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Assessment of Music in KS1/2 watch

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    As a music co-ordinator in a Primary school, I ask all teacher to record one lesson each half term
    onto a tape. The lesson they record is usually the last lesson in a block of work. Each teacher also
    has a folder for storing any written/drawn work completed in music.

    What do other school use to assess music / sample work done in music? How else do schools keep
    evidence of music lessons?

    In article <[email protected] k>, "Year 5 teacher" <[email protected]> writes:

    [q1]>As a music co-ordinator in a Primary school, I ask all teacher to record one lesson each half term[/q1]
    [q1]>onto a tape. The lesson they record is usually the last lesson in a block of work. Each teacher[/q1]
    [q1]>also has a folder for storing any written/drawn work completed in music.[/q1]
    [q1]>[/q1]
    [q1]>What do other school use to assess music / sample work done in music? How else do schools keep[/q1]
    [q1]>evidence of music lessons?[/q1]
    [q1]>[/q1]

    We don't. We have enough on our plates for "assessment" <spit!> as it is, although I did do a
    recording a couple of times this year of some of the stuff the kids did. Mostly for them, rather
    than for me.

    ----------------------------------------------------
    Sandi

    Remove NoSpam to reply.

    Year 5 teacher wrote in message ...
    [q1]>As a music co-ordinator in a Primary school, I ask all teacher to record[/q1]
    one
    [q1]>lesson each half term onto a tape. The lesson they record is usually the last lesson in a block of[/q1]
    [q1]>work. Each teacher also has a folder for storing any written/drawn work completed in music.[/q1]
    [q1]>[/q1]
    [q1]>What do other school use to assess music / sample work done in music? How else do schools keep[/q1]
    [q1]>evidence of music lessons?[/q1]
    [q1]>[/q1]
    [q1]>[/q1]
    Judging by the complete lack of music in many of the new intake of Year 7 each September -
    not much!!

    Some of the children don't even seem to have done any singing at their primary schools, while others
    are quite able to compose, perform and sing with real confidence. The good ones are, sadly, in a
    minority - and I have, for some time now, suspected the literacy and numeracy hours - with music
    being the easiest subject to justify binning.

    Am I wrong - or have others found the same things?

    StJohn

    [q1]> In article <[email protected] k>, "Year 5 teacher" <[email protected]> writes:[/q1]
    [q1]>[/q1]
    [q2]> >As a music co-ordinator in a Primary school, I ask all teacher to record[/q2]
    one
    [q2]> >lesson each half term onto a tape. The lesson they record is usually the last lesson in a block[/q2]
    [q2]> >of work. Each teacher also has a folder for[/q2]
    storing
    [q2]> >any written/drawn work completed in music.[/q2]
    [q2]> >[/q2]
    [q2]> >What do other school use to assess music / sample work done in music? How else do schools keep[/q2]
    [q2]> >evidence of music lessons?[/q2]
    [q2]> >[/q2]
    I hope our new music co-ordinator doesn't expect all this :-(

    ---
    Outgoing mail is certified Virus Free. Checked by AVG anti-virus system (http://www.grisoft.com).
    Version: 6.0.372 / Virus Database: 207 - Release Date: 20/06/2002

    I'm glad I don't work in your school!

    Do all the teachers comply!

    Terry

    "Shaz" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    [q1]>[/q1]
    [q2]> > In article <[email protected] k>, "Year 5 teacher" <[email protected]> writes:[/q2]
    [q2]> >[/q2]
    [q3]> > >As a music co-ordinator in a Primary school, I ask all teacher to[/q3]
    record
    [q1]> one[/q1]
    [q3]> > >lesson each half term onto a tape. The lesson they record is usually[/q3]
    the
    [q3]> > >last lesson in a block of work. Each teacher also has a folder for[/q3]
    [q1]> storing[/q1]
    [q3]> > >any written/drawn work completed in music.[/q3]
    [q3]> > >[/q3]
    [q3]> > >What do other school use to assess music / sample work done in music? How else do schools keep[/q3]
    [q3]> > >evidence of music lessons?[/q3]
    [q3]> > >[/q3]
    [q1]> I hope our new music co-ordinator doesn't expect all this :-([/q1]
    [q1]>[/q1]
    [q1]>[/q1]
    [q1]> ---[/q1]
    [q1]> Outgoing mail is certified Virus Free. Checked by AVG anti-virus system (http://www.grisoft.com).[/q1]
    [q1]> Version: 6.0.372 / Virus Database: 207 - Release Date: 20/06/2002[/q1]

    In article <[email protected] p2-win.server.ntli.net>, "StJohn"
    <[email protected]> writes:

    [q1]>Judging by the complete lack of music in many of the new intake of Year 7 each September -[/q1]
    [q1]>not much!![/q1]
    [q1]>[/q1]
    [q1]>Some of the children don't even seem to have done any singing at their primary schools, while[/q1]
    [q1]>others are quite able to compose, perform and sing with real confidence. The good ones are, sadly,[/q1]
    [q1]>in a minority - and I have, for some time now, suspected the literacy and numeracy hours - with[/q1]
    [q1]>music being the easiest subject to justify binning.[/q1]
    [q1]>[/q1]
    [q1]>Am I wrong - or have others found the same things?[/q1]

    Some of us are desperately trying to fit music into a crowded curriculum. (And some of my kids
    really are tone deaf - no matter how simply I try to teach them to sing!!)

    I'm lucky to get music in once a month, let alone once a week!

    ----------------------------------------------------
    Sandi

    Remove NoSpam to reply.

