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    :dontknow: Those books sound far too close to being actually educational for my liking :p:.
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    (Original post by Abiraleft)
    Just finished 'Lord of the Flies' - hadn't read it before, and I think it's absolutely brilliant. Astonishingly perceptive about social psychology and power dynamics.

    Also read 'Raven's Gate' and 'Evil Star' by Anthony Horowitz a couple of days ago. They're kind of fantasy, but dark. Good for light reading.
    Good taste there. Ive been into all narcissistic pieces for a while now, so Fitzgerald and Waugh were down my line, and finally Im starting down Wilde for the first time. I also enjoy the classic british aristocracy for some bizarre reason and Wodehouse takes the cake. I'll marry any babe who shares my views on Wodehouse.:woo:
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    (Original post by Demon_AS)
    :dontknow: Those books sound far too close to being actually educational for my liking :p:.
    Don't tell me you're into Twilight? :confused: can't think of anything more intellectually demoralising!
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    (Original post by Life-in-technicolor)
    My favourite authors are Charlotte Bronte, Hemingway, a pile of Bulgarian writers, and to a certain extent, Pratchett and P. Coelho (don't kill me! and no, i'm not a model ). By the way, what do you think about Ayn Rand? I have been hearing people more and more often quote her work. Is she overrated or worth reading?
    I've heard of Charlotte Bronte, but haven't read anything by her. Hemingway is :coma:. I've never read anything by a Bulgarian writer, I think - any particular writers you'd recommend?

    Wrt Ayn Rand, I've only read 'The Fountainhead', and I hated the philosophy but liked the book. So yes, it's worth reading imo.

    (Original post by emerset)
    Good taste there. Ive been into all narcissistic pieces for a while now, so Fitzgerald and Waugh were down my line, and finally Im starting down Wilde for the first time. I also enjoy the classic british aristocracy for some bizarre reason and Wodehouse takes the cake. I'll marry any babe who shares my views on Wodehouse.
    Cheers. I don't think I've heard of any of the writers you've mentioned, except Wilde (who I haven't read, but have been meaning to). Classic British aristocracy? Do you mean bourgeoise writers, or actually people who inherit large sums of money? Or is it a genre of writing? :confused:

    I'm reading 'A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man' by James Joyce at the moment, and it's so, so good. :sogood:
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    (Original post by Abiraleft)
    I've heard of Charlotte Bronte, but haven't read anything by her. Hemingway is :coma:. I've never read anything by a Bulgarian writer, I think - any particular writers you'd recommend?

    Wrt Ayn Rand, I've only read 'The Fountainhead', and I hated the philosophy but liked the book. So yes, it's worth reading imo.
    Haha, Hemingway has too specific a style to appeal to everyone, but I like his cut-the-fat-leave-the-muscles approach to writing. And the messages he conveys, particularly in The Old Man and The Sea. This book helped me get through an extremely rough period in my life, so I have hardly any choice but to be thankful and respectful
    Well, depends on what you like reading. There is revolutionary poetry, prose mainly focused on social issues (probably won't be interesting as I presume you are not acquainted with Bulgarian history), symbolism, expressionism... Now I'd say Pencho Slaveykov, particularly his miniatures - he was the first truly intellectual and modern Bulgarian poet and on the verge of being nominated for a Nobel prize. If you give me some more information about your preferences, I might know what else to recommend .
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    (Original post by emerset)
    Don't tell me you're into Twilight? :confused: can't think of anything more intellectually demoralising!
    Hahahaha... no, I hate Twilight with a bitter passion.

