q1]> I wonder whether you can help me with a small "English" problem[/q1]
[q1]>[/q1]
[q1]> Say I'm a company director writing to a bank manager.[/q1]
[q1]>[/q1]
[q1]> Do I finish with;[/q1]
[q1]>[/q1]
[q1]> Please call me if you have any queries with the enclosed figures[/q1]

This is perfectly fine if you change "with" to "about" and if you are willing to have the bank
manager call you personally.
[q1]>[/q1]
[q1]> or[/q1]
[q1]>[/q1]
[q1]> Please call us if you have any queries [about] the enclosed figures[/q1]

This is perfectly fine if you want to let the bank manager know that you are not the only person in
the company who can deal with queries about the figures.

[q1]> What are the rules for using Us and Me.[/q1]

[q1]> The same applies to I and We. What are the rules?[/q1]

Make it personal (I, Me) if you are the responsible person and the queries should or must be
directed to you and only you. Use "Us, We" if it doesn't matter who receives the queries and
answers them.

--
Franke: "There are no great religions, only great myths and great mistakes." Bodhisattva F. A.
Tchirl. Grammar 1: Internalized rules for the spoken language. Grammar 2: Formal rules for the
written language. Grammar 1 does not equal Grammar 2.
0
Jack
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#3
Report 17 years ago
#3
Thanks Franke Mind you, I'm not sure about the "with the figures" vs. "about the figures"

I say "they're both correct".

J

"CyberCypher" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
[q1]> "Jack" <[email protected]> burbled news:[email protected]:[/q1]
[q1]>[/q1]
[q2]> > Hi[/q2]
[q2]> >[/q2]
[q2]> > I wonder whether you can help me with a small "English" problem[/q2]
[q2]> >[/q2]
[q2]> > Say I'm a company director writing to a bank manager.[/q2]
[q2]> >[/q2]
[q2]> > Do I finish with;[/q2]
[q2]> >[/q2]
[q2]> > Please call me if you have any queries with the enclosed figures[/q2]
[q1]>[/q1]
[q1]> This is perfectly fine if you change "with" to "about" and if you are willing to have the bank[/q1]
[q1]> manager call you personally.[/q1]
[q2]> >[/q2]
[q2]> > or[/q2]
[q2]> >[/q2]
[q2]> > Please call us if you have any queries [about] the enclosed figures[/q2]
[q1]>[/q1]
[q1]> This is perfectly fine if you want to let the bank manager know that you are not the only person[/q1]
[q1]> in the company who can deal with queries about the figures.[/q1]
[q1]>[/q1]
[q2]> > What are the rules for using Us and Me.[/q2]
[q1]>[/q1]
[q2]> > The same applies to I and We. What are the rules?[/q2]
[q1]>[/q1]
[q1]> Make it personal (I, Me) if you are the responsible person and the queries should or must be[/q1]
[q1]> directed to you and only you. Use "Us, We" if it doesn't matter who receives the queries and[/q1]
[q1]> answers them.[/q1]
[q1]>[/q1]
[q1]> --[/q1]
[q1]> Franke: "There are no great religions, only great myths and great mistakes." Bodhisattva F. A.[/q1]
[q1]> Tchirl. Grammar 1: Internalized rules for the spoken language. Grammar 2: Formal rules for the[/q1]
[q1]> written language. Grammar 1 does not equal Grammar 2.[/q1]
0
Cybercypher
Badges:
#4
Report 17 years ago
#4
"Jack" <[email protected]> burbled news:[email protected]:

[q1]> "CyberCypher" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...[/q1]
[q2]>> "Jack" <[email protected]> burbled news:[email protected]:[/q2]
[q2]>>[/q2]
[q2]>> > Hi[/q2]
[q2]>> >[/q2]
[q2]>> > I wonder whether you can help me with a small "English" problem[/q2]
[q2]>> >[/q2]
[q2]>> > Say I'm a company director writing to a bank manager.[/q2]
[q2]>> >[/q2]
[q2]>> > Do I finish with;[/q2]
[q2]>> >[/q2]
[q2]>> > Please call me if you have any queries with the enclosed figures[/q2]
[q2]>>[/q2]
[q2]>> This is perfectly fine if you change "with" to "about" and if you are willing to have the bank[/q2]
[q2]>> manager call you personally.[/q2]
[q2]>> >[/q2]
[q2]>> > or[/q2]
[q2]>> >[/q2]
[q2]>> > Please call us if you have any queries [about] the enclosed figures[/q2]
[q2]>>[/q2]
[q2]>> This is perfectly fine if you want to let the bank manager know that you are not the only person[/q2]
[q2]>> in the company who can deal with queries about the figures.[/q2]
[q2]>>[/q2]
[q2]>> > What are the rules for using Us and Me.[/q2]
[q2]>>[/q2]
[q2]>> > The same applies to I and We. What are the rules?[/q2]
[q2]>>[/q2]
[q2]>> Make it personal (I, Me) if you are the responsible person and the queries should or must be[/q2]
[q2]>> directed to you and only you. Use "Us, We" if it doesn't matter who receives the queries and[/q2]
[q2]>> answers them.[/q2]

[q1]> Thanks Franke[/q1]

You're welcome, J.

[q1]> Mind you, I'm not sure about the "with the figures" vs. "about the figures"[/q1]
[q1]>[/q1]
[q1]> I say "they're both correct".[/q1]

You can say "questions" instead of "queries" and then it should be plain that "about" is the
only choice. You can use "with" after "question" if you use it in this way: "He asked a question
with more bite than anyone had realized". Here is what Merriam-Webster's Dictionary of English
Usage says:

question
1. When question is followed by a preposition, it is usually _of_:*** ... poses the somber question
of whether we are in for another war - Time, 15 Apr. 1946 Nor does the question of length trouble
a novelist -Bernard DeVoto, The World of Fiction, 1950 A little honest thieving hurts no one,
especially when it is a question of gold -Graham Greene, Travels with My Aunt, 1969 There was the
question of Jefferson Davis. In my shadowy understanding of history, I assumed that ... he was
beyond reproach -Robert Penn Warren, Jefferson Davis Gets His Citizenship Back, 1980 The question
of whether it is appropriate for private U.S. banks to lend to foreign governments has yet to be
debated -Felix G. Rohatyn, The Twenty-Year Century, 1983

Question is also used, but much less frequently, with _about_ and _as to_: *** You've got to tell
them the exact truth. There's really no question about it -Rose Macaulay, Potterism, 1920 ... the
procedures ... are not easy and there is considerable question as to their value -James B. Conant,
Slums and Suburbs, 1961

2. Preceded by a qualifier like no or little, question is often followed by a clause introduced by
_but that_, _but what_, or simply _that_. Reader's Digest 1983 prefers that, though acknowledging
the other conjunctions. All are standard. There is no question but that there will be a general
rise in wages in the next month or two -Edwin A. Lahey, New Republic, 1 Oct. 1945 There is no
question but that these changes shift the civilian-military balance -Townsend Hoopes, Yale Rev.,
December 1953 There can be no question but what the action taken ... did much to discourage
future attempts to pick up cheap gains -Leland M. Goodrich, Jour. of International Affairs,
Spring 1952 There is no question but what the national nominating convention is a faithful
expression of the genius of the American people -Wilfred E. Binkley, New Republic, 1 Mar. 1954
... there seemed little question that it would be able to count on government support - Collier's
Year Book, 1949

Question may also be followed by a clause introduced by _whether_ or _which_: This view begs the
question whether literature is only or essentially art -Wayne Shumaker, Elements of Critical Theory,
1952 The President and the Prime Minister were both accustomed to holding the centre of the stage.
In a sense, what the "first summit" was about was the question which would up-stage the other -
Times Literary Supp., 9 Apr. 1970

--
Franke: "There are no great religions, only great myths and great mistakes." Bodhisattva F. A.
Tchirl. Grammar 1: Internalized rules for the spoken language. Grammar 2: Formal rules for the
written language. Grammar 1 does not equal Grammar 2.
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