Architect Watch

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summer_glaz
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#1
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What do architect do?
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soulsussed
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#2
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design buildings
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summer_glaz
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what kinda of quality should an architect has?
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soulsussed
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Maths is good but people become archtects being not so good at maths. Just good at designing I guess and able to apply your designs to materials and think round problems. They'll be some good websites on architecture I'm sure, I'll get back to you, Imight find one.
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jrhartley
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Blend of skills I think - you need to be able to visualise how space could be used, you need to be able to communicate those ideas to your clients and colleagues (so art for drawings is useful and also good language skills - i.e. good command of English to make clear and succinct explanations). You need to be able to listen to your clients and understand what they want, and explain to them why that might or might not work, plus deal with planning authorities - so diplomacy skills. plus computing / an understanding of physics and maths is also useful - more and more drawing boards are being replaced by CAD in large practices. to get into uni though the main thing you need to demonstrate is some artistic skill, a bit of 'attitude' as to what you're going to do for the built environment. it is becoming increasingly common that you will be expected to submit a portfolio of art after your UCAS application as pressure on university places grows and they don't have time to interview the growing number of applicants.

hope that's of help.
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jrhartley
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(Original post by summer_glaz)
what kinda of quality should an architect has?
A good book which is worth reading if you are interested in becoming an architect is "The Fountainhead" - its a work by Ayn Rand. It's kinda overlaid with her philosophical views, but it a good novel nonetheless, and it demonstrates the determination and head-strong-ness (new word?!) that you need to sometimes display - ultimately a lot of it is applicable to any profession, but Howard Roark, the main protagonist, is an architect.

http://www.careersinarchitecture.net/

is the RIBA architecture site for those thinking of becoming an architect - you can find out what's involved, which universities offer RIBA certified courses, etc.
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The Merovingian
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Well, maths and graphics are essential and paitience is another one because it takes 7 years to become a fully qualified architect!!
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soulsussed
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(Original post by The Merovingian)
Well, maths and graphics are essential and paitience is another one because it takes 7 years to become a fully qualified architect!!
Hopefully they'll change these really long degrees, like for doctors as wel to 3 years like everything else.
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jrhartley
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(Original post by soulsussed)
Hopefully they'll change these really long degrees, like for doctors as wel to 3 years like everything else.
I don't think its very likely - they need to be long so you can actually get the experience you need. Clearly being a doctor or an architect has wider implications if you get things wrong than being, say, an economist. I have heard that there are some places now offering 5 year architecture courses, whereby you don't get any vacations, you work non-stop for 5 years. But I can't see them becoming only 3 years.
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pink_lucie
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my dad's one and he has his own business :cool: he trained for 7 yrs! :eek:
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summer_glaz
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#11
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#11
if i wanna be an architect
should i take architecture or architecture engineering?
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jrhartley
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Architecture K100 will give you the RIBA part 1, folled by the MArch (RIBA part 2) and you then do RIBA part 3 as a part-time / distance course. After around 8 years if you pass your exams, you can call yourself an architect. Architectural engineers are different. Check the RIBA link I gave for information.
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Praddles
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(Original post by jrhartley)
Architecture K100 will give you the RIBA part 1, folled by the MArch (RIBA part 2) and you then do RIBA part 3 as a part-time / distance course. After around 8 years if you pass your exams, you can call yourself an architect. Architectural engineers are different. Check the RIBA link I gave for information.
Not totally accurate - You study either a BA or BSc Architecture for your RIBA Part 1, followed by a BArch for your RIBA Part 2, and finally get your MArch when you finish the course (RIBA Part 3).
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soulsussed
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(Original post by jrhartley)
I don't think its very likely - they need to be long so you can actually get the experience you need. Clearly being a doctor or an architect has wider implications if you get things wrong than being, say, an economist. I have heard that there are some places now offering 5 year architecture courses, whereby you don't get any vacations, you work non-stop for 5 years. But I can't see them becoming only 3 years.
But the whole time isn't in uni, I know for a doctor your just working up ladder where you move up and then you choose where you wanna specialise. Damn, I'll just look it up!!!
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soulsussed
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A five-year degree programme, on a course that is recognised by the Royal Institute of British Architects (RIBA) and the Architects Registration Board (ARB). This is usually divided into two parts: A three year degree, known as RIBA Part 1 followed by a further two years of advanced undergraduate study, known as RIBA Part 2.

A minimum of two years Professional Experience in an architects' office or equivalent. One year is usually taken after Part 1 (Stage 1 Professional Experience), and the other year after Part 2 (Stage 2 Professional Experience).

This is followed by the RIBA Part 3 Examination in Professional Practice and Management. From the start of your studies you are eligible to become a Student Member of the RIBA. Upon successful completion of Part 2 you can become a Graduate Member with additional benefits
Having gained these qualifications you can register as an architect with the ARB and can apply to become a Chartered Member of the RIBA. Only when you have completed these stages can you actually call yourself an architect. The title is protected by law so that the public can always be sure that you are properly qualified.


There!! This is off that very useful website given further back in the thread. So its not like your not going to be in work until 26 or anything, you've just got to work up a ladder. It's very similar to qualifying as a doctor.
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jrhartley
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(Original post by soulsussed)
There!! This is off that very useful website given further back in the thread. So its not like your not going to be in work until 26 or anything, you've just got to work up a ladder. It's very similar to qualifying as a doctor.
I'm not really sure what your point is here / what we are debating - that's no different from what I was saying before as far as I can tell - at least its no different from what I was thinking - maybe I didn't explain myself well.

My point was that like with medecine, there's no way that you can compress the course and the experience into 3 years. I stand by that comment. I never disputed the format of the degree - in fact I think I was the one who posted the link to the RIBA website in the first place.
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summer_glaz
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#17
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thanks!!
ah.. that's a long way... I seriously have to think carefuly before i choose..
so frustrated ><
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sneezyme
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#18
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my dad's an architect
(sorry for the randomness)
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Howard
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#19
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(Original post by jrhartley)
Architecture K100 will give you the RIBA part 1, folled by the MArch (RIBA part 2) and you then do RIBA part 3 as a part-time / distance course. After around 8 years if you pass your exams, you can call yourself an architect. Architectural engineers are different. Check the RIBA link I gave for information.
Actually, a minor point but anyone can call themselves an Architect and practice as one; just so long as you don't call yourself a "Chartered Architect"
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jrhartley
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(Original post by Howard)
Actually, a minor point but anyone can call themselves an Architect and practice as one; just so long as you don't call yourself a "Chartered Architect"
Now, I think this might be a difference between the US and the UK. In the UK as far as I know you can call yourself anything but "Architect" - you can call yourself an "architectural designer", whatever, but if you put your name up followed by plain", Architect" the ARB / RIBA are entitled to come after. At least that's what I've been informed by schools, practising architects, etc. in the UK.

That's not to say if you're not an architect you can't design private buildings - hell - I'm doing one right now! God help the destined inhabitants!
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