    I'm a big fan of fantasy... but I prefer books that are good :p:.
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    (Original post by Abiraleft)
    Cheers. I don't think I've heard of any of the writers you've mentioned, except Wilde (who I haven't read, but have been meaning to). Classic British aristocracy? Do you mean bourgeoise writers, or actually people who inherit large sums of money? Or is it a genre of writing? :confused:

    I'm reading 'A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man' by James Joyce at the moment, and it's so, so good. :sogood:
    Wow A Portrait. That is a unique book for the enlightened. I remember clearly my reaction to that book more than any other. I said "It's as complex and intricate as fine wine. I'll need to try it again in a later date.
    If you've not heard of P. G. Wodehouse (many of my buddies also never have) that is the one author I strongly recommend for every reader which every last person loves. I'm not joking. gtg!
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    (Original post by Life-in-technicolor)
    Haha, Hemingway has too specific a style to appeal to everyone, but I like his cut-the-fat-leave-the-muscles approach to writing. And the messages he conveys, particularly in The Old Man and The Sea. This book helped me get through an extremely rough period in my life, so I have hardly any choice but to be thankful and respectful
    Well, depends on what you like reading. There is revolutionary poetry, prose mainly focused on social issues (probably won't be interesting as I presume you are not acquainted with Bulgarian history), symbolism, expressionism... Now I'd say Pencho Slaveykov, particularly his miniatures - he was the first truly intellectual and modern Bulgarian poet and on the verge of being nominated for a Nobel prize. If you give me some more information about your preferences, I might know what else to recommend .
    Yup, I really loved the style of writing in 'The Old Man and the Sea'. It was very crisp and refreshing.

    I'm not that aquainted with Bulgarian history, but I'd love something to do with social issues! Revolutionary stuff would also be great.

    As to my preferences, I suppose my favourite writer (though I maintain that I have none) is Gabriel Garcia Marquez, whose repertoire is magical realism. I once went through a period of reading mainly 19th century Russian literature, so I also like the works of Chekhov and Tolstoy. More recent writers I like include Ursula le Guin and Philip Pullman. Atm, I'm reading James Joyce, whose writing I am absolutely loving.

    Don't know if that helped, really. Thanks for taking the trouble, btw.

    (Original post by emerset)
    Wow A Portrait. That is a unique book for the enlightened. I remember clearly my reaction to that book more than any other. I said "It's as complex and intricate as fine wine. I'll need to try it again in a later date.
    If you've not heard of P. G. Wodehouse (many of my buddies also never have) that is the one author I strongly recommend for every reader which every last person loves. I'm not joking. gtg!
    It really is a great book. I find I can relate to so many aspects of the protagonist, whilst learning so much about both Irish culture and socio-political economy, and Joyce's own views on life. And the way it's written is also incredible - like thoughts about a situation rather than the traditional narration of events.

    Nope, I haven't. I'll look out for them, thanks.
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    Ursula Le Guin :coma:.

    I will get around to buying the Earthsea Quartet soon.
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    (Original post by Demon_AS)
    Ursula Le Guin :coma:.

    I will get around to buying the Earthsea Quartet soon.
    Arjun! :hugs:

    You haven't bought the Earthsea Quartet yet! :eek: I would have thought that you had because you're the big sci-fi and fantasy reader that I look up to on here. :o:

    Mind you, I really want to get/read one of Ursula Le Guin's newest books that I haven't stared pursuing yet. :ninja:
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    (Original post by Elements)
    Arjun! :hugs:

    You haven't bought the Earthsea Quartet yet! :eek: I would have thought that you had because you're the big sci-fi and fantasy reader that I look up to on here. :o:

    Mind you, I really want to get/read one of Ursula Le Guin's newest books that I haven't stared pursuing yet. :ninja:
    Hey there, Elements. Long time no see - how've you been?

    I just haven't managed to scrape together the funds. I love the quartet, but for £14 I just can't justify it. So, once they get a bit cheaper - or I fold and buy it second hand - I will .
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    (Original post by Demon_AS)
    Ursula Le Guin :coma:.