    [q1]>As a music co-ordinator in a Primary school, I ask all teacher to record one lesson each half term[/q1]
    [q1]>onto a tape. The lesson they record is usually the last lesson in a block of work. Each teacher[/q1]
    [q1]>also has a folder for storing any written/drawn work completed in music.[/q1]

    You have got to be joking ...

    Our kids have a weekly singing session, we have a thriving choir and a yearly music evening. All
    fab, all run by our talented music coordinator.

    Class wise, not so good. We have purchased the LCP music, which has helped me a lot. For 12 years, I
    have detested music lessons, and felt I delivered it badly. I do try, but it is the first thing to
    go if I am pushed. Probably do a music lesson fortnightly, but I don't think they're up to much.
    Assessment - not a lot, well, none actually! I think the kids get a lot more from other subjects. I
    can see the value in KS1, but by KS2 it has become repetitive and uninspiring. Music or game of
    rounders? Sorry, no choice!

    --
    Sarah Jack <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    [q1]>[/q1]
    [q2]> >As a music co-ordinator in a Primary school, I ask all teacher to record[/q2]
    one
    [q2]> >lesson each half term onto a tape. The lesson they record is usually the last lesson in a block[/q2]
    [q2]> >of work. Each teacher also has a folder for[/q2]
    storing
    [q2]> >any written/drawn work completed in music.[/q2]
    [q1]>[/q1]
    [q1]> You have got to be joking ...[/q1]

    The joy of music lies not in the assessment process, but in the music itself. If we as teachers, and
    as a society have come to the situation where we even have to assess music against some strange
    criteria set by who knows who, then we really have hit the bottom.

    If there ever was a baby thrown away with the bathwater, it was the way music was presented in the
    National Curriculum. Obviously, the guys who wrote the curriculum took good ideas from many schools,
    then assumed that all teachers could deliver lessons like that all the time. Where I
    teach.......Wales......which always had a wonderful tradition for music, I knew of schools that were
    really good at composition....others good at singing....others had great orchestras and bands. None
    had all. The expectation of the NC however was that we had to be Masters of All. We then appeared to
    have suffered a ten year period where schools completely floundered, trying to get their heads
    around the new orders. I wouldn't like to say this too loud, but now I feel that music has been
    completely sidelined, and frequently isn't taught at all by some (most) KS2 & 1 teachers. Those that
    do, concentrate on delivering their own expertise, paying lip service only to areas where they feel
    less confident. But that is only my opinion, and I might be wrong, so I'll get down off my soap box.
    As for the original question.....recording staff's lessons once per term. Brilliant idea. Just three
    points. 1) Is any of it actually any good? 2) Apart from you, who's ever going to have the time to
    listen? 3) Do you make your own coffee in the staffroom?

    Best wishes, Phil

    We have LCP too. Can I ask you - in our school, music has often been done following BBC tapes and
    stuff. Then I was given the task of implementing the new scheme. The kids couldn't cope with it and
    eventually neither could
    I. I only did Years 5 and 6 and I'm a music teacher and a singer and I found it hard. I wouldn't
    have liked to be a non-specialist teacher trying to use it. Anyway, the question is, how easy
    have you found it to implement? Despite the easy layout, I do feel teachers need some knowledge
    to be able to follow it, or at least have the confidence to try it. What do you think?

    Donna

    I've used the LCP scheme as a basis but rewritten the scheme into 6 blocks of work for each year
    group. I implemented the new planning in January this year, and has been very successful so far. All
    the non-specialists says that they feel as though they are actually teaching music and that they are
    challenging the pupils - a success!

    "Grand Poobah" <[email protected] co.uk> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    [q1]> We have LCP too. Can I ask you - in our school, music has often been done following BBC tapes and[/q1]
    [q1]> stuff. Then I was given the task of implementing the new scheme. The kids couldn't cope with it[/q1]
    [q1]> and eventually neither[/q1]
    could
    [q1]> I. I only did Years 5 and 6 and I'm a music teacher and a singer and I found it hard. I wouldn't[/q1]
    [q1]> have liked to be a non-specialist teacher[/q1]
    trying
    [q1]> to use it. Anyway, the question is, how easy have you found it to implement? Despite the easy[/q1]
    [q1]> layout, I do feel teachers need some[/q1]
    knowledge
    [q1]> to be able to follow it, or at least have the confidence to try it. What[/q1]
    do
    [q1]> you think?[/q1]
    [q1]>[/q1]
    [q1]> Donna[/q1]

    I've taught the Y6 stuff to Y5 this year. Yes I did find some hard, but I can read a music score (
    although not play sadly) so that helped a bit. Also, asked advice of fab music person if necessary,
    and found accompanying Cd a godsend. The children coped very well despite the fact that half of them
    had had me last year, in my "pre LCP, crappy banging of percussion instruments for no perceivable
    gain mode".

    --
    Sarah Grand Poobah <[email protected] co.uk> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    [q1]> We have LCP too. Can I ask you - in our school, music has often been done following BBC tapes and[/q1]
    [q1]> stuff. Then I was given the task of implementing the new scheme. The kids couldn't cope with it[/q1]
    [q1]> and eventually neither[/q1]
    could
    [q1]> I. I only did Years 5 and 6 and I'm a music teacher and a singer and I found it hard. I wouldn't[/q1]
    [q1]> have liked to be a non-specialist teacher[/q1]
    trying
    [q1]> to use it. Anyway, the question is, how easy have you found it to implement? Despite the easy[/q1]
    [q1]> layout, I do feel teachers need some[/q1]
    knowledge
    [q1]> to be able to follow it, or at least have the confidence to try it. What[/q1]
    do
    [q1]> you think?[/q1]
    [q1]>[/q1]
    [q1]> Donna[/q1]
 
 
 
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