a little help on some physics??

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i_hate_science
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#1
Report Thread starter 16 years ago
#1
k this is just a quick question for some physics coursework. im pretty sure that my teacher explained, but he speaks little english so i guess you guys would be more help.

when cooking a potato in water, why does it take longer to cook when you have a greater volume of water? (e.g. when cooking a potato in a pan with 250cm3 in, it wont take as long as when cooking a potato in 500cm3 of water.)

any ideas? cheers.
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purple
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#2
Report 16 years ago
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(Original post by i_hate_science)
k this is just a quick question for some physics coursework. im pretty sure that my teacher explained, but he speaks little english so i guess you guys would be more help.

when cooking a potato in water, why does it take longer to cook when you have a greater volume of water? (e.g. when cooking a potato in a pan with 250cm3 in, it wont take as long as when cooking a potato in 500cm3 of water.)

any ideas? cheers.
It takes longer to cook with more water because it will take longer to heat up a large amount of water that to heat up a small amount, and the potato will need the water to be at a certain heat before it starts cooking. This is provided you are putting the same amount of heat energy into the water each time.
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M Safe
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Report 16 years ago
#3
(Original post by i_hate_science)
k this is just a quick question for some physics coursework. im pretty sure that my teacher explained, but he speaks little english so i guess you guys would be more help.

when cooking a potato in water, why does it take longer to cook when you have a greater volume of water? (e.g. when cooking a potato in a pan with 250cm3 in, it wont take as long as when cooking a potato in 500cm3 of water.)

any ideas? cheers.
is the water the same temp in each case? If so, there enegy contained, in 500cm3 of water is physically more than that in 250cm(E=mc(delta)T.There are more thernally agitated molecules of water (E=0.5mv^2) which is of the order of kT (where k is the boltzman constant), so there is a greater chance of collision between potato surface and the water mols. And it is these collisions which cook the potato. Look the formula up in a textbook, but the essential physics is here.

Hopw this is a bit clearer.
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