Special consideration for prolonged illness Watch

samxsnap
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#1
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I have a letter of consideration being sent off with my exam results for prolonged illness (over two years) and I'm not entirely sure the effect this will have on my grade. In some ways I don't want sympathy marks, but I think its a good idea that my situation is taken into account when marking. Also, does it mean that I can't reach the top grades? I mean, I shouldn't think so but I thought I'd make sure.

Thanks
xx
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Meridian_Star
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SC doesn't normally affect your grade much at all - basically, if the board feels it is appropriate you might get a few % extra added to your mark (probably not more than about 3%). If you do really well they might say you don't need the extra marks so they won't change your percentage, but apart from that it won't affect your ability to reach the top grades at all
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samxsnap
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Thanks a lot, that's a big load off of my mind :-)
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supercoolfred
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It depends what illness it is. On a side note - someone said that if an immediate parent is absent during the time of exams, you get special consideration? My Father works abroad. Does this count?
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<3 biology!
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(Original post by supercoolfred)
It depends what illness it is. On a side note - someone said that if an immediate parent is absent during the time of exams, you get special consideration? My Father works abroad. Does this count?
What?! :eek: My dad works abroad, but I don't think it really calls for any special consideration.
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kaliedoscope
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(Original post by supercoolfred)
It depends what illness it is. On a side note - someone said that if an immediate parent is absent during the time of exams, you get special consideration? My Father works abroad. Does this count?
Hmm, probably not if you're used to it, it's just a part of your everyday life, after all.

It maybe means if one of your parents has just walked out or something.
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samxsnap
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(Original post by supercoolfred)
It depends what illness it is. On a side note - someone said that if an immediate parent is absent during the time of exams, you get special consideration? My Father works abroad. Does this count?
Nice try but I think it's probably if a parent walks out or something! :p:
My 'prolonged illness' is anorexia. I was in an eating disorder clinic for three months earlier on this year. I didn't say as I didn't really want to sound like a sob story, or as if I was boasting.

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Kinesthetic
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If the illness is terminal you will, without a doubt, receive the maximum of 5% of RAW marks added on.

Anorexia would probably be 3% of 4%, depending on how strong the doctors note is.
This is 3% of raw marks. So, if the paper is out of 100 and you score 70... 3% of 2.1 marks, so they'd add 2 on.
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