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Least Amount of Qualifications to go Uni watch

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    What are the least amount of qualifications you need to go to uni for what ever course, just a thought i was thinking and any course. Like can you get only gcses or just an avce or even less possibly, anyone got any ideas and does it matter what age you have to be for example?
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    I think it's an E at A level.
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    You need to achieve an A-level or some other level 3 qualification. You can't go into uni with only GCSEs. As the person said above, you need at least 1 A-level at grade E or above to do a university course. With one A-level, you would be stuck with a HNC/HND course and maybe a foundation degree course. If you take 2-3 A-levels, you would be doing a degree course.
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    Yep as Trev says. Also you can go to university with an AVCE its worth the same as A levels after all.

    I've seen some degrees asking for 120 entry points. With one A level even many universities may turn you down for an HND depending on the circumstances.
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    (Original post by AT82)
    Yep as Trev says. Also you can go to university with an AVCE its worth the same as A levels after all.

    I've seen some degrees asking for 120 entry points. With one A level even many universities may turn you down for an HND depending on the circumstances.
    What is the point of an entrance requirements that is asking for 120 points for a degree course and turn you down for HND? Shouldn't that entrance requirement be for an HND instead of a degree?
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    (Original post by trev)
    What is the point of an entrance requirements that is asking for 120 points for a degree course and turn you down for HND? Shouldn't that entrance requirement be for an HND instead of a degree?
    Because it depends largely on the subject and demand, also quite often if a degree is asking for 120 points there is no HND version. Some degrees are either so easy or have so little demand that they have to take EEU students just to fill places.

    For example an HND in Electrical Engineering will probably be much harder than a degree in Party and Alchohol Studies. I have even seen a degree called Office Skills. :mad:
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    (Original post by AT82)
    Because it depends largely on the subject and demand, also quite often if a degree is asking for 120 points there is no HND version. Some degrees are either so easy or have so little demand that they have to take EEU students just to fill places.

    For example an HND in Electrical Engineering will probably be much harder than a degree in Party and Alchohol Studies. I have even seen a degree called Office Skills. :mad:
    Where did you see a degree in Office Skills?

    I don't think they should set the offers that low if there are not much demand for the course.
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    (Original post by trev)
    Where did you see a degree in Office Skills?

    I don't think they should set the offers that low if there are not much demand for the course.
    I agree, there is no standards at all, for this particular course the dissertation is 5000 words (which is nothing) and then there is just a few little assignments. I am not sure what the course is called I think it may have been scrapped but it was somthing like Leisure and Tourism, I know of a couple of students who did it, they just had a party for three years and are now working in a supermarket full time. What a waste.

    I think it may have been scrapped though.

    The office skills degree was a foundation degree at Northampton University Colllege.
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    If you are classed as a mature student then you don't need any qualifications. You can just apply via UCAS and you will most likely be invited to an interview where they will weight up your various merits.

    To be classed as a mature student, I think, you have to have been out of full-time education for 3 years and be over 21.

    When I applied to university, I was classed as a mature student. Although I did have A-levels, I tried applying to some universities that had much higher requirements than the A-level results I had and to my suprise they all accepted me without interview. I think they realise that mature students are actually more mature and more likely to do well. In my case, I went to Plymouth anyway because it is closest to home and that is important to me.

    Anyway, hope that helps
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    Why do mature students not need the same qualifications as under 21 year olds? It seems a bit unfair that they're not tested in the same way academically as the others.
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    (Original post by pikaboo)
    Why do mature students not need the same qualifications as under 21 year olds? It seems a bit unfair that they're not tested in the same way academically as the others.
    Well there are a few reasons I guess. First and foremost, if you have been out of education for 3 years you are likely to have forgotten everything you were taught at a-level anyway so the grades you got in it arn't really that relevant.

    Also, mature students are likely to be more committed to the course and hence work harder and do well. This is because for a mature student to go to university, they would have given up paid employment to go back into education which is quite a big step. In my case, I gave up a very well paid job, a home, and the best friends you could ever wish for. If you are giving up all this to become a student and get in debt, you are much likely to ensure you get the best out of university rather than drinking the 3 years away. I am in halls for mature students and the amount of work we put in is quite significant compared to the average college leaver that seems to spend every waking hour at the pub.

