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*Ally*
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#1
Report Thread starter 9 years ago
#1
I want to join the army.

But right now I am know where near passing the basic physical test, just looking for some advice for the best training.

I can't do any pushups.
I can do about 30 sit ups in a row
I don't know how far I can run but on treadmills i think for like 25 mins at 8.5 speed.

So i'm pretty unfit, but i'm willing to train everyday, unless thats bad. And do I need to change my diet, I eat fairly healthy atm, pretty big portion sizes, 3 main meals, some snacks.

I'm an utter noob really, please help (and no jokes!, I am determined to do it).
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FallenPetal
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#2
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The key to being good at exercise is...

building up.

Thats it.

You might not be able to run a mile, but if you run as much as you can one day and then try and beat it (you can even give yourself a points based reward for everytime you do so; e.g. 1 point for every time you beat it, 10 points = reward) it will eventually add up to a mile. How long it takes varies on what you are doing, but even marathon winners have to train darling ;]]

When I started doing sit-ups I could only manage ten, a few weeks later I could do 30 (40 if I really pushed myself).

I think your main problem is your no-can-do attitude. Think positive and you will succeed
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Hammeh
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#3
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First thing first Ally, everyone has to start somewhere! Whether you can't do any at all or you can only do a few, most of all you need to have the determination and believe in yourself a bit more

Its good to see your interest in the forces, im in the stages of joining the RAF and have passed the fitness stage and medical so i know exactly how you feel.

Its best to try and stay off a treadmill when working on fitness, i would recommend doing cross country as you use alot more muscle as your running on different terrain instead of a flat surface.

As for push-ups and sit-ups theres only really one way to improve on them and thats by doing them frequently, try aiming for 4-5 pushups then say 20 situps and gradually increase as you go along the days, i wouldn't train everyday as your body needs time to rest and being unfit will probably cause an injury by working too hard, so thats a big no no. As for you diet it looks pretty spot on.

Hope this helps and let me know how you get on
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4G_dollars
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#4
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#4
haaaaaaaaahahahahhahahahah IMAO
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taurus26
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#5
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#5
Im in exxxxactly the samae position! But in the forces you are supposed to be super fit and Im a right slob at the moment!
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Hammeh
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(Original post by taurus26)
Im in exxxxactly the samae position! But in the forces you are supposed to be super fit and Im a right slob at the moment!
Haha i wouldn't say super fit, but you need to have a standard amount of fitness, which tbh isn't fairly hard to get too aslong as you work towards it!
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teriaki
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#7
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(Original post by *Ally*)
I want to join the army.

But right now I am know where near passing the basic physical test, just looking for some advice for the best training.

I can't do any pushups.
I can do about 30 sit ups in a row
I don't know how far I can run but on treadmills i think for like 25 mins at 8.5 speed.

So i'm pretty unfit, but i'm willing to train everyday, unless thats bad. And do I need to change my diet, I eat fairly healthy atm, pretty big portion sizes, 3 main meals, some snacks.

I'm an utter noob really, please help (and no jokes!, I am determined to do it).
All it takes is practice.
First off, don't run on a treadmill. You won't be seeing any treadmills in the army so there is no point in training on them. Running outside is more fun as well.
And I can't believe sit ups are actually judged in the military, considering that they work such an insignificant muscle (well every muscle is important but if you were going to judge lifts, sit ups are probably among the most important).
Sit ups allow for quite a bit of leniency regarding form. There are ways to make them harder for yourself, and there are ways to make them easier for yourself. If you don't think you're very good at them, you can try to do them more easily just to pass the test....providing of course that the instructors don't force you to do them in a certain way.
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ch0c0h01ic
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#8
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#8
(Original post by *Ally*)
I can't do any pushups.
I can do about 30 sit ups in a row
I don't know how far I can run but on treadmills i think for like 25 mins at 8.5 speed.
1) Find out the EXACT requirements, it does vary depending on unit/force and tailor your routine accordingly. Some will require pullups, buddy carries, rope climbing, etc, others won't.

