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should working class people go to private school? watch

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    (Original post by naivesincerity)
    Totally agreed, i mean my dads uni degree has nothing to do with his career, afterwards he converted by professional exams, and learns new stuff all the time. Learning is life long, if you are interested enough...also many people forget what they learnt graduating at 21, maybeif that have a few years off, etc
    I've done tons of professional exams/interviews too. Chartered Builder, Chartered Surveyor. I'm working on my Chartered Arbitrator exams right now.....two more to do + a pupillage + a load of other BS and I'll make Chartered Arbitrator so I'll be chartered three times. Not bad for a thick ******* who left school at 16 if I do say so myself!

    I'm always fcukin around trying to get more letters after my name (in fact I'm a bit of a junkie in that regard)
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    (Original post by Howard)
    I've done tons of professional exams/interviews too. Chartered Builder, Chartered Surveyor. I'm working on my Chartered Arbitrator exams right now.....two more to do + a pupillage + a load of other BS and I'll make Chartered Arbitrator so I'll be chartered three times. Not bad for a thick ******* who left school at 16 if I do say so myself!

    I'm always fcukin around trying to get more letters after my name (in fact I'm a bit of a junkie in that regard)
    Yeah, i think some people are just unwise in that if they don't find their exact direction or do great going the conventional route early on, then they just think its a disaster if things didnt go perfectly and bail out, when theres loads of other routes, or there should be with a good education system
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    (Original post by naivesincerity)
    Yeah, i think some people are just unwise in that if they don't find their exact direction or do great going the conventional route early on, then they just think its a disaster if things didnt go perfectly and bail out, when theres loads of other routes, or there should be with a good education system
    There are many ways to skin a cat. I think it's BS all this "OMG if I don't get 4 A levels at A* I'll never get to Oxford and my life will really suck foreverafter" attitude. I blame parents and teachers for instilling this utter crap.

    Teachers I find the most culpable of all; telling 16 year olds who do **** at school that they're doomed to work in Tescos all their lives does them a disservice.
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    (Original post by Howard)
    There are many ways to skin a cat. I think it's BS all this "OMG if I don't get 4 A levels at A* I'll never get to Oxford and my life will really suck foreverafter" attitude. I blame parents and teachers for instilling this utter crap.

    Very true, it is quite absurd when you think about it, but as you say, its not the pupils fault, its been instilled, and at that age people have usually not had too much time for deep introspection, and questioning that, which is another problem, which i believe is partly caused by them having no time to. There is an obsession with over-cramming of usless information, (ie "broad" curriculum) when they would be much better of focus on the fundamentals, and teach more pure concepts and ideas. theres no point in learning piles of information when people havent been properly taught the ideas underlying them, theres just too much there.

    Teachers I find the most culpable of all; telling 16 year olds who do **** at school that they're doomed to work in Tescos all their lives does them a disservice.
    Yes, thats appalling and it contradicts everything that being a good teacher should be about
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    Of course they can but
    A) can they afford it? If not...
    B) Are they good enough for a scholorship?
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    Yeah scholarships are tough deals and if a private school doesn't want you they will do whatever they can in their power to stop you from going-last year our school had art scholarships going around 15-20 applied-they didn't like any of them so after all their hard work they made some crappy excuse of we're strapped for funds. Sorry. Also if they don't think you're going to get decent A-level results you are not entered in for the examination. Finally you have to come from a strict religious background as the school is focused heavily on Catholicism.
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    (Original post by ruthiepooos)
    Yeah scholarships are tough deals and if a private school doesn't want you they will do whatever they can in their power to stop you from going-last year our school had art scholarships going around 15-20 applied-they didn't like any of them so after all their hard work they made some crappy excuse of we're strapped for funds. Sorry. Also if they don't think you're going to get decent A-level results you are not entered in for the examination. Finally you have to come from a strict religious background as the school is focused heavily on Catholicism.
    I would say that a school who considered the calibre of candidates for a scholarship did not meet their standards, yet instead of demeaning the efforts of those canididates and causing loss of self esteem - say instead that they had insufficient funds to cover the costs of the places - acted in great kindness to those applicants.

    All schools that figure highly in performance league tables (with the exception of Thomas Telford Technology College) do not permit those students who they assess will not meet the higher grades to enter the examination. This is the result of published league tables and is anathema to me.