    I will get around to buying the Earthsea Quartet soon.
    It's now a quintet, I believe. And read 'The Dispossessed' as well, it is immense. :yep:
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    (Original post by Abiraleft)
    I'm not that aquainted with Bulgarian history, but I'd love something to do with social issues! Revolutionary stuff would also be great.
    Thanks for taking the trouble, btw.
    Np Well, in fact I've no idea whether the translations of the books are good enough to recommend, but I'd definitely say Hristo Botev - he's got amazing revolutionary poems, sort of like the Hungarian Sandor Petofi, if it sounds more familiar. Pencho Slaveykov is still on the list, together with Geo Milev (avantgarde, inspired by German expressionism) and Hristo Smirnenski (some left-wing ideas, he wrote just before the rise of communism, still almost ingenious for the standards of the age). You might also be interested in Nikola Vaptsarov and Yordan Yovkov (Vaptsarov has more working-class messages, whereas Yovkov is focused on mm universal messages about the beautiful things in life & stuff). Still don't know what's available in terms of translations, though :rolleyes:
    You might want to note that the modern currents entered our literature rather late, due to the five-century reign of the Ottoman Empire over our territory (till 1878, to be precise). Btw, if you do find something Bulgarian and need help with the interpretation (I mean putting it in a socio-historical context and so on) I'm always available for help "from the source" :p:
    And I forgot to mention that I'm also a huge Earthsea fan :yep:
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    I'm reading catcher in the rye, if I see the phrase "I really do" one more time I'm going to scream!!!!!
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    (Original post by Abiraleft)
    It's now a quintet, I believe. And read 'The Dispossessed' as well, it is immense. :yep:
    A quintet? Really? Nice.
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    (Original post by Demon_AS)
    A quintet? Really? Nice.
    I checked, and it's actually six books, but one is short stories. I've only read the Quartet as well, though. And it's awesome. :woo:
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    So I got around to reading A Song of Ice and Fire, and it's easily the best fantasy I've read in a loooong time. How I let this slip under my radar I'll never know. I've ordered them all.

    Thanks for the recommendation, Demon
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    (Original post by Susant)
    So I got around to reading A Song of Ice and Fire, and it's easily the best fantasy I've read in a loooong time. How I let this slip under my radar I'll never know. I've ordered them all.

    Thanks for the recommendation, Demon
    :hubba: Anytime! I'm glad you're enjoying them so.

    Now buy Robert Jordan's Wheel of Time and Jim Butcher's Alera Codex and Robin Hobb's Farseer trilogy and Patrick Rothfuss' Name of the Wind and Peter Brett's The Painted Man...

    Then you'll know what REALLY good fantasy is. :teeth:
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    (Original post by Demon_AS)
    Now buy Robert Jordan's Wheel of Time...
    Wooww, Wheel of Time was too long even for the writer to finish in person! :rolleyes: But I suppose it's worth it, friends who have read it have continuously been trying to persuade me into doing it, but taking into account my almost chronic lack of time, I guess The Wheel is not the best investment.
    What about Pratchett, btw? Impressions? Favourite books? Sorry if discussed before
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    (Original post by Life-in-technicolor)
    Wooww, Wheel of Time was too long even for the writer to finish in person! :rolleyes: But I suppose it's worth it, friends who have read it have continuously been trying to persuade me into doing it, but taking into account my almost chronic lack of time, I guess The Wheel is not the best investment.
    What about Pratchett, btw? Impressions? Favourite books? Sorry if discussed before
    Ha, no need to apologise - all discussions new or old are welcome here lol.

    As for Pratchett, I tried his books, I really did. About five or six of them. They were ok, but nothing special in my opinion. Too little in the way of actual human interaction and character building (although I have been told that this is an odd criticism of his works - but that's just based on what I've read!).

    The Wheel of Time, on the other hand, has absolutely everything a good fantasy story needs. You have clearly defined heroes and villains, but the two carefully begin to blur the line between good and evil. You have the prophecies. You have the fantastic world built on a scope not seen since Tolkien. And then you have the sheer brilliance of a wonderful story, set achingly over (currently) 12 books.

    The Wheel of Time needs no recommendation to anybody lol, it recommends itself once you read one. And you shouldn't be put off by the fact that the series is so long - instead, you should glory in the fact that your joy over something so beautiful can stretch over that many hours!

    I could go on, but I think that's enough of a glowing report lol.
 
 
 
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