2) Check out the Fitness Centre of Military.com, the Royal Marine workout tool, Greasing the Groove, 'The Navy Seal Workout', etc - they all have the information and routines you need.
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Vivisteiner
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#9
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#9
Sit ups aren't very good exercises tbh.

Push ups on the other hand are awesome. You can start doing push ups with knees on the ground maybe to gain strength. Eventually you should be able to do 40 proper ones straight, with good form.

Other thing is to go to the gym. Do running - lots of it. Lift weights with proper form. Eat a good diet. Bassically just focus on getting a good health. Drink plenty of water and eat lots of protein.
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Lemons
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#10
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#10
As a girl who used to be very unfit I would say just start out small and work your way up. Do different things as well so you don't get bored. For example, over the christmas vac I had to get fitter in order to row (well to row better, you can row when you're very unfit you'll just hardly move). So I did at least some exercise every day, I started out with about 20 mins on an exercise bike, then some days I would run, other days I would do circuit type stuff, like lots of sit ups and squats and the like, and then when I could I used a rowing machine (just make sure you're doing it right if you use one). At the beginning it's horrible, but if you add a tiny bit more everyday you'll slowly get better.

Make sure you have a good work out playlist as well. It really helps.
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Steve86
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#11
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#11
I remember the guardian doing a training program for the army last year.

Here it is... http://www.guardian.co.uk/lifeandsty...being.fitness1
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taurus26
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#12
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#12
(Original post by Hammeh)
Haha i wouldn't say super fit, but you need to have a standard amount of fitness, which tbh isn't fairly hard to get too aslong as you work towards it!
I drove to Aldershot once (ha sad act) because I wanted to see what it was like, and there was a really long row of guys running up and down the fields there and there were some right fatties.... but i thought that might be a group of "special" people...
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Hammeh
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#13
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(Original post by taurus26)
I drove to Aldershot once (ha sad act) because I wanted to see what it was like, and there was a really long row of guys running up and down the fields there and there were some right fatties.... but i thought that might be a group of "special" people...
Aldershot being where you do basic training im guessing? Its not sad at all As for the Royal Air Force we get sent on a 2 day induction to be familiarized with what the Regiment holds, which is pretty helpful. You will find that basic training will be the hardest of most army life as they push you too your limits to see how much pressure you can take, but as i said, if you go in with standard fitness it shouldn't be a problem as they work on your fitness as soon as you get there, whether its running up and down or running with bags on your back, people will be there to support you and your be suprised how much that helps to get something done! They will get you very fit and expect you too stay at that level of fitness.

Edit; Forgot to mention, in some cases they will work on your fitness for 2 weeks before you begin your basic training if they think you need more fitness, this might be why you saw the group running around. (For RAF anyway)
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*Ally*
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#14
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#14
Right, i've decided on what I'm going to do, i've got some really daft questions that are prolly painfully obvious but I don't know:

1. Apparantly i need to warm up and cool down, this seems to involve light stretching and controlled rotation of the shoulders and hips apparantly. What is light stretching, what the hell am I meant to be stretching. I have vague memories of being told to stretch in P.E when I was 12, but yeah what do I do?

2. What can I do as an alternative to a tricep dip while I'm at uni? (we only have stools and like computer chairs u see). Like to work the same muscles of whatever

3. What can I do as an alternative to chin ups, I don't have one of those bars, or should I get one? Again to like work on the same area.

4. Sit ups kind of hurt my neck, what am I doing wrong? I assume its wrong anyway.

5. The other excericises it recomends are heel raises and lunges, they don't seem very I don't know difficult?

Sorry I have so many questions!

