Straight A students in US of A? Watch

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Alcohol5%
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Students that are getting straight As in the UK are quite few, apart from when a level results come on, but then it is only 3 subjects.

However, in America they seem to be quite a common phenomena, with every other child being a straight A student, captain of the football/hockey team and a generally nice person.

Is this quite true, or just a sterotype or woteva?
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moon·struck
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(Original post by Alcohol5%)
Students that are getting straight As in the UK are quite few, apart from when a level results come on, but then it is only 3 subjects.

However, in America they seem to be quite a common phenomena, with every other child being a straight A student, captain of the football/hockey team and a generally nice person.

Is this quite true, or just a sterotype or woteva?
I wouldn't know quite where to start.
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Dreama
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Ok... back away from the TV...
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Bismarck
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(Original post by Alcohol5%)
Students that are getting straight As in the UK are quite few, apart from when a level results come on, but then it is only 3 subjects.

However, in America they seem to be quite a common phenomena, with every other child being a straight A student, captain of the football/hockey team and a generally nice person.

Is this quite true, or just a sterotype or woteva?
When people say "straight-A student", they don't really mean that literally. They just mean this students does well in school. Only about 1% of the people in high school average something close to an A. In university, the percentage is much higher though (maybe 5%).
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Bilal
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Not sure, but it's pretty rare for people to get AAA @ AH.
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ponjavic
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if anybody cares in Sweden it's 0.5% of all students getting grades.
For about 30 courses all graded
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Fluent in Lies
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I think too many people get 3 -4 A's in the UK
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BlackHawk
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The US school system is 10 times easier that the UK one. I went to both, big difference.
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Johnny 5
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(Original post by Fluent in Lies)
I think too many people get 3 -4 A's in the UK
.
Really, I'm not complaining.
Alcohol5%
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Probably is just on TV.
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ylime
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(Original post by Bismarck)
When people say "straight-A student", they don't really mean that literally. They just mean this students does well in school. Only about 1% of the people in high school average something close to an A. In university, the percentage is much higher though (maybe 5%).
What?! I've never seen or heard "straight-A student" to mean anything other than literally a "straight-A student," and certainly more than 1% of high school students do get "close to" A's. That said, even though yes, grade inflation is big here, nowhere near half of us get straight A's.

But really, you aren't going to hear about people who aren't successful.
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Bismarck
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(Original post by ylime)
What?! I've never seen or heard "straight-A student" to mean anything other than literally a "straight-A student," and certainly more than 1% of high school students do get "close to" A's. That said, even though yes, grade inflation is big here, nowhere near half of us get straight A's.

But really, you aren't going to hear about people who aren't successful.
Having an A-average entails much more than getting a few As; it requires almost all your grades to be As. Using a standard 4.0 system, where an A- is 3.7 and an A is 4.0, having straight As requires having an average of above 3.85. How many do you know that have that average?

Regardless, grade inflation is getting out of control here. In some of my college classes, as much as a third of the class get As. Where's the sense of achievement in that?
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Debussy
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i have a vaugely related question... when us students talk about AP classes, do they just mean a higher stream of students? like all the a grade students are together?
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IB The Great
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(Original post by BlackHawk)
The US school system is 10 times easier that the UK one. I went to both, big difference.
Be careful. The famous AP programme is as difficult as the A-levels. Moreoever, IB is certainly "beyond" all.

(Original post by Bismarck")
Having an A-average entails much more than getting a few As; it requires almost all your grades to be As. Using a standard 4.0 system, where an A- is 3.7 and an A is 4.0, having straight As requires having an average of above 3.85. How many do you know that have that average?
You forget that A+ = 4.3. Courses that are labelled Pre-IB/Pre-AP/Honours/Advanced/Intensified have a weight of +.5. Courses that are labelled IB/AP have a weight of +1.

A+ = 98-100 (therefore, not many people get this)
A = 94-97 (not easy either)
A- = 91-93 (not too easy, but not too difficult)

My WGPA (weighted GPA) is a bit above 4.0 because of the advanced courses that I have ever taken and the A+'s that I have ever gained.
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Bismarck
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(Original post by medic_bex)
i have a vaugely related question... when us students talk about AP classes, do they just mean a higher stream of students? like all the a grade students are together?
No, AP classes are generally optional for those students who feel they're not learning much from the regular classes. They are taught by university-certified teachers and usually require university-level work. Many schools don't have AP classes at all though, and very few have more than a handful. Out of all the public schools in New York City for example, there are only three high schools that have a good range of AP classes to choose from.

(Original post by IB The Great)
Be careful. The famous AP programme is as difficult as the A-levels. Moreoever, IB is certainly "beyond" all.

You forget that A+ = 4.3. Courses that are labelled Pre-IB/Pre-AP/Honours/Advanced/Intensified have a weight of +.5. Courses that are labelled IB/AP have a weight of +1.

A+ = 98-100 (therefore, not many people get this)
A = 94-97 (not easy either)
A- = 91-93 (not too easy, but not too difficult)

My WGPA (weighted GPA) is a bit above 4.0 because of the advanced courses that I have ever taken and the A+'s that I have ever gained.
Public schools in New York don't allow A+. The people I know who had an above 4.0 GPA went to private schools. Honors and AP courses didn't have an additional weight either. In fact, taking those classes in NY is a good way to lower your average.
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Flukey
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(Original post by Alcohol5%)
Students that are getting straight As in the UK are quite few, apart from when a level results come on, but then it is only 3 subjects.

However, in America they seem to be quite a common phenomena, with every other child being a straight A student, captain of the football/hockey team and a generally nice person.

Is this quite true, or just a sterotype or woteva?
Yeah thats sorta true, dont forget USA examinations are far easier then English Examinations.
moon·struck
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(Original post by medic_bex)
i have a vaugely related question... when us students talk about AP classes, do they just mean a higher stream of students? like all the a grade students are together?
AP is crap.

It's basically subjects already offered in high school taught at a university level, it's optional not actually challenging. And towards the end of the school year (now actually) students get to take AP Tests if they get certain scores they're awarded college credit.
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Toy Soldier
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(Original post by Bilal786)
Not sure, but it's pretty rare for people to get AAA @ AH.
5 A's at Higher is fairly common though, at least it was at my school. Somewhere between 5 and 10% of my year, I think. You don't need 3 A's at AH unless you want to go to Oxbridge, and even then for the best courses an ABB will usually do (if there are another 2 'A' subjects at Higher).
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riotgrrrl
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(Original post by Bismarck)

Public schools in New York don't allow A+. The people I know who had an above 4.0 GPA went to private schools. Honors and AP courses didn't have an additional weight either. In fact, taking those classes in NY is a good way to lower your average.
Thought I would just point out for people in england who could get mixed up in America public mis the eqivilent to state school in eng.
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IB The Great
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(Original post by flukey2005)
Yeah thats sorta true, dont forget USA examinations are far easier then English Examinations.
AP is equivalent to A-levels, just so you know.
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