    All schools have published criteria for entry. A religious foundation school will obviously give greater priority for admission to those who practice or support the religious ethos of the school. If they did not that ethos would soon be eroded and the essence of the school's character would be lost - that very ethos and essence that parents wanted when they applied for a place for their child. :rolleyes:
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    When you put it like that...it doesn't seem so bad!
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    (Original post by Howard)
    I've done tons of professional exams/interviews too. Chartered Builder, Chartered Surveyor. I'm working on my Chartered Arbitrator exams right now.....two more to do + a pupillage + a load of other BS and I'll make Chartered Arbitrator so I'll be chartered three times. Not bad for a thick ******* who left school at 16 if I do say so myself!

    I'm always fcukin around trying to get more letters after my name (in fact I'm a bit of a junkie in that regard)
    I'm going out on a limb in assuming that your first name is simply 'H'.
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    (Original post by Howard)
    I've done tons of professional exams/interviews too. Chartered Builder, Chartered Surveyor. I'm working on my Chartered Arbitrator exams right now.....two more to do + a pupillage + a load of other BS and I'll make Chartered Arbitrator so I'll be chartered three times. Not bad for a thick ******* who left school at 16 if I do say so myself!

    I'm always fcukin around trying to get more letters after my name (in fact I'm a bit of a junkie in that regard)
    Good for you-goodness knows the world needs more people with ambition and drive.
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    (Original post by Howard)
    I've done tons of professional exams/interviews too. Chartered Builder, Chartered Surveyor. I'm working on my Chartered Arbitrator exams right now.....two more to do + a pupillage + a load of other BS and I'll make Chartered Arbitrator so I'll be chartered three times. Not bad for a thick ******* who left school at 16 if I do say so myself!

    I'm always fcukin around trying to get more letters after my name (in fact I'm a bit of a junkie in that regard)
    Howie - you are just too modest - I bet you were never a 'thick' 16 year old.
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    (Original post by Profesh)
    I'm going out on a limb in assuming that your first name is simply 'H'.
    It's "Bernard" actually.
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    (Original post by yawn)
    Howie - you are just too modest - I bet you were never a 'thick' 16 year old.
    I could send you a seedy reply but I'll stop myself.
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    (Original post by Howard)
    It's "Bernard" actually.
    So thats where Bernand Manning spends all his time these days
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    Howard! Seedy! never!
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    (Original post by brasil85)
    Working class are different to me. I don't know any working class but would like to meet some. From places up north

    Your comment frustrates me, it seems to me you have a terrible bias against people in the north. I think you will find that there are millions of working class people in the south east of england, believe it or not, you do not have to hike up north to find them all. There seems to be a myth among SOME south-easteners that Northeners are some different culture. I know many southeners who are evry open minded, educated people who have no misconceptions about northeners.
    There is only one way which this kind of bias is created, and this is when weak, less able people, allow the media to dictate how they view different people. :p:
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    If they can afford to go to public school by all means yes, if they can't TOUGH!

    You get what you pay for in this world. Its about time people realised that they can't have everything, everyone has their place. If they can change it through hard work and determination fine, but they shouldn't expect to society to give it to them on a plate.

    I didn't go to public school, I would have liked to but my parents couldn't afford it. I had to accept that.

    Not everyone can be equal it doesn't work, history has shown us this. A hierarchy is needed of some kind, we have to accept this. It can't be helped.
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    Yes I fully agree, if you can pay for the best, have it. In a recent debate these people (who went to state if that makes any difference) went on about whether people deserve to go to a private school-nobody deserves it, they can just flipping pay for it!!! They brought up all these arguements about people going to state come out the same without paying extra-well what's the problem then? You do our thing and we'll do ours-my parents wanted to pay for me to be in a certain environment so they did! It's their money-I didn't appreciate being personally insulted because I went there (along the lines of snob & arrogant etc) but you can still be like that no matter what school you go to. Anyway I was too young to make any decision-the same for all of us-our parents had to make the decision-so why do we have to live with the blame (bullied etc) for going to a private school > I don't like people like that.
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    (Original post by brasil85)
    Working class are different to me. I don't know any working class but would like to meet some. From places up north
    Hahahahahaha! is this guy for real? he sounds like he sees people from a working class background as animals in a zoo!
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    (Original post by Ariel4)
    Hahahahahaha! is this guy for real? he sounds like he sees people from a working class background as animals in a zoo!
    They're not quite that bad. I knew a working class person once; he had a council house and everything.
 
 
 
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