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    (Original post by harr)
    I couldn't be bothered to read all of Dr Faustus as I found the language a bit offputting, for some reason to a much greater extent than when reading stuff by Shakespeare.
    I didn't find it any different to Shakespeare, except far more funny.
    (Original post by harr)
    When he had stretched himself on the sofa, he looked at the title-page of the book. It was Gautier's Emaux et Camees, Charpentier's Japanese-paper edition, with the Jacquemart etching. The binding was of citron-green leather, with a design of gilt trellis-work and dotted pomegranates. It had been given to him by Adrian Singleton. As he turned over the pages, his eye fell on the poem about the hand of Lacenaire, the cold yellow hand "du supplice encore mal lavee," with its downy red hairs and its "doigts de faune." He glanced at his own white taper fingers, shuddering slightly in spite of himself, and passed on, till he came to those lovely stanzas upon Venice
    Keep it up. Soon we won't have any need to go out and buy the book for ourselves :laugh: :p:
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    (Original post by Craghyrax)
    I didn't find it any different to Shakespeare, except far more funny.
    There's no particular reason why you should find it different. I think the only reason I didn't like the language as much was that I was half-heartedly reading it off a computer, instead of having the book in front of me or watching the play.
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    (Original post by harr)
    I couldn't be bothered to read all of Dr Faustus as I found the language a bit offputting, for some reason to a much greater extent than when reading stuff by Shakespeare. I should probably give it another go as I didn't really try last time. I agree that the rest of Dorian is faster paced, but you still get occasional passages such as:

    When he had stretched himself on the sofa, he looked at the title-page of the book. It was Gautier's Emaux et Camees, Charpentier's Japanese-paper edition, with the Jacquemart etching. The binding was of citron-green leather, with a design of gilt trellis-work and dotted pomegranates. It had been given to him by Adrian Singleton. As he turned over the pages, his eye fell on the poem about the hand of Lacenaire, the cold yellow hand "du supplice encore mal lavee," with its downy red hairs and its "doigts de faune." He glanced at his own white taper fingers, shuddering slightly in spite of himself, and passed on, till he came to those lovely stanzas upon Venice

    Some may like that sort of thing, but it's not really my style -- I just find it excessive. Re-reading LotR recently reminded me how much description can help novels, but I generally prefer them to get to the point.
    Exactly. And even LoTR was a bit excessive.
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    (Original post by Craghyrax)
    I didn't find it any different to Shakespeare, except far more funny.
    Funny?

    *adds to overly swollen reading list*
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    (Original post by ukebert)
    Funny?

    *adds to overly swollen reading list*
    Yes. Funny
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    Welcome to anything154 and Kirsty08, the newest members of the society
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    I've read two books in two days - and i've had no sleep :p:. The books would be books 2 and 3 of Star Wars: Legacy of the Force.

    Must-reads for any SW fan - but if you've not read the preceeding 100 books, then I suggest you start on those first :p:.
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    :eek:
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    I never really considered this as an active society. What do you folks do here?
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    (Original post by Kater Murr)
    I never really considered this as an active society. What do you folks do here?
    Spam. Occasionally talk about books we're reading.
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    Oh .
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    (Original post by Kater Murr)
    Oh .
    Excuse me?
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    (Original post by Craghyrax)
    Excuse me?
    I don't know . I thought I could just pop in here any time, and someone would be talking about books.
    Obviously not.
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    (Original post by Kater Murr)
    I don't know . I thought I could just pop in here any time, and someone would be talking about books.
    Obviously not.
    Did you have a look at any recent posts? The thing about talking about books is that somebody has to generate conversation :p: I'm sure if you talk about a book, others will talk back to you.
    I can't talk to you about books unless you're interested in Kant's Perpetual Peace, Collins Interaction and Ritual Chains, or Wilkinson's The Impact of Inequality :p:
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    (Original post by Craghyrax)
    Did you have a look at any recent posts? The thing about talking about books is that somebody has to generate conversation :p: I'm sure if you talk about a book, others will talk back to you.
    I can't talk to you about books unless you're interested in Kant's Perpetual Peace, Collins Interaction and Ritual Chains, or Wilkinson's The Impact of Inequality :p:
    ;console;

    It depresses me that I haven't read much recently The only times where I really read seem to be on holiday. It appears that gone are the days where I would go to bed at 10, start a book and finish it at about 2 every night :cry:
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    Kater Murr: This is exactly the kind of society that you can just pop into anytime and people will talk to you about stuff :p:.

    I know it's this kind of society because it's mine :evil: :vader:.

    Of course, the talking will depend on the online-status of every member, but the chances are that you'll get a response fairly quickly.
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    Has anyone read anything by Saul Bellow?
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    No . What genre?
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    Oh, just general fiction. Themes of isolation. That kind of thing.
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    Yay for new society!
    Unfortunately i've been on a reading hiatus this week. Currently on Midnight's Children, and Eye of the Cat in the subway(Midnight's children doesn't fit in my bag ).

    Eye of the Cat is my first fantasy novel, just started, and I am so confused>.<. I'm thinking fantasy is asking too much from my tired mind.
 
 
 
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