6. Last one I promise, should i be doing the excercises like and running every day? I should I do them on alternate days?
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ch0c0h01ic
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#15
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#15
(Original post by *Ally*)
1. Apparantly i need to warm up and cool down, this seems to involve light stretching and controlled rotation of the shoulders and hips apparantly. What is light stretching, what the hell am I meant to be stretching. I have vague memories of being told to stretch in P.E when I was 12, but yeah what do I do?
Don't do static stretches during a warmup, instead stick to several minutes of cardio (could be jumping jacks) and then do some dynamic stretching (ie; arm rotations, walking lunges, high knees, heels to arse, etc). Then if your going to resistance train follow it up with some warmup sets. So if you're going to be doing pushups, do some sets off your knees and/or on an elevated surface if you intend to do full pushups.

(Original post by *Ally*)
2. What can I do as an alternative to a tricep dip while I'm at uni? (we only have stools and like computer chairs u see). Like to work the same muscles of whatever
Google 'bench dips'.

(Original post by *Ally*)
3. What can I do as an alternative to chin ups, I don't have one of those bars, or should I get one? Again to like work on the same area.
If your PT test requires you to do x amount of pullups or chinups, you're going to have to do pullups. You can pick up doorway bars which screw (Argos) or attach to your doorway (PowerBar).

(Original post by *Ally*)
4. Sit ups kind of hurt my neck, what am I doing wrong? I assume its wrong anyway.
-Don't pull on your neck with your arms, focus on using your abs to pull yourself up (Lightly touching your fingers to your ears may help)
-Keep your head/neck in a neutral position in line with your spine

(Original post by *Ally*)
5. The other excericises it recomends are heel raises and lunges, they don't seem very I don't know difficult?
It's a beginner routine, of course some of the exercises are going to be easy, just make sure you're performing them correctly and not taking any short cuts. Make sure you're doing a full range of motion and doing them in a slow and controlled manner.

(Original post by *Ally*)
6. Last one I promise, should i be doing the excercises like and running every day? I should I do them on alternate days?
Get on a decent routine and stick to it. You don't know what you're doing so it's pointless you trying to develop a routine. You shouldn't be working out every day, your body needs rest.
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*Ally*
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#16
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#16
Cheers

I take it back, I love the easy excercises. I can only do a few box pressups, this is going to be a long road
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acid8000
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#17
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#17
Join a martial arts class, preferably boxing or Thai boxing. They work a lot on core exercises, particularly pressups and situps. A lot of endurance work, just what you need for the army. Trainers also tend to stress the importance of form, quality over quantity with the exercises if you will.

I went to a class for about 9 months, I've gone from a maximum of less than 10 pressups to around 40-50 in less than a minute. I also wanted to join the military at one stage, so good luck!
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iceandfire
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#18
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#18
I'm in the same boat wanna join the RAF. I started off getting tired after, like, 15 sit ups and now I can do 32 in one minute. Lots of good advice here and I have no clue so yeah, just build up the amount you do and keep at it. Good luck!

Also could someone please tell me if treadmill/ terrain makes a huge difference? Will I be able to do longer on a treadmill?
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Hammeh
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#19
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(Original post by iceandfire)
I'm in the same boat wanna join the RAF. I started off getting tired after, like, 15 sit ups and now I can do 32 in one minute. Lots of good advice here and I have no clue so yeah, just build up the amount you do and keep at it. Good luck!

Also could someone please tell me if treadmill/ terrain makes a huge difference? Will I be able to do longer on a treadmill?
Not to worry ice when your on PRTC Your required to do 30 sit-ups and 10 press-ups (Not too sure about sit-ups off the top of my head but i know males have to do 35) so keep at it and your ease your way through

As for running i would recommend terrain as treadmills don't require as much power / usage of the legs since its a machine, it depends really, i find that i can run longer on terrain then a treadmill but others are the opposite
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iceandfire
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#20
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(Original post by Hammeh)
Not to worry ice when your on PRTC Your required to do 30 sit-ups and 10 press-ups (Not too sure about sit-ups off the top of my head but i know males have to do 35) so keep at it and your ease your way through

As for running i would recommend terrain as treadmills don't require as much power / usage of the legs since its a machine, it depends really, i find that i can run longer on terrain then a treadmill but others are the opposite
Thanks
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