    Also, many mature students are actually 30+ and so when they were younger, A-levels and suchlike didn't exist.

    Just because you are a mature student, it doesn't mean they will let anyone in. You are still accessed; just not solely on your academic record.
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    I am currently doing an Access course and it's piss easy...I've compared the work I'm doing with that a few friends did in the same subjects at AS level and it only just compares...it's nowhere near A level standard. Anyway, for a lot of Unis you only need 16 credits to get in, 12 at level 3 (barely AS level standard) and 4 at level 2 (GCSE standard).

    How people with this few qualifications cope with degree level study I have no idea, but I would imagine it would be pretty damn hard!
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    (Original post by *starbuck*)
    How people with this few qualifications cope with degree level study I have no idea, but I would imagine it would be pretty damn hard!
    Yeah there are a few people on my course that don't actually have an A-level in Biology (although they have other A-levels) and they are really struggling because that level of knowledge is assumed.
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    I am on an access course studying science and have to agree it is really easy, very time consuming as over a year but no where near as had as a levels. I have just been offered a place at UCL studying biomedical science! BTW im 23!
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    (Original post by AT82)
    I agree, there is no standards at all, for this particular course the dissertation is 5000 words (which is nothing) and then there is just a few little assignments. I am not sure what the course is called I think it may have been scrapped but it was somthing like Leisure and Tourism, I know of a couple of students who did it, they just had a party for three years and are now working in a supermarket full time. What a waste.

    I think it may have been scrapped though.

    The office skills degree was a foundation degree at Northampton University Colllege.
    I think the uni don't think that the people would achieve more than 160, that's why they lowered it to 120. I saw a course in Salford that is low as 160, I think it was Travel and Tourism or something like that. Do you know anybody doing that course?

    Ok then, I thought to office skills degree was a proper one instead of a foundation degree. A foundation degree for those kinds of courses are reasonable I guess.
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    (Original post by NikNak)
    You are still accessed;
    :eek: sounds painful.
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    (Original post by timeofyourlife)
    :eek: sounds painful.
    hahahaha!! *falls off chair* oops that was an unfortunate mistake!!
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    All the best students on my course are the mature students, by that I mean those in their late 20's to early 40's. They are really hard working and understand the value of education, where as many of the 18 year olds don't quite realise how valuable their education is.

    PS Trev this is Travel and Tourism I am talking about, just got the title wrong, at least they seem to have upted the points. Even now its still regarded as a bit of a joke. Still the job scores in the league table for that course don't look too bad despite the people I know have ot done well.

    I got 270 UCAS points, my course needed 220, I think 220 is about right but anything less than this unless people work harder for their circumstances are different I can't see how people expect to pass it.
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    (Original post by Natmarjus)
    I am on an access course studying science and have to agree it is really easy, very time consuming as over a year but no where near as had as a levels. I have just been offered a place at UCL studying biomedical science! BTW im 23!
    Congrats!

    I'm doing it over a year too but I haven't found it time consuming at all - I'm only in college 12 hours a week and rarely have homework to do. How many credits are you doing?
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    (Original post by AT82)
    All the best students on my course are the mature students, by that I mean those in their late 20's to early 40's. They are really hard working and understand the value of education, where as many of the 18 year olds don't quite realise how valuable their education is.

    PS Trev this is Travel and Tourism I am talking about, just got the title wrong, at least they seem to have upted the points. Even now its still regarded as a bit of a joke. Still the job scores in the league table for that course don't look too bad despite the people I know have ot done well.

    I got 270 UCAS points, my course needed 220, I think 220 is about right but anything less than this unless people work harder for their circumstances are different I can't see how people expect to pass it.
    How come the best students tend to be mature students? Some 18 year olds work hard and understand the value of education too. It just depends what type of 18 year olds you have on the course.
 
